@C - CORN - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Mar '18 347'6 346'4 347'4 0'0
May '18 356'0 355'2 356'0 0'2
Jul '18 364'4 363'4 364'2 0'0
Sep '18 371'4 370'4 371'4 0'2
Dec '18 380'2 379'2 380'2 0'2
Mar '19 390'0 389'2 389'4 -0'2
@S - SOYBEANS - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Jan '18 970'4 963'4 966'6 -0'4
Mar '18 981'0 974'0 977'4 -0'4
May '18 991'6 985'0 988'4 -0'4
Jul '18 1001'4 995'0 998'4 -0'4
Aug '18 1002'4 998'0 999'6 -1'2
Sep '18 995'4 990'6 990'6 -3'0
Nov '18 991'0 984'0 986'4 -1'2
@K - HARD RED WINTER WHEAT - KCBT
Month High Low Last Chg
Mar '18 421'6 419'4 420'4 3'0
May '18 434'0 432'4 433'2 3'0
Jul '18 450'2 447'2 449'0 2'6
Sep '18 464'6 463'6 463'6 2'6
@L - LIVE CATTLE - CME
Month High Low Last Chg
Dec '17 119.250 116.500 118.900 2.625
Feb '18 121.575 118.800 121.025 1.875
@C - COTTON #2 - ICEFU
Month High Low Last Chg
Mar '18 76.45 75.56 75.96 0.04
May '18 76.79 75.90 76.26 -0.06
Jul '18 77.20 76.41 76.62 -0.12
DTN Click here for info on Exchange delays.
Local
3 Steps to Preserve Insect Protection Technologies
The corn industry is announcing the expansion of the Take Action program to help farmers fight insect resistance and preserve the long-term effectiveness of Bt technology. “If we lose the tools we have, there’s a financial risk of facing insects we can no longer control,” says Don Duvall, farmer from Carmi, Illinois, and chairman of the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) Freedom to Operate action team. “Now is the time to take action before insects become resistant to Bt technology like weeds have become resistant to herbicides.” Through the Take Action program, farmers will have access to the latest tools and information to manage insects and prevent resistance development. Take Action is an industry-wide partnership founded by the soy checkoff that advocates a diverse approach to weed, disease and now insect management to avoid resistance. NCGA and the Agricultural Biotechnology Stewardship Technical Committee (ABSTC), a consortium of Bt corn registrants, are part of the Take Action program that helps farmers develop insect resistance management plans and refuge strategies for their farms. “If we are going to stay ahead of insect resistance, we can’t cut corners,” says Duvall. “Take Action provides information to help farmers meet refuge requirements and preserve this technology for the future.” Take Action advocates three steps farmers can use today to help preserve current insect protection technologies and avoid resistance: Plant the required refuge based on geography and corn product. For corn-growing areas, refuge requirements are 5% or 20%. For cotton-growing areas, refuge requirements are 20% or 50%. Farmers should refer to their corn product’s Insect Resistance Management (IRM) guide for specific refuge details. Use multiple IRM strategies such as crop rotation, using pyramided traits, rotating Bt traits, and rotating and using multiple modes of action for insecticide seed treatments, soil-applied insecticides and foliar-applied insecticides. Scout fields in-season to determine the efficacy of control measures in place and to identify whether further action is necessary for effective control. Farmers interested in learning more about Take Action and insect resistance management can visit http://www.iwilltakeaction.com/. Source: Southeast Farm Press
National
Iowa couple sticks with cover crops
An Iowa farm couple isn?t giving up on cover crops.? Bret and Karen Seipold say their first try at cover crops didn?t go as planned, but they were determined to stay with them to improve soil quality and reduce erosion.? The persist with cover crops and other conservation practices on their Southwest Iowa farm.? Bret Seipold says in this feature first aired on Brownfield Ag News in August, he wants to farm with less negative impact on soil. Continue reading Iowa couple sticks with cover crops at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Don't Prepay 2018 State Income Taxes (And Paul Makes a Mistake)
Some commentators suggested prepaying 2018 state income tax in 2017 to get an extra deduction. The new Tax Bill indicates you can't do that. I also fess up to a mistake in one of my examples from yesterday's post and explain how much interest a farmer can deduct.
Facebook
If you haven't already, be sure to get signed up for our Winter ...
If you haven't already, be sure to get signed up for our Winter Planter Clinic which will be on Wednesday with registration beginning at 8 a.m. at the Bosselman Conference Center at Fonner Park in Grand Island! RSVP here: aceplanter.eventbrite.com>
Be sure to come see us at our booth today or tomorrow at the Nebraska ...
Be sure to come see us at our booth today or tomorrow at the Nebraska Power Farming Show at booth #1011!! Make sure to get signed up for our 3-in-1 giveaway!>
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By this time yesterday morning, nearby January soybean futures traded ...
By this time yesterday morning, nearby January soybean futures traded over 40,000 contracts. This morning, just over 16,000 have traded. The rainfall chances in Argentina and Southern Brazil has been reduced. Trade will be watching weather in South America very closely in the coming weeks as pollination for some corn production, mostly in Brazil will start towards the end of December. US traders are looking forward to the balance of the week wondering if we?ll see any new export demand. On the open at 8:30 a.m., corn a penny higher, soybeans up 6, KC wheat down 1 ?.>
Come visit us at the Nebraska Power Farming Show at Lancaster Event ...
Come visit us at the Nebraska Power Farming Show at Lancaster Event Center in Lincoln at booth #1011!>
CBOT markets are slightly higher as we start the first trading day of ...
CBOT markets are slightly higher as we start the first trading day of December. If corn futures close higher today, it would be the 3rd consecutive day of gains, which sadly would be the longest run of higher days since late September. Traders continue to watch South American weather with some heavy rains across Brazil, but Southern areas are not projected to see much, so dryness concerns continue. The USDA reported this morning that 130,000 tons of old crop corn was sold to ?Unknown? this morning. On the open at 8:30 a.m., corn +1/2, soybeans +3, KC wheat +1/2, and crude +90 cents at $58.29/barrel.>
Our York location held an awesome customer appreciation event last ...
Our York location held an awesome customer appreciation event last night! Special thank you to all the farmer-owners who attended...we wouldn't be here without you. #yourfarm #yourcooperative #yourfuture>
Join us for this special clinic to learn more on corn stand ...
Join us for this special clinic to learn more on corn stand establishment and ear count, planter set-up from hitch pin to closing wheels, and planter technology. The clinic will feature Missy and Bill Bauer along with Randy Dowdy. We look forward to seeing you there!>
Chicago markets are slightly weaker again this morning. Weekly export ...
Chicago markets are slightly weaker again this morning. Weekly export sales were disappointing and not helping the bullish trader?s position. Argentina weather looks to be somewhat wetter through the weekend, but next week looks drier. It?s the end of the month today and we could potentially see some wild markets today as traders either bank profits or trim losses ahead of next month. On the open at 8:30 a.m., corn down a penny, soybeans off a nickel, and KC wheat down 2.>
During this time of Thanksgiving, we give thanks for you ? our ...
During this time of Thanksgiving, we give thanks for you ? our farmer-owners. We value your patronage and appreciate your confidence in us. On behalf of everyone at Aurora Cooperative, we wish you a very Happy Thanksgiving.>
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Our Bertrand location did it's annual hats and gloves drive for all ...
Our Bertrand location did it's annual hats and gloves drive for all kindergarten students in the local schools! The Bertrand and Loomis students were excited to get new hats and gloves to keep them warm on the playground! #yourfuture>
Corn, soybeans, and wheat are all a little firmer to end the week. ...
Corn, soybeans, and wheat are all a little firmer to end the week. The market is anticipating that this afternoon's Commitment of Traders report will show near record short positions in the corn market. Market participants are starting to thin as traders trim positions ahead of next week?s holiday shortened week. With limited fresh news, CBOT traders are looking for a quick short covering day to offer support as we close out the week. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn +2, Soybeans +4, KC Wheat +4.>
Today, the Crop Science division of Bayer released results from an ...
Today, the Crop Science division of Bayer released results from an independent market research survey, revealing that the LibertyLink? system was the highest rated trait platform of the year.>
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for two full-time with ...
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for two full-time with benefits Propane/Fuel Delivery drivers. One position in the St. Paul area and one in the Gibbon area. CDL required and have to be able to obtain hazmat endorsement. Click here to apply: http://auroracoop.com/ContactUs>
Local
3 Steps to Preserve Insect Protection Technologies
The corn industry is announcing the expansion of the Take Action program to help farmers fight insect resistance and preserve the long-term effectiveness of Bt technology. “If we lose the tools we have, there’s a financial risk of facing insects we can no longer control,” says Don Duvall, farmer from Carmi, Illinois, and chairman of the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) Freedom to Operate action team. “Now is the time to take action before insects become resistant to Bt technology like weeds have become resistant to herbicides.” Through the Take Action program, farmers will have access to the latest tools and information to manage insects and prevent resistance development. Take Action is an industry-wide partnership founded by the soy checkoff that advocates a diverse approach to weed, disease and now insect management to avoid resistance. NCGA and the Agricultural Biotechnology Stewardship Technical Committee (ABSTC), a consortium of Bt corn registrants, are part of the Take Action program that helps farmers develop insect resistance management plans and refuge strategies for their farms. “If we are going to stay ahead of insect resistance, we can’t cut corners,” says Duvall. “Take Action provides information to help farmers meet refuge requirements and preserve this technology for the future.” Take Action advocates three steps farmers can use today to help preserve current insect protection technologies and avoid resistance: Plant the required refuge based on geography and corn product. For corn-growing areas, refuge requirements are 5% or 20%. For cotton-growing areas, refuge requirements are 20% or 50%. Farmers should refer to their corn product’s Insect Resistance Management (IRM) guide for specific refuge details. Use multiple IRM strategies such as crop rotation, using pyramided traits, rotating Bt traits, and rotating and using multiple modes of action for insecticide seed treatments, soil-applied insecticides and foliar-applied insecticides. Scout fields in-season to determine the efficacy of control measures in place and to identify whether further action is necessary for effective control. Farmers interested in learning more about Take Action and insect resistance management can visit http://www.iwilltakeaction.com/. Source: Southeast Farm Press
Nebraska Ag Update - December 15, 2017
Nebraska Ag Updates
Drought Monitor-Fires Ravage California, Snows Blanket South, Southeast
Conditions were dry and windy across much of the western United States over this past drought week, December 5-12. Wildfires, fueled by strong Santa Ana winds, destroyed hundreds of structures and burned well over 100,000 acres, enhancing the state’s deadliest and costliest wildfire year on record. An unprecedented purple flag (wind) warning was posted on the 8th. Red flag warnings were posted from Colorado to Illinois on the 11th. Daily temperatures were above average across the western two-thirds of the U.S., particularly notable across the Southwest stretching into the High Plains. Snow fell across the South and Southeast, a rarity in many places, including southern Texas eastward into Georgia. The storm unexpectedly dumped more than a foot of snow in parts of northern Georgia and North Carolina, with at least several inches widely reported. The storm continued to track across the mid-Atlantic and Northeast, leaving several inches on the ground there as well. Temperatures were as much as 15-25°F below average from parts of the Southern Plains to the Gulf Coast. Overall, with respect to drought, continued lack of moisture led to more degradation across parts of the West, High Plains, Midwest, and the South. A few areas improved, mainly in some of the far southern areas, where plentiful precipitation fell this past week. View current drought monitor here. West In New Mexico, the lack of precipitation over the past two months has taken a toll on soil moisture at 2-8 inch depths at most monitoring sites. Abnormally dry conditions spread across most of the eastern part of the state, save a small area in the southeastern corner. Southeast Most of the swath of abnormally dry and moderate drought conditions stretching from Virginia southward to the Florida panhandle, Alabama, and southern Mississippi received adequate rainfall this week. Several areas from Georgia to Virginia received 2-3 inches of precipitation. Despite the short-term benefits, longer-term dry conditions remain. For example, large areas in Virginia have still received just 25% or less of average rainfall over the past 1-3 months. Consistent precipitation or another large event is needed to improve conditions. Thus, no changes were made across North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia. Conditions improved across parts of northern Florida and southern Georgia, while northern Georgia saw no change. South While it was dry across much of the South, some southern regions saw welcome precipitation around the 7th to the 8th. Snow fell across south Texas. Corpus Christi recorded snow for just its ninth day on record, with 1-3 inches falling around the area. Drought conditions improved from southern Texas to southern Mississippi. However, it remained dry around the rest of the South, leading to the expansion of abnormally dry (D0) conditions across the Texas Panhandle. Moderate drought also spread westward across the Oklahoma Panhandle. Since October 6, Boise City has received a total of only 0.02 inch of precipitation. Normal for this period is about 2 inches. Numerous stations in the Panhandle reported no precipitation in the past two months. The lack of precipitation led to degraded conditions across other parts of central and northern Texas, parts of Oklahoma, northern Louisiana, and eastern and southern Arkansas. The area of extreme drought (D3) that was mainly centered in Arkansas last week creeped west into southeast Oklahoma, eastern Texas, northwest Louisiana, and farther east in Arkansas. Shreveport, Louisiana, in Caddo Parish, observed its fourth driest fall on record, with only 19% of normal rainfall recorded in the last three and a half months. Additionally, extreme drought (D3) was introduced to several counties in north central Arkansas and south central Missouri. Severe (D2) and extreme drought now encompass the vast majority of Arkansas. Jonesboro (Craighead County), in northeastern Arkansas, reported 2.66 inches of precipitation in the past 90 days, just 20% of normal and its driest such period on record. To the east, abnormally dry conditions were introduced in western and northern Tennessee. Midwest Dry conditions remained in Missouri, leading to an expansion of abnormally dry (D0) conditions in the west central portion of the state. In the south central region, a small area around Howell County deteriorated from severe (D2) to extreme (D3) drought. Several impacts were reported across the severe drought regions in Missouri. For example, producers are feeding hay due to minimal fall grass growth and little to no hay cuttings; some producers are moving cattle or hauling water because of low or empty ponds, or little to no flow in creeks and springs (many are saying it’s worse than 2012); there have been failures of fall sown crops germinating, and annuals such as oats and turnips have not produced well; wheat is not germinating properly. Dry conditions over the past couple of months led to the introduction of abnormally dry conditions across all of southern Kentucky and part of southern Illinois. The abnormally dry conditions in Iowa crept northeastward into the northwest corner of Illinois and into north central Iowa. It has been very dry since early to mid-October, resulting in dry surface conditions. High Plains Most of the region had above-average temperatures and little to no rainfall. The lack of precipitation continues a pattern of dryness in the region over at least the past couple of months. Lincoln, Nebraska, has received only 0.08 inch of precipitation since October 15, its driest such period on record. Abnormally dry conditions (D0) expanded greatly over Colorado into western Kansas, and northeastward into Nebraska. Moderate drought (D1) deteriorated to extreme drought (D2) in south central Kansas, adjoining the already extreme drought condition in north central Oklahoma. Abnormally dry conditions were expanded across the remainder of southeastern Kansas. Moisture there is less than half of average. Soil moisture levels are down and surface water supplies (stock ponds) are shrinking. Looking Ahead The precipitation pattern across the contiguous United States over the next week appears to be somewhat similar to the pattern seen over this past week: dryness from California stretching over to eastern Texas and Kansas. The far Pacific Northwest is poised to see heavy precipitation and some precipitation is expected over other parts of the Northwest and the High Plains. Most of the East Coast should also see some precipitation, with the heaviest amounts likely in New England. Looking further ahead, the Climate Prediction Center’s (CPC) 6-10-day forecast (December 19-23) indicates probable dryness across the western U.S., and parts of the Midwest, Mid-Atlantic, and Florida. Temperatures are expected to be above normal during this time across most of the contiguous U.S.; however, New England may be colder than average. Wet conditions are expected across the northern tier of the U.S. and in the Southeast, from Mississippi to Georgia. Looking even further out, CPC’s 8-14 day forecast (December 21-27) suggests dryness will prevail across the western U.S. and southern Florida. Wetness is projected across much of the northern U.S. most of the High Plains, and much of the South and Southeast. Warmer-than-average temperatures are expected across most of the Southwest and the Southeast, while cooler-than-average conditions may occur across most of the rest of the contiguous U.S. Source: U.S. Drought Monitor
Interest Rate Hike a Double-edged Sword for Ag
It was no surprise earlier this week when the Federal Reserve upped its federal funds rate target range by 0.25%. With their positive outlook for the U.S. economy, the Feds plan on continuing to raise interest rates well into 2018. This most recent hike was one of the bright spots for farm commodities this week, according to Mike Zuzolo from Global Commodity Analytics. “The Feds raised rates, as promised, because they see their inflation and employment mandates being met,” Zuzolo said. “We have already seen the gold market react, the crude oil market remains at its elevated levels of two-year highs and the dollar fell pretty precipitously. I would expect a similar reaction in the commodity markets once the government passes the tax reform legislation” Zuzolo said if he sees these trends continue in gold, crude and the dollar, then that would signal to him that the market assumes that aggregate demand is going up, global trade will go up and inflation will take a stronger hold in the markets. Higher interest rates, on the other hand, will impact the cost of doing business on the farm. Even though rates are still manageable for producers, Zuzolo said it may be time to take control of some operating costs. “I have been going around the country talking with producers that have a lot of short-term money tied up in operating loans that are not fixed,” Zuzolo said. “If you have any of those type of loans for 2, 5 or even 7 years, I think now is a good time to lock those interest rates in.” Zuzolo said that farmers may be better suited leaving 10, 15 and 30 year loans open at this point. Source: Morning Ag Clips
States Struggle with 2018 Dicamba Application Restrictions
The drama over dicamba herbicide use continued this week as some states wrestled with requiring spray regulations over and beyond new federal labels. Evidence of continued turmoil came on Dec. 12, as an Arkansas Legislative Council subcommittee kicked a proposed ban on in-crop use of the herbicide from April 16 through Oct. 31 back to the Arkansas State Plant Board (ASPB). The committee approved a motion by Sen. Bill Sample (R-Hot Springs) to hold the rule for final consideration and recommended the state board revise it, using the following: scientific-based evidence; a dividing line to create north and south zones in the state; and ambient temperature and humidity applicable to temperature inversion during night-time hours. Earlier Monsanto, the developer of the genetic trait that allows soybeans and cotton to withstand dicamba applications, had asked Pulaski County Circuit Judge Chris Piazza for preliminary and permanent injunctions against the Plant Board’s spray ban. In the lawsuit, Monsanto called the action arbitrary and “not based on science.” A group of farmers has also initiated legal action against the ASPB regarding what would be the nation’s toughest line on dicamba herbicide. The ASPB received nearly 1,000 dicamba-related complaints this year of damage to soybeans, cotton and other sensitive crops and landscape trees and plants. The proposal to limit the application period originated from a specially appointed dicamba task force and was approved on Nov. 8 during a public hearing that attracted hundreds of farmers. The ASPB has met more than 50 times on the issue of dicamba over the past five years, board members told DTN. However, according to news reports, the subcommittee’s vote isn’t final. It is subject to review Friday by the Legislative Council, a group of lawmakers that conducts the General Assembly’s business when it is not in session. ASPB members have indicated to DTN some tweaking of the dates of the ban might be possible without prolonged public comment periods. While Arkansas has been in the dicamba spotlight, other states also are taking action. Last week, weed scientists gathering in St. Louis for the North Central Weed Science Society meeting stressed the need for farmers and retail applicators to monitor specific state requirements that might go over and above new federal restrictions. New federal rules were put into place in October on Engenia, FeXapan and XtendiMax herbicides. Most of the state-by-state changes are being made, they stated, because the federal EPA labels do not address herbicide volatility. The herbicide industry has hotly contested volatility as an explanation for at least some of the more than 2,700 official complaints of injury reported in 2017 across the cotton and soybean belts. MINNESOTA MOVES On Tuesday, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) announced new restrictions on the use of the herbicide dicamba in Minnesota for the 2018 growing season. The decision follows the MDA’s ongoing investigation and an informal survey last summer into reports of crop damage from alleged dicamba off-target movement. In a news release, Minnesota Agriculture Commissioner Dave Frederickson said he thoroughly reviewed the new EPA label restrictions, the MDA’s survey results, peer reviewed literature, and sought extensive input from the Minnesota Soybean Growers Association Drift Task Force, University of Minnesota Extension weed scientists, and the pesticide manufacturers on the underlying causes of damage. Based on the review, the Commissioner set forth these additional protocols for dicamba use for the 2018 growing season: Cutoff date: Do not apply after June 20. Setting an application cutoff date of June 20 is expected to help reduce the potential for volatility (movement). The majority of Minnesota soybeans are still in the vegetative growth stage by June 20 and research has shown that plants in the vegetative stage are less affected than those in the reproductive stage. Cutoff temperature: Do not apply if the air temperature of the field, at the time of application, is more than 85 degrees Fahrenheit or if the National Weather Service’s forecasted high temperature for the nearest available location for the day exceeds 85 degrees Fahrenheit. Research has shown that dicamba volatilization injury increased with an increase in temperatures. “Dicamba is an important tool for soybean growers to manage weeds and I believe these additional restrictions will minimize the off-target movement,” Frederickson said. He added that the state will be closely monitoring the herbicide’s performance with these restrictions in 2018.” STATE BY STATE Indiana, North Dakota, Missouri, and Tennessee are some of the other states that have increased or are in the process of fine-tuning dicamba application restrictions. In Missouri, for example, certified applicators must complete an online Dicamba Notice of Application form daily prior to each application. Cut-off dates for applications in that state also differ by county. In North Dakota, no applications of the three new-generation dicamba herbicides may be made after June 30 or after the first bloom (R1 growth phase), whichever comes first. No applications may be made if air temperature of the field at the time of application is over 85 degrees Fahrenheit or if the forecasted National Weather Service high temperature for the day exceeds 85 degrees Fahrenheit. In writing the regulations, it was noted that North Dakota has a unique climate that is different than other soybean-producing states. The application season typically has low humidity. The dry and less humid environment can significantly increase product evaporation and potential off-target movement. Applications of the product may only be made from one hour after sunrise to one hour before sunset. Applicators must maintain a speed of 12 miles per hour or less when applying products. Applications must be made with a minimum of 15 gallons of spray solution per acre. No applications may be made using nozzles that have an 80-degree or less spray pattern. APPLICABLE TO ALL Anyone buying, applying or even working under the supervision of a certified applicator must complete a dicamba-specific training course, said Kevin Johnson, Illinois Fertilizer and Chemical Association (IFCA) director of government and industry relations. Applicators that cross state lines will need to understand and abide by the specific rules in that state, Johnson added. While farmers hiring custom applicators are not technically required to attend application class, Johnson strongly encourages the training for anyone planning to plant Xtend varieties and potentially use the herbicides labeled for those varieties. “The labels for these products are complex and there may be cases where a commercial applicator cannot spray. The education will help explain those situations,” Johnson said. For more information on state dicamba regulations go to: North Dakota Minnesota Missouri Tennessee Source: Pamela Smith, AgFax
In The Midwest, It?s Not Your Father?s Pigweed
Editor’s Note: Bob Hartzler, Iowa State University weed scientist, used this slide (see below) in a recent presentation, and it caught our eye when he recently posted it on Twitter. The slide says plenty about this history and progression of pigweeds in his state over several decades and it illustrates how much of a hit farmers might take when this weed gets out of hand – particularly Palmer pigweed/amaranth. To further illustrate how pigweed challenges have evolved, Hartzler breaks down 3 pigweeds – redroot pigweed, waterhemp and Palmer – by the generation of farmers most affected by these species. Much like the car commercial – “It’s not your father’s Oldsmobile” – Hartzler shows that Palmer isn’t your grandfather’s pigweed or, for that matter, your father’s pigweed. The table was based on research in 2000 at Kansas State University. Here’s a brief summary from Hartzler that expands on the information on the chart. The pigweeds are fascinating since they demonstrate how small biological differences can make a huge difference in the success of a weed. Both redroot pigweed and waterhemp are native to the Cornbelt. Redroot was the primary pigweed of ag fields of the Cornbelt prior to the 1980s. However, there were other pigweeds (primarily smooth pigweed and Powell’s amaranth) in the region and early agronomists rarely took time to differentiate them. All three of these early pigweeds are monoecious (both male and female flowers on same plant). In the late 1980s we saw a rapid shift from the monoecious pigweeds to waterhemp. The rise of waterhemp as an agronomic problem occurred at the same time as widespread use of ALS inhibiting herbicides – to which the species rapidly evolvled resistance. By the mid-1990s it became difficult to find redroot pigweed in agricultural fields, although it still is present in other disturbed habitats. We don’t fully understand what led to this shift in pigweed species. A paper from Illinois speculated that hybridization between waterhemp and smooth pigweed may have contributed to the adaptation of waterhemp to ag habitats. The emergence of waterhemp as a problem seemed to originate in southern Illinois and then spread across the Cornbelt. Unlike redroot and waterhemp, Palmer amaranth is not native to the Cornbelt, but originated in the Southwest U.S. The expansion of its range began in the early 1900s, although it wasn’t until the mid-1970s when it was reported to be a problem ag weed in the southeastern U.S. In the past 10 to 15 years it began moving northward into the Cornbelt. Iowa’s first detection was in 2013. At this time, it doesn’t appear to be well adapted to soils/climate of the northern Cornbelt (my personal observations, not based on any data). I think it will be a decade or so before it begins to compete with waterhemp as the primary pigweed. Source: AgFax
Nebraska Power Farming Show hosts local vendors
An influx of out-of state visitors to Nebraska in December wasn?t due to their interest in cold weather, but instead the focus of a few short days involving the second largest U.S. indoor farm show in Lincoln. For producers, this means a lot of great products to check out and demonstrations to see, and for local companies it?s a way to showcase their products and get first-hand feedback as well. Read more in this week's print or e-editions. ? Rate this article:  Select ratingGive Nebraska Power Farming Show hosts local vendors 1/5Give Nebraska Power Farming Show hosts local vendors 2/5Give Nebraska Power Farming Show hosts local vendors 3/5Give Nebraska Power Farming Show hosts local vendors 4/5Give Nebraska Power Farming Show hosts local vendors 5/5 No votes yet
Perdue Heads Into 2018 With Only Half of His Executive Team
Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue started work in April as President Trump’s first nominee to the USDA. The former Georgia governor has been short-handed ever since and could finish his first year in office before his executive team is confirmed by the Senate. The eight appointees who serve one step below Perdue (the deputy secretary and seven undersecretaries, each overseeing one of the USDA’s operating arms) are the officials who turn administration policy into action on the ground. Without the decision-makers, the pace slows down and there are fewer chances for farm groups to exchange ideas with the USDA or to get a hint of how impending initiatives will affect producers. “That’s a problem in and of itself,” says NFU government relations director Barbara Patterson, referring to the administration’s slow pace in nominating undersecretaries who need Senate approval. “It’s also a problem at the (agency) administrator level.” Senate action on one nominee for undersecretary, Bill Northey, to run farm support, crop insurance, and land stewardship programs  was blocked in November in oil-state retaliation against the ethanol industry. Perdue wryly says he might wear a “Free Bill Northey” T-shirt in protest. Sam Clovis withdrew his nomination for undersecretary for research because of questions about his work as cochair of the Trump campaign but kept his job as the White House’s political operative at the USDA. That leaves Perdue with three senior executives on the job – Steve Censky, deputy secretary; Ted McKinney, undersecretary for trade; and Gregory Ibach, undersecretary for marketing and regulatory programs – and five vacancies. Besides Northey’s post, arguably as powerful as the deputy secretary, they cover meat safety, ag research, public nutrition, and the Forest Service. “I’m eager to get Secretary Perdue a full team at the Agriculture Department,” says Senate Ag Chairman Pat Roberts. “The Senate Agriculture Committee has acted swiftly on each nomination.” Perdue was Trump’s final cabinet nominee, and there is repeated muttering about whether the USDA has the White House’s attention. Perdue created McKinney’s post as the first step in shaking up the USDA’s organizational tree. He met resistance on Capitol Hill to his elimination of the undersecretary for rural development. Roberts and Senator Debbie Stabenow, the top Democrat on Senate Ag, suggested pointedly that Perdue should ask Congress for a statutory change in Northey’s title and duties. The Iowan was nominated as undersecretary for farm and foreign agricultural services, which includes part of McKinney’s portfolio, but would be undersecretary for farm production and conservation under Perdue’s plan. Until now, conservation programs have been split between two under-secretaries. Northey would receive sole control. This article was produced in collaboration with the Food & Environment Reporting Network, an independent, nonprofit news organization producing investigative reporting on food, agriculture, and environmental health. Source: Agriculture.com
17 Countries Sign Statement Regarding Pesticide Use
The delegations of the United States, Uganda and Kenya are circulating a statement at the 11th World Trade Organization (WTO) Ministerial Conference in Buenos Aires that calls on all members “to strengthen the implementation of the WTO SPS (Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures) Agreement by reinforcing the work of relevant international standards organizations and ensuring the scientific basis of SPS measures is sound.” The statement focuses on pesticide use and its impact on international trade of food and agricultural products. The statement, which is signed by representatives of 17 countries, reads: “We support the voluntary actions by Members put forward by Kenya, Uganda and the United States to increase the capacity and efficiency of Codex in setting international standards on pesticide maximum residue levels (MRLs); to improve transparency and predictability in Members' setting of national MRLs; to achieve greater harmonization across national and regional MRLs; and, to enable greater access to alternative pesticides and pesticides for minor-use crops, particularly in developing countries.” Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue praised the statement, saying, “the development of sanitary and phytosanitary measures (SPS) that are grounded in science is critical to protecting human and environmental health, facilitating trade and enabling agricultural producers to meet the challenge of feeding a growing global population. With this statement, we take a step further in that direction. “We look forward to continued collaboration with the WTO SPS Committee, the Codex Alimentarius Commission and other partners to establish international residue standards that enable the safe use of pesticides and, at the same time, facilitate trade in food and agricultural products.” Countries signing the statement: Brazil, Canada, Uruguay, Costa Rica, Colombia, Madagascar, Panama, Dominican Republic, Peru, Chile, Kenya, Uganda, Argentina, Japan, Guatemala, Paraguay and the United States. What others are saying about the meeting: The U.S. Grains Council President and CEO Tom Sleight thanked the U.S. Trade Representative for defending U.S. ag and food interests. "In particular, the efforts to provide loopholes on domestic price support programs associated with public stockholding programs for food security purposes pose significant trade distortions,” Sleight said. “Without resolving the trade-distorting impacts of these policies, it is impossible to support addressing reforms in overall domestic supports. "The Council strongly supports trade liberalization to help global agriculture collectively address challenges of food security and eradication of poverty by 2050. We can only accomplish those goals if we have an international trade forum to establish disciplines on market access, trade distorting policies and non-tariff barriers.” Source: Southeast Farm Press
3 Steps to Preserve Insect Protection Technologies
The corn industry is announcing the expansion of the Take Action program to help farmers fight insect resistance and preserve the long-term effectiveness of Bt technology. “If we lose the tools we have, there’s a financial risk of facing insects we can no longer control,” says Don Duvall, farmer from Carmi, Illinois, and chairman of the National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) Freedom to Operate action team. “Now is the time to take action before insects become resistant to Bt technology like weeds have become resistant to herbicides.” Through the Take Action program, farmers will have access to the latest tools and information to manage insects and prevent resistance development. Take Action is an industry-wide partnership founded by the soy checkoff that advocates a diverse approach to weed, disease and now insect management to avoid resistance. NCGA and the Agricultural Biotechnology Stewardship Technical Committee (ABSTC), a consortium of Bt corn registrants, are part of the Take Action program that helps farmers develop insect resistance management plans and refuge strategies for their farms. “If we are going to stay ahead of insect resistance, we can’t cut corners,” says Duvall. “Take Action provides information to help farmers meet refuge requirements and preserve this technology for the future.” Take Action advocates three steps farmers can use today to help preserve current insect protection technologies and avoid resistance: Plant the required refuge based on geography and corn product. For corn-growing areas, refuge requirements are 5% or 20%. For cotton-growing areas, refuge requirements are 20% or 50%. Farmers should refer to their corn product’s Insect Resistance Management (IRM) guide for specific refuge details. Use multiple IRM strategies such as crop rotation, using pyramided traits, rotating Bt traits, and rotating and using multiple modes of action for insecticide seed treatments, soil-applied insecticides and foliar-applied insecticides. Scout fields in-season to determine the efficacy of control measures in place and to identify whether further action is necessary for effective control. Farmers interested in learning more about Take Action and insect resistance management can visit http://www.iwilltakeaction.com/. Source: Southeast Farm Press
Mild Weather Pushes Fall Applications
Average retail prices for most fertilizers continued to move higher, while the price for two fertilizers moved lower during the first week of December 2017, according to retailers surveyed by DTN. As has been the case for two weeks in a row, six of the eight major fertilizer prices were higher compared to the previous month. Also, like last week, none of the six were up a noteworthy amount. DAP had an average price of $438/ton, MAP $471/ton, potash $343, urea $344/ton, 10-34-0 $404/ton and anhydrous $424/ton. The two remaining fertilizers were lower in price compared to a month earlier, but once again, neither was down a sizeable amount. UAN28 had an average price of $215/ton while 10-34-0 was at $251/ton. On a price-per-pound of nitrogen basis, the average urea price was at $0.37/lb.N, anhydrous $0.25/lb.N, UAN28 $0.39/lb.N and UAN32 $0.42/lb.N. With harvest completed in most of the Corn Belt and favorable weather hanging on, farmers may consider applying anhydrous before winter weather comes. A recent news article from the University of Missouri Extension titled “Fall Anhydrous Applications Carry Risks and Rewards” looks at the pros and cons of applying the fertilizer in the fall. Andy Luke, University of Missouri Extension regional agronomy specialist, said mild weather into December has allowed fieldwork to continue. Some Missouri farmers chose the fall to apply anhydrous to spread the workload from the busy period and also to take advantage of generally lower fertilizer prices compared to the spring, he said. “What makes fall applications of anhydrous ammonia risky are unknown weather conditions that may lead to N loss before spring,” Luke said. Luke said there are a few steps to lower the risk of leaching or denitrification. First, only apply anhydrous after soil temperatures have reached 50 degrees Fahrenheit and are falling. Secondly, be sure to use a nitrification inhibitor. While they cannot eliminate nitrification completely, inhibitors help to keep it in the immobile ammonium form until it is ready to be used by the crop, he said. Luke also recommended always make sure soil conditions are right and that N is not being lost to volatilization at application. Lastly, do not apply all the N in the fall that you are planning to use for next year’s crops. “Think of a fall application as insurance that N will be available early for the 2018’s corn, but plan to supplement additional N to meet your growing needs,” he advised. To read the entire University of Missouri Extension news article, visit here. Four fertilizer prices are now higher compared to last year. DAP is 1% higher, urea is 3% more expensive, MAP is 6% higher and potash is now 8% more expensive. The remaining four fertilizers are lower compared to a year prior. Both UAN28 and UAN32 are 2% lower while both anhydrous and 10-34-0 are 9% less expensive. DTN collects roughly 1,700 retail fertilizer bids from 310 retailer locations weekly. Not all fertilizer prices change each week. Prices are subject to change at any time. DTN Pro Grains subscribers can find current retail fertilizer price in the DTN Fertilizer Index on the Fertilizer page under Farm Business. Retail fertilizer charts dating back to 2010 are available in the DTN fertilizer segment. The charts included cost of N/lb., DAP, MAP, potash, urea, 10-34-0, anhydrous, UAN28 and UAN32. Source: Russ Quinn, DTN
5 Keys to Managing Kochia in Soybeans
Ranked No. 7 on the Top 10 Most Troublesome Weeds, kochia is well adapted to the Great Plains and western regions of the U.S. and Canada because it is tolerant to hot, dry conditions and soils with high salinity, according to a Fact Sheet published on the University of Missouri Weed Science website. In addition, the evolution of herbicide-resistant kochia is rapid due to high genetic diversity, short seed life, and heavy reliance on herbicides for control in minimum- and no-till cropping systems. Here are five keys to managing kochia: Rotate crops. Crop rotation is important to help diversify kochia-control strategies and herbicide programs over time. More effective kochia herbicides are available in grass crops than in broadleaf crops, especially for postemergence control. A competitive winter wheat crop can greatly suppress kochia emergence and growth. Start clean. It is imperative to control kochia in early spring because of its emergence patterns, dense populations and difficult-to-control large plants. Kochia should be controlled at or before planting. Very few effective postemergence herbicides are available for kochia control in broadleaf crops. Apply an effective soil-applied, pre-emergence herbicide. Kochia can be controlled by a number of residual herbicides if activated before germination. Residual herbicides should be applied in late fall or very early spring to be activated before kochia starts to germinate. Early season control with pre-emergence residual herbicides greatly reduces the reliance on postemergence herbicides for control. Target small weeds after they emerge. Timing of the herbicide application is critical for postemergence control of kochia. To optimize herbicide performance, apply postemergence herbicides with the recommended adjuvants, tank-mix partners, spray volumes, and application guidelines before kochia grows taller than 3-4 inches. Prevent seed production. Kochia is day-length sensitive and begins flowering in late July and August. Due to its short seed life, killing kochia before it flowers and produces seed is an effective way to manage it. Strategic tillage and cover crops might be helpful in minimizing kochia seed production. Fall cover crops can suppress kochia establishment and out-compete young seedlings in the spring. Tillage controls kochia by disrupting the roots and dehydrating plants, but it also depletes soil moisture and leaves soil more vulnerable to wind and water erosion. Source: CropLife
Switches in Corn, Soybeans, and Wheat Acres in the U.S. and Illinois
Since 2012, acres in the U.S. have been shifting out of corn and into soybeans, likely as a result of higher returns for soybeans than for corn. The longer termed trends since 1996 have been increases in corn and soybean acres and decreases in wheat acres. Within Illinois, acreage shifts have been predominately between corn and soybeans. Read the entire article here.
USDA Boosts Corn for Ethanol Forecast
Ethanol is driving up demand for corn in the December supply demand estimate from USDA. The forecast for 2017-18 increases the amount of corn used to produce ethanol by 50 million bushels to 5.525 billion, based on less sorghum going to ethanol production. Corn ending stocks are lowered in turn by 50 million bushels but the impact on the season-average farm price range barely increased at $2.85 to $3.55 per bushel. “While growth in the ethanol market is essential, our farm families also need growth in the livestock and export markets to improve market conditions,” said National Corn Growers Association Chairman Wesley Spurlock, a farmer from Texas. “Whether it be promoting the trade agreements farmers need in Washington or building demand for higher blends of ethanol across the world, NCGA strives to help farmers grow markets for their growing crop.” The 2017/18 corn crop is still estimated at a record 14.78 bushels with a record yield forecast of 175.4 bushels per acre. Ethanol production is also setting records this year. According to the Renewable Fuels Association, ethanol production just hit a new weekly production level of 1.108 million barrels per day (b/d)—or 46.54 million gallons daily. The four-week average for ethanol production increased to a record 1.076 million b/d for an annualized rate of 16.50 billion gallons—about 6% higher than a year ago. Source: AgWired
Iowa Farmland Values Increase After Three Years of Decline
After having fallen in each of the three previous years, the average value of an acre of farmland in Iowa saw an increase in 2017. The average statewide value of an acre of farmland is now estimated to be $7,326. This represents an increase of 2.0 percent, or $143 per acre, from the 2016 estimate. Land values were determined by the 2017 Iowa State University Land Value Survey, which was conducted in November by the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University and Iowa State University Extension and Outreach. Results from the survey are consistent with results by the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, the Realtors Land Institute, and the US Department of Agriculture. Wendong Zhang, Assistant Professor of Economics at Iowa State University, led the annual survey. The $7,326 per acre estimate, and 2.0 percent increase in value, represents a statewide average of low, medium and high-quality farmland. The survey also reports values for each land quality type, crop reporting district (district hereafter), and all 99 counties individually. Starting in 2004, several factors, including the ethanol boom and historically low interest rates, drove five consecutive years of double-digit growth in average farmland values, culminating in an historic peak of $8,716 per acre by 2013. Average farmland values then began an immediate decline, dropping 8.9 percent, 3.9 percent, and 5.9 percent, in the following three years. Those declines were the first time since the 1980s farm crisis that farmland values had declined three consecutive years. Zhang said that limited land supply is the main factor driving this year’s increase in farmland values. “Commodity prices and farm income are still stagnant,” Zhang said. “I would not consider this a turn of the land market. Given the rising interest rates and stagnant farm income, I would not be surprised to see a continued decline in values in the future. This, to me, is a temporary break in a downward adjustment trajectory.” Land Values by County Only four of Iowa’s 99 counties — Fremont, Mills, Montgomery, and Page — reported lower land values this year. Each of those counties reported a decline in value of 0.3 percent. For the fifth year in a row, Scott and Decatur counties reported the highest and lowest farmland values, respectively. Decatur County reported a value per acre of $3,480, a gain of $37, or about 1.1 percent, from last year’s report. Scott County reported a value of $10,497, an increase of $162 per acre, or about 1.6 percent. Dubuque County reported the largest dollar increase in value with a gain of $335 per acre, and Allamakee and Clayton Counties reported the largest percent increase in values, 4.7 percent. Of the four counties that reported a decrease in value, Mills County had the largest dollar decrease in value, losing about $25 per acre. Land Values by District Of the nine crop reporting districts, only the South Central district reported a decrease in average value, with values falling from $4,241 per acre in 2016 to $4,172 in 2017, a loss of 1.6 percent. The Northwest district again showed the highest overall value — $9,388 per acre, up from $9,243 per acre in 2016, a gain of 1.6 percent. The East Central district showed the largest percentage gain in value, 3.8 percent, bringing average value there to $8,218. Land Value by Quality Statewide, high, medium and low-quality farmland values increased 2.0 percent, 2.2 percent, and 0.5 percent, respectively. High-quality farmland saw the largest increase in value in the East Central district, 4.2 percent, and the largest decrease in the South Central district, 1.2 percent. Medium-quality farmland increased the most in the Southeast district, 4.2 percent, and the decreased the most in the South Central district, losing 1.2 percent. Low-quality farmland gained the most value in the Northwest district, 3.3 percent, and decreased the most in the Southwest district, where it fell 6.1 percent. Factors Influencing Land Values The most common positive factors influencing land prices noted by survey respondents were favorable interest rates, strong crop yields, limited land supply, strong demand, and the availability of cash and credit. The most commonly cited negative influences were lower commodity prices, cash or credit availability, high input prices, weak cash rental rates, an uncertain agricultural future and strong alternative (stock market, economy). The ISU land value survey was initiated in 1941, the first in the nation, and is sponsored annually by Iowa State University. The survey is typically conducted every November and the results are released mid-December. Only the state average and the district averages are based directly on the ISU survey data. The county estimates are derived using a procedure that combines the ISU survey results with data from the US Census of Agriculture. The ISU Land Value Survey is based on reports by agricultural professionals knowledgeable of land market conditions such as appraisers, farm managers, agricultural lenders, and actual land sales. It is intended to provide information on general land value trends, geographical land price relationships, and factors influencing the Iowa land market. The 2017 survey is based on 877 usable responses from 710 agricultural professionals. Sixty-four percent of these 710 respondents answered the survey online. Source: Iowa State University Extension
National
Iowa couple sticks with cover crops
An Iowa farm couple isn?t giving up on cover crops.? Bret and Karen Seipold say their first try at cover crops didn?t go as planned, but they were determined to stay with them to improve soil quality and reduce erosion.? The persist with cover crops and other conservation practices on their Southwest Iowa farm.? Bret Seipold says in this feature first aired on Brownfield Ag News in August, he wants to farm with less negative impact on soil. Continue reading Iowa couple sticks with cover crops at Brownfield Ag News.      
Ag, manufacturing, and transportation say NAFTA is necessary
Agriculture, manufacturing, and transportation leaders had a common message for the Trump Administration Friday morning? Don?t walk away from the North American Free Trade Agreement.? Along Milwaukee?s lakefront, business and political leaders agreed that it?s time for the President commit to keeping NAFTA.? One of them is Jeffrey Schwager with Sartori Cheese, who told Brownfield, “To get an agreement done for all of us is important.? Uncertainty kills us.” Schwager says Sartori could lose a large part of their market without NAFTA, saying, “Without a NAFTA agreement, our exports could go (down) in half.” Wisconsin Farm Bureau Federation President Jim Holte tells Brownfield farmers, industry, and workers need to keep telling Washington how vital NAFTA is to them.? Continue reading Ag, manufacturing, and transportation say NAFTA is necessary at Brownfield Ag News.      
La Ni?a expected to continue through winter
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) says there?s an 80 percent chance La Ni?a will continue through the winter. Link Crawford, a hydrometeorologist with Ohio River Forecast Center, says colder temperatures are expected this winter. “NOAA has come out and declared it’s confident?La Ni?a is not ending right away,” he says. “It’s going to stay through the winter and into at least the beginning of spring.” He tells Brownfield it makes sense that La Ni?a conditions are expected to continue. Continue reading La Ni?a expected to continue through winter at Brownfield Ag News.      
Senate Ag Committee tackles security of US agriculture?
Safeguarding the US agriculture industry and food supply system is a big concern as the Senate considers the 2018 Farm Bill. Ranking member of the Senate Ag Committee Debbie Stabenow says food security IS national security and funding and research needs to be strengthened to protect the industry. “Threats to our agriculture industry would not only decimate our economy but also change, frankly, our way of life,” she says. The Senate Ag Committee held a hearing on agriculture security today for the first time in a decade. Continue reading Senate Ag Committee tackles security of US agriculture? at Brownfield Ag News.      
Iowa soybean growers? policy favors trade, conservation incentives
Iowa soybean growers want the administration to know how important trade agreements are to farmers.? Iowa Soybean Association President Elect Lindsay Greiner tells Brownfield the organization set policy specific to the U.S. pulling out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations. ?We?re in favor of expanding trade or any kind of trade we could do with Pacific Rim countries,? Greiner told Brownfield Ag News at the conclusion of the Iowa Soybean Association annual policy conference in Des Moines Thursday, ?and the way commodity prices are now, why of course that would be very important to farmers.? Iowa Soybean farmer delegates also set policy on conservation.? Continue reading Iowa soybean growers’ policy favors trade, conservation incentives at Brownfield Ag News.      
Fuel investment can pay off
A refined fuels expert says spending more on higher-quality diesel reduces potential downtime and expensive repairs. Akhtar Hussain with Minnesota-based CHS tells Brownfield farmers have difficult decisions to make concerning where to reduce expenses while margins remain tight. “So while there are a number of areas to invest, we feel the investment in a Cenex premium diesel fuel is one that is likely to save money in the long-run.” Cenex is the energy brand of CHS. Continue reading Fuel investment can pay off at Brownfield Ag News.      
MacDon sold to fellow Canadian company
A Canadian manufacturer that specializes in harvesting equipment is being sold to another Canadian company. MacDon Industries, headquartered in Winnipeg, has agreed to be purchased by Linamar for close to $940 million. Linamar is based in Ontario and focuses mainly on producing components for the automobile industry. MacDon has customers for its ag equipment products in more than 40 countries, including the U.S., with a network of about 1,400 dealers and distributors globally. Continue reading MacDon sold to fellow Canadian company at Brownfield Ag News.      
Dairy markets down to end the week
Dairy markets ended the week down on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange Friday. December Class III milk futures finished the day down $.01 at ?$15.50. ?After a couple of days with nice gains, January milk was down $.30 closing at $14.40. ?February also lost this week?s gains, closing down $.28 at $14.22. ?March was down $.20 closing at $14.32. ?The rest of the 2018 milk futures were all down except October, which was up a penny. Continue reading Dairy markets down to end the week at Brownfield Ag News.      
Cattle futures close higher on stronger cash trade
At the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, cattle futures ended the week sharply higher on early technical momentum and?today?s better than expected cash trade.? Feeder cattle futures found additional support in Friday?s lower move in corn.?December live cattle closed $2.62 higher at $118.90 and February live cattle closed $1.87 higher at $121.02.??January feeder cattle closed $1.50 higher at $147.75 and March feeder cattle closed $1.20 higher at $145.55. Direct cash cattle trade picked up significantly toward the end of the day.? Continue reading Cattle futures close higher on stronger cash trade at Brownfield Ag News.      
Soybeans, corn weak on rain chances in South America
  Soybeans were fractionally lower on speculative and technical selling, with the most active contracts dropping more than $.20 on the week. Forecasts have more light to moderate rain in dry parts of South America, pushing contracts towards near two month lows. Longer term outlooks remain a little less certain and a mostly drier pattern would be consistent with La Nina conditions. China and unknown destinations bought 2017/18 U.S. beans, 257,000 tons and 126,000 tons, respectively, but this marketing year?s export pace continues to trail last year. Continue reading Soybeans, corn weak on rain chances in South America at Brownfield Ag News.      
USDA withdraws organic rule for livestock and poultry
The USDA has announced its intent to withdraw the proposed organic rule for livestock and poultry.? The Organic Livestock and Poultry Practices rule was finalized in final days of the Obama Administration and was one of several regulations put on hold when the new administration took office. Friday?s move formally terminates the rule. The rule would have added new provisions for livestock handling and transport for slaughter and avian living conditions.? Continue reading USDA withdraws organic rule for livestock and poultry at Brownfield Ag News.      
Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: December 15, 2017
Mar. corn closed at $3.47 and 1/4,?down 1?cent Jan. soybeans closed at $9.67?and 1/4,?down 1/2?cent Jan. soybean meal closed at $320.60,?down?$1.00 Jan. soybean oil closed at 33.16,?down?2?points Mar. wheat closed at $4.18 and 1/4,?unchanged Dec. live cattle closed at $118.90,?up $2.62 Feb. lean hogs closed at $68.52,?up?90?cents Jan. crude oil closed at $57.30,?up?26?cents Mar. Continue reading Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: December 15, 2017 at Brownfield Ag News.      
More corn going into ethanol; ethanol exports grow in importance
A mild surprise in this week?s WASDE report from USDA was the 50 million bushel increase in the estimate of corn that will go into ethanol production this marketing year. University of Illinois ag economist Todd Hubbs says that?s a positive sign for domestic corn use demand. ?Since we?re sort of struggling under the 2.4 billion bushel ending stocks number, any increase is some kind of benefit to maybe driving down those stocks,? Hubbs says. Continue reading More corn going into ethanol; ethanol exports grow in importance at Brownfield Ag News.      
Take Advantage of Variability with Andrew Knaack
Even though it may feel like harvest just finished, now is the perfect time to start planning for spring. With yield results fresh in farmers? minds, the big question remains: how can you use farm data to make management decisions that maximize profitability? On this episode, Andrew Knaack, Climate Business Manager for The Climate Corporation, explains how the easy to use variable rate scripting tools in Climate FieldView? help farmers reduce risk by making the most of their seed investment. Continue reading Take Advantage of Variability with Andrew Knaack at Brownfield Ag News.      
Midday cash livestock markets
Direct cash cattle trade remains quiet with just a few scattered bids on the table.? Packer inquiry is expected to improve throughout the afternoon.? Asking prices are around $119 in the South and $190 plus in the North.? Bids have been reported at $114 live and $184 to $188 dressed. Boxed beef is mixed at the midday on light to moderate box movement.? Choice is up $.75 at $201.79 and Select is $.08 lower at $183.61. Continue reading Midday cash livestock markets at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Don't Prepay 2018 State Income Taxes (And Paul Makes a Mistake)
Some commentators suggested prepaying 2018 state income tax in 2017 to get an extra deduction. The new Tax Bill indicates you can't do that. I also fess up to a mistake in one of my examples from yesterday's post and explain how much interest a farmer can deduct.
Cattle Finish Strong
Cattle ended the week in positive territory, can it carry over into this week?
12 Days of Top Producer Seminar: Live U.S. Farm Report Taping
Top Producer Seminar is the place to gain cutting edge market intelligence.
Farm-to-Table Is a Great Deal for Farmer, If They Can Get It
For an artisanal bread company, the farmer-producer relationship takes more than just separating the wheat from the chaff.
Grain Market Weekend Wrap Up 12.16.17
Grains were softer this week, what does that mean for next weeks trade?
Gulke: Grain Under Pressure with Better Conditions in SA
With South America getting much needed moisture and the market currently looking at more grain supply than demand, pressure continues to weigh on the grains market and soy complex, says Jerry Gulke, president of the Gulke Group. 
Rare IHC 7588 Tractor Sold for $151K Today on Iowa Auction
IHC 7588 4WD tractor, No. 1 of only couple made, sold for whopping $151,000 today on Moravia, IA farm auction by Sullivan Auctioneers. The buyer from North Dakota also bought the 1st Serial Number IHC 7788 and 7388 tractors sold on a Manitoba auction in August 2017
Valent U.S.A. LLC has launched Aveo EZ Nematicide as a biological seed
Valent U.S.A. LLC has launched Aveo EZ Nematicide as a biological seed treatment to fight Soybean Cyst Nematode (SCN), Reniform nematode and others. ?​
The Fertilizer Institute named five farmer and fertilizer retailers pa
The Fertilizer Institute named five farmer and fertilizer retailers pairs who are implementing innovative and sustainable 4R fertilizer management practices.
Three people have been arrested following the latest animal abuse vide
Three people have been arrested following the latest animal abuse video release in Florida.
Jouzge bars are dairy based and intended to be a healthy snack with a
Jouzge bars are dairy based and intended to be a healthy snack with a powerful message.
Cottonseed Glut Cuts Into Both Gin and Grower Budget
The cotton industry is watching budget negotiations in Congress closely. Both the House and the Senate appropriations bills included cotton changes in its proposed bills; however, the text didn’t make the cut in the short-term bill. Now, producers hope cotton-friendly policies get included in the next budget plan which has a fast approaching deadline of December 22, and would avoid a government shutdown.  
Florida Grapefruit Production May Reach 99-Year Low on Storms
Florida Grapefruit Production May Reach 99-Year Low on Storms
Is 2018 looking brighter?