@C - CORN - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Dec '17 351'4 348'4 349'0 0'4
Mar '18 365'0 362'2 362'6 0'4
May '18 373'2 370'6 371'2 0'4
Jul '18 380'0 377'6 378'2 0'4
Sep '18 387'0 384'6 385'2 0'6
Dec '18 396'0 393'4 394'4 1'0
@S - SOYBEANS - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Nov '17 989'0 983'0 986'4 2'2
Jan '18 999'4 994'0 997'0 2'0
Mar '18 1009'2 1003'2 1007'0 2'2
May '18 1018'2 1012'4 1016'0 2'2
Jul '18 1026'2 1020'2 1024'0 2'4
Aug '18 1024'6 1021'0 1024'2 2'4
Sep '18 1014'6 1011'0 1013'0 3'0
@K - HARD RED WINTER WHEAT - KCBT
Month High Low Last Chg
Dec '17 434'2 427'2 429'2 1'2
Mar '18 452'2 445'6 447'2 1'0
May '18 466'0 459'4 461'2 1'0
Jul '18 483'4 478'2 479'2 0'6
@L - LIVE CATTLE - CME
Month High Low Last Chg
Oct '17 112.350 110.600 111.200 -0.275
Dec '17 117.400 115.550 116.150 -0.500
@C - COTTON #2 - ICEFU
Month High Low Last Chg
Dec '17 67.88 67.26 67.31 -0.32
Mar '18 67.50 66.91 67.01 -0.32
May '18 68.41 67.90 68.02 -0.26
DTN Click here for info on Exchange delays.
Local
Midwest Farmers Report Damage from Dicamba
Hundreds of farmers in the Upper Midwest are reporting damage from the controversial herbicide dicamba, and state officials are considering restrictions for the 2018 growing season that might surpass even new federal rules. The state agriculture departments in North Dakota, South Dakota and Minnesota this fall all asked farmers to respond to informal surveys so they could gauge the amount of damage in their states. More than 200 farmers in each state indicated damage. “The whole dicamba situation, it’s something I think about night and day,” said Tom Gere, assistant director of ag services for South Dakota’s Agriculture Department. “We need the technology, with all of the resistant weeds we have out there, but we don’t need the problems that we’ve had this year.” Dicamba has been around for decades for use on crops such as soybeans and corn, but complaints surfaced across the country this summer over drifting of newly registered formulations onto neighboring crops. Officials in some states issued temporary bans on the herbicide. The advocacy group Pesticide Action Network has estimated that more than 3 million acres of crops in at least 20 states were damaged by dicamba drift this year — an area the size of Connecticut. The federal Environmental Protection Agency on Friday announced a deal with the agribusiness giants Monsanto, BASF and DuPont for new voluntary labeling requirements for the chemical for next growing season. Dicamba products will be labeled as “restricted use,” requiring additional training and certifications for applicators and limiting when and how the herbicide can be sprayed. States can go further, even banning the herbicide’s use. That option is a possibility in Minnesota, said Margaret Hart, spokeswoman for that state’s agriculture department. “We’ll take a look at what our investigations brought forth, what the (farmer) survey presented, what the EPA is recommending,” she said. “We’ll take all of that information and use it in the process of making our decision about (dicamba) registration for 2018.” In North Dakota, where farmers this year are expected to harvest a record soybean crop, the Agriculture Department also is drafting state-specific dicamba restrictions. The state will not go so far as to ban the chemical but is likely to fine-tune the federal rules to fit North Dakota weather and geography, according to Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring. “We can be a little more prescriptive in North Dakota,” he said. “We have a pretty good idea, a feel, for where soybeans are grown and what the environmental conditions are.” State officials are striving to finalize their regulations soon. “It’s the time of year when growers are wanting to make decisions for 2018,” Hart said. “We know the urgency of it.” Source: Morning Ag Clips
National
AFAN-WSA annual meeting
Brownfield?s Ken Anderson will be on the ground at the The Alliance for the Future of Agriculture in Nebraska (AFAN) and We Support Ag (WSA) annual meeting in Lincoln, Nebraska on November 20, 2017. Continue reading AFAN-WSA annual meeting at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
College Football Standout Shines In A Different "Field"
James Washington, a senior on the Oklahoma State University football team, was just named to the midseason All-American team.
Facebook
Harvest is in full swing and Chicago markets continue to trade the ...
Harvest is in full swing and Chicago markets continue to trade the narrow range. Nearby corn futures have traded the 20 cent range now for almost 9 weeks. The trade is talking about China?s National Congress meeting and looking for clues from these meetings to see how their economy could be shaped in the coming years. This morning the US Dollar is lower, bond futures are higher and Dow futures are down just over 100 points. Crude oil is trading lower this morning as well. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Dec. Corn at 3.51, +2 ?. Nov. Beans 9.86, + 1 ?, Dec. KC Wheat 4.30 ?, +2 ?.>
Thanks for sharing!
Thanks for sharing!>
It was a busy day in Hubbell along with another successful harvest ...
It was a busy day in Hubbell along with another successful harvest lunch! Thanks to all who stopped by and grabbed lunch with us today! #harvest17>
#harvest17
#harvest17>
Looks like a busy night!!
Looks like a busy night!!>
Harvest is going strong!
Harvest is going strong!>
Thanks for sharing Zach!! Beautiful!
Thanks for sharing Zach!! Beautiful!>
Curry 733-57 was King in these plots in York and Central City. The ...
Curry 733-57 was King in these plots in York and Central City. The right seed on the right acre with the right people helping to boost your yields on your farm! #YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields>
We had another successful tailgate! Big thanks to Tommy and Josh for ...
We had another successful tailgate! Big thanks to Tommy and Josh for stopping by and hanging out with us! ??
Plenty of moisture in the air today #harvest17
Plenty of moisture in the air today #harvest17>
So cute!! Thank you for sharing!
So cute!! Thank you for sharing!>
Here are some maps to help you find our tailgate today in Lincoln! ...
Here are some maps to help you find our tailgate today in Lincoln! Don't forget we have Tommy Armstrong Jr. and Josh Banderas joining us at our tailgate to sign autographs from 3:30 to 5:30!>
It was a busy day at the Sedan terminal! Thank you to everyone who ...
It was a busy day at the Sedan terminal! Thank you to everyone who stopped in and grabbed lunch on us today! #harvest17>
We have some happy farmers at the Grand Island Terminal! Investing in ...
We have some happy farmers at the Grand Island Terminal! Investing in our owners? ability to speed up their harvest! #harvest17>
If you are at the game tomorrow be sure to stop by our tailgate to ...
If you are at the game tomorrow be sure to stop by our tailgate to meet Tommy Armstrong Jr. and Josh Banderas!>
Local
Midwest Farmers Report Damage from Dicamba
Hundreds of farmers in the Upper Midwest are reporting damage from the controversial herbicide dicamba, and state officials are considering restrictions for the 2018 growing season that might surpass even new federal rules. The state agriculture departments in North Dakota, South Dakota and Minnesota this fall all asked farmers to respond to informal surveys so they could gauge the amount of damage in their states. More than 200 farmers in each state indicated damage. “The whole dicamba situation, it’s something I think about night and day,” said Tom Gere, assistant director of ag services for South Dakota’s Agriculture Department. “We need the technology, with all of the resistant weeds we have out there, but we don’t need the problems that we’ve had this year.” Dicamba has been around for decades for use on crops such as soybeans and corn, but complaints surfaced across the country this summer over drifting of newly registered formulations onto neighboring crops. Officials in some states issued temporary bans on the herbicide. The advocacy group Pesticide Action Network has estimated that more than 3 million acres of crops in at least 20 states were damaged by dicamba drift this year — an area the size of Connecticut. The federal Environmental Protection Agency on Friday announced a deal with the agribusiness giants Monsanto, BASF and DuPont for new voluntary labeling requirements for the chemical for next growing season. Dicamba products will be labeled as “restricted use,” requiring additional training and certifications for applicators and limiting when and how the herbicide can be sprayed. States can go further, even banning the herbicide’s use. That option is a possibility in Minnesota, said Margaret Hart, spokeswoman for that state’s agriculture department. “We’ll take a look at what our investigations brought forth, what the (farmer) survey presented, what the EPA is recommending,” she said. “We’ll take all of that information and use it in the process of making our decision about (dicamba) registration for 2018.” In North Dakota, where farmers this year are expected to harvest a record soybean crop, the Agriculture Department also is drafting state-specific dicamba restrictions. The state will not go so far as to ban the chemical but is likely to fine-tune the federal rules to fit North Dakota weather and geography, according to Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring. “We can be a little more prescriptive in North Dakota,” he said. “We have a pretty good idea, a feel, for where soybeans are grown and what the environmental conditions are.” State officials are striving to finalize their regulations soon. “It’s the time of year when growers are wanting to make decisions for 2018,” Hart said. “We know the urgency of it.” Source: Morning Ag Clips
Manage Nutrients to Turn the Tide on Encroaching Regulations
If you think environmental regulation is not a real possibility, think again. The wheels leading to regulation turn slowly, says Farm Journal Field Agronomist Ken Ferrie, but they’re moving. “The Clean Water Act has been on the books since 1972,” Ferrie says. “It has passed through various rewrites and revisions.” Read the entire article here.
When Winterizing Equipment, Think Tires
Combines are wrapping up their business. Grain cart tractors are pulling their last loads. Carts are done hauling. As the grain harvest winds down, many farmers start thinking about storing machines for winter. And there are some factors you may not have considered in the past. There's a good checklist for storing machines for winter. First step is to clean the machine removing any dust and dirt throughout the machine. Given the dusty harvest many producers faced, cleanup is a top priority. And second, you want to top off fluids. Perhaps change the oil if you were close to a service, so you're storing that machine with clean fluid. And make sure tanks are topped off and fuel is stabilized for winter. But what about your tires? For many farmers, the tires on which machines run are almost an afterthought — unless they go flat. But proper storage can help save you trouble when it's time to get back to work next season. "When I talk about winterizing, before we put that piece of equipment away, do a once-over," says Brad Harris, manager, global agricultural field engineering, Firestone Ag. "Do a once-over, and see if there are any major things that would cause the tire not to perform next season." Sounds simple, but the wear tires take these days means farmers should check now: Scheduled downtime is always better than surprise downtime. Harris suggest going over each tire and looking for extra wear. "Look at the sidewalls of the tires and make sure there are no cuts or snags. A superficial cut is not an issue, but deep cuts, where you can see ply cord, are a good indication that there's been damage to the tire," Harris says. He also advises looking at the tread area. He suggests looking at the lug, or skid, depth. "If it is only 20% of what it used to be, you'll probably want to consider purchasing new tires," he notes. "Below that 20%, and if you get into a wetter spring with that tractor, you'll lose traction. You want to make sure that machine is operating at peak performance." Consider the air Looking over tread and sidewalls for damage and excess wear is a simple task. But have you considered the air pressure at storage time? "Make sure the tire still has air in it; we don't want tires sitting flat on heavy axle loads," he notes. Sounds simple, but if you put away a tire at field-pressures — say 15 psi — you could be asking for trouble by spring. Harris explains that a tire will naturally lose 1 to 2 psi per month as air wicks through the sidewalls, or out of the tube. "Naturally, over time, there's loss," he says. "We recommend that when customers put equipment away, they air them up into the 20- to 30-psi range — just so as they go through the winter, they don't go flat." Give the axle loads of some of today's equipment, keeping tires inflated during storage is a good way to preserve that tire investment. Harris adds that the recommendations are the same for bias as well as radial tires. Check their condition, and have them aired up for storage. That should preserve your investment. Source: Willie Vogt, Southeast Farm Press
Iowa Cover Crops: Fall Armyworm Feeding Noted in Southern Counties
Fall is usually not a time I expect to get questions about armyworms, but last week I received several questions about fall armyworms in cover crops, particularly in cereal rye, triticale, or wheat cover crops. In Iowa, fall armyworms can be pests in corn, hayfields and pastures, but this is the first time that I’ve seen them as a pest in cover crops. Fall armyworms are unpredictable pests that do not overwinter in Iowa. While the larvae vary in color, most fall armyworms in the fall are black with three narrow, yellow lines from the head to the end of the abdomen. They also have a wider dark strip and a wavy yellow-red blotched stripe on each side of the body. Their head is dark brown with a prominent inverted “Y” on the face. The adult moths migrate north from the Gulf Coast states. The adults will lay eggs. Those eggs hatch, the larvae feed, and then pupate below the soil surface. Usually in Iowa we only see one generation of fall armyworm per year. Seeing fall armyworms in your cover crop fields this fall is no indication of whether you could potentially have issues with armyworms next spring. Fall armyworm larvae feed on tender green tissues. Windowpane feeding is the first sign of injury. Young larvae feed on the underside of the leaf, but leave the clear upper epidermis intact. This may give the field a “frosted” appearance. As the larvae grow, feeding is usually confined to leaf margins, but larvae can strip plants entirely of leaf tissue. What do you do if you have fall armyworms in your cover crops? Do you need to spray? Will the stand come back? Those are all great questions. Where you may consider spraying is if you are planning on grazing or harvesting the cover crop for forage either this fall or next spring. With spraying, it’s important to consider the size of the larvae. In the fields I’ve looked at, most larvae are at least an inch long or longer. Larvae typically reach a length of 1 ¼ to 1 ½ inches long. Once the larvae get much bigger than ¾ inch long it is harder to control them and their feeding is almost completed. Additionally, fall armyworms cannot survive freezing temperatures. The treatment threshold to spray is three armyworms per square foot. If you do spray, be sure to follow pre-harvest intervals listed in the insecticide label. For cover crop fields with extensive damage and that have been literally chewed to the ground, the question becomes will the cover crop come back? The growing point of cereal grains would still be below the ground, especially if the field was drilled, as the growing point doesn’t move above the soil surface until it reaches the jointing stage, which occurs in the spring. This is good news because it means the plants will continue to grow. However, as long as armyworms are still present in the field they will continue to eat off the new growth. Stand loss may be affected by how much regrowth there is before winter dormancy is induced. Source: Rebecca Vittetoe, Iowa State University Extension
Harvest is in full swing and Chicago markets continue to trade the ...
Harvest is in full swing and Chicago markets continue to trade the narrow range. Nearby corn futures have traded the 20 cent range now for almost 9 weeks. The trade is talking about China?s National Congress meeting and looking for clues from these meetings to see how their economy could be shaped in the coming years. This morning the US Dollar is lower, bond futures are higher and Dow futures are down just over 100 points. Crude oil is trading lower this morning as well. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Dec. Corn at 3.51, +2 ?. Nov. Beans 9.86, + 1 ?, Dec. KC Wheat 4.30 ?, +2 ?.>
Thanks for sharing!
Thanks for sharing!>
It was a busy day in Hubbell along with another successful harvest ...
It was a busy day in Hubbell along with another successful harvest lunch! Thanks to all who stopped by and grabbed lunch with us today! #harvest17>
USDA Crop Progress Shows Corn Harvest at 28% Complete
Last Thursday, USDA revised corn yield estimates up nearly 2 bushels, to a robust 171.8 bpa. Now if farmers could only get the crop harvested. Several rounds of wet weather over the past two weeks have kept harvest progress slow. The latest USDA Crop Progress report, issued Oct. 16, indicates just 28% of the corn crop is harvested – 6% better than a week ago, but well behind the five-year average of 47%. Some major grain-producing states have harvested less than 20% of their crop, including Iowa (13%), Michigan (19%), Minnesota (7%), North Dakota (8%), South Dakota (12%) and Wisconsin (9%). Meantime, some southern states are wrapping up their 2017 corn harvests, with North Carolina (92%) and Tennessee (91%) leading the way. And for a second consecutive week, USDA upwardly revised its quality assessment of the corn crop, raising the percent rated good to excellent from 64% to 65%. Meantime, only 11% of the crop is rated poor to very poor. Ahead of the report, a group of 11 industry analysts predicted corn harvest had progressed to 32% complete, with an estimated range of 28% to 35%. The group of analysts also estimated corn’s “good to excellent” rating would remain unchanged at 64%. Farm Futures estimated corn harvest progress at 32% complete with a G/E rating of 64%. “Corn yield potential improved last week with only two states seeing a decline – Illinois and Nebraska,” according to Farm Futures senior grain market analyst Bryce Knorr. “Our yield estimates based on ratings improved nearly a full bushel per acre, with the range from 167.4 bpa to 169.6 bpa. Corn harvest remains well below average above the Mason-Dixon line, with many states lagging the five-year average by double digits. States in the northwest part of the growing region remain the most behind.” Soybean harvest neared the halfway mark, jumping ahead from 36% complete last week to 49% this week. That still keeps it well behind 2016’s pace of 59% and the five-year average of 60%. Every state is at least one-quarter complete at this point, with several southern states near the finish line. The percentage of soybeans in good-to-excellent remained steady from a week ago, at 61%. However, the distribution shifted slightly, with excellent-rated soybeans up 1% to 13% of the U.S. crop, and good-rated soybeans down 1% to 48% of the U.S. crop. States with the highest levels of excellent-rated soybeans include Tennessee (33%), Minnesota (27%), Wisconsin (26%), Illinois (19%) and Arkansas (18%). Ahead of the report, a group of 11 analysts estimated the U.S. soybean harvest had advanced to 49% complete and gauged the quality of the 2017 crop at 61% rated good to excellent. Farm Futures estimated 53% soybean harvest progress and a 61% G/E rating. “Soybean yield potential was slightly higher this week, gaining less than one-tenth of a bushel per acre,” Knorr said. “Our estimates based on the ratings range from 47.5 bpa to 48.6 bpa. Harvest is behind in most of the western states.” Winter wheat planting has reached 60% complete, up from 48% a week ago, but behind 2016’s pace of 70% and a five-year average of 71%. Analysts had estimated winter wheat planting progress reached 63%, with estimates that ranged between 60% and 69%. “Hard red winter wheat seeding remains slow over most of the Plains, especially in the key state of Kansas,” Knorr said. “However, slow planting statistically is correlated with above-average yields in Kansas because delays normally occur when fields are wet, which in the long run is a benefit to the crop.” Source: Southeast Farm Press
USDA Withdraws GIPSA Rule
The U.S. Department of Agriculture Oct. 17 announced it is withdrawing the Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration interim final rule regarding the scope of the Farmer Fair Practices Rules of the Packers and Stockyards Act, and will not finalize the rules. The rules, often called the Farmer Fair Practices Rules, were intended to enhance the power of livestock growers in relationships with buyers and processors. While the GIPSA rules on Unfair Practices and Undue Preferences in Violation of the Packers and Stockyards Act won’t be finalized, GIPSA’s proposed rule on Poultry Grower Ranking Systems is still under consideration. Colin Woodall, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association’s senior vice president for government affairs, said in a release, “This is a victory for America’s cattle and beef producers—and it’s a victory for America’s consumers. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue deserves a great deal of thanks and credit for this smart decision. “The proposed rule would have crippled cattle producers’ ability to market their products through the value-added programs that help make American-produced beef the most delicious and nutritious in the world. This is a decision worthy of celebrating this evening with a top-quality steak.” The United States Cattlemen’s Association President Kenny Graner said his group was disappointed with the announcement. “The proposed and interim rules sought to maintain competition in the marketplace; withdrawing the rule is a win for multi-national packers and fails to put U.S. cattle producers first,” Graner said. “USCA has been committed to seeing through necessary clarifications to the Packers and Stockyards Act and a withdrawal of the rule does not solve the problems in today’s marketplace. “Anti-competitive buying practices and the lack of true price discovery remain critical issues to our industry and ones that must be addressed. The issues remain the same, regardless of (the) announcement, and USCA will look to work with industry, Congress, and the administration on addressing the loopholes still remaining by the result of withdrawing the rule.” National Pork Producers Council President Ken Maschhoff, a pork producer from Carlyle, Illinois, said, “We’re very pleased that the secretary will withdraw these bad regulations, which would have had a devastating impact on America’s pork producers. The regulations would have restricted the buying and selling of livestock, led to consolidation of the livestock industry—putting farmers out of business—and increased consumer prices for meat.” National Farmers Union President Roger Johnson responded to the announcement, saying, “It is deeply disappointing that USDA did not side with family farmers in the long-contested debate over rules for the Packers and Stockyards Act. The Farmer Fair Practices Rules offered a basic, yet important first step to addressing the unfair practice that family farmers and ranchers face in the extremely consolidated meatpacking industries. “The withdrawal of the competitive injury rule is unjustified, given the long-held, plain language interpretation by the Department that growers do not need to prove harm to the entire industry when seeking relief from poultry companies for unfair contract practices. It is particularly egregious given the abuses that poultry growers face in the vertically integrated marketplace. “With this decision, USDA has given the green light to the few multinational meatpackers that dominate the market to discriminate against family farmers. As the administration has signaled its intent to side with the meat and poultry giants, NFU will pursue congressional action that addresses competition issues and protects family farmers and ranchers.” Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts, R-KS, commended USDA for rolling back the rule. “Rural America has received long-awaited good news,” Roberts said in a news release. “In the heartland, farmers and ranchers applaud the rollback of the ‘GIPSA’ rules. “The Obama administration spent the better part of a decade ignoring the calls from farmers, ranchers, and agriculture economists warning of the billion dollar blow this rule would have levied against American agriculture,” Roberts said. “Secretary Perdue’s actions today demonstrate the Trump administration’s commitment to promoting economic prosperity and reducing regulatory burdens in rural America.” House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway, R-TX, and House Agriculture Livestock and Foreign Agriculture Subcommittee Chairman David Rouzer, R-NC, also praised the decision. “After nearly a decade of battling partisan and contentious GIPSA reforms, America’s livestock, poultry and packing industries can breathe a sigh of relief,” Conaway said. “(This) decision helps restore both Congressional intent and common sense by ensuring American producers have the freedom to market their products without the threat of frivolous lawsuits,” Conaway said. “I appreciate the Trump administration’s dedication to regulatory reform through the rollback of unnecessary and burdensome regulations like these. I am particularly thankful for Secretary Perdue’s leadership on this effort and look forward to working with him to ensure that other problematic regulations like the organic livestock rule meet the same fate.” Said Rouzer, “Excessive regulations with questionable legal backing ultimately lead to a wave of lawsuits and to years of litigation. The withdrawal of the GIPSA rule brings years of regulatory uncertainty in our livestock, poultry and packing industries to an end. I applaud the Trump administration, along with Secretary Perdue, for their hard work on behalf of rural America to roll back these cumbersome regulations,” Rouzer said. Source: Larry Dreiling, High Plains Journal
Conditions Cause Concern for High Plains Corn Producers
Corn producers in the High Plains wait out wet weather and potentially problematic conditions as global commodity market conditions worsen for U.S. producers, according to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service experts. Dr. Jourdan Bell, AgriLife Extension agronomist, Amarillo, said rain has been a complication for corn farmers in the region. Significant rains have prevented producers from accessing fields, and wet conditions were slowing corn dry down in preparation for harvest. Rain has also led to high levels of fusarium, or ear rot, in corn. The state is also testing aggressively for the mycotoxin fumonisin, which can be deadly to animals, in those corn fields, she said. “Fusarium is the mold that releases fumonisin mycotoxin, which is why there have been concerns about mycotoxins in High Plains corn,” she said. Dr. Mark Welch, AgriLife Extension state grain marketing economist, College Station, said the quality of the corn will determine whether corn from those fields can be consumed. Corn from those fields have historically provided feed for beef cattle in the region, but there is also demand from a growing dairy industry there. “The mycotoxin tolerances established by the U.S. Department of Agriculture are lower for dairies than in beef, and they have to make sure the corn has low enough levels of mycotoxin to go to either,” he said. “It’s been so wet that there’s widespread concern, but it’s too early to say because there hasn’t been a major harvest push because farmers can’t access fields.” Welch said grain production overall was down, as producers switched to cotton. Texas corn acreage was down 400,000 acres to 2.1 million acres compared to 2.5 million acres in 2016. Overall, Texas corn was on pace for a good year, he said. Earlier-planted fields in South Texas performed very well. “Moisture was adequate and there wasn’t excessive heat early,” he said. “It looks to be a good corn year for most of the state.” Prices could still be problematic for producers, Welch said. Early problems in domestic corn — drought in the western Corn Belt and excessive rain in the eastern Corn Belt – meant low expectations, but USDA reports for October indicated those fields recovered. International competition could add volatility to grain prices, he said. Argentina and Brazil have combined to export more corn than the U.S. over the last several years, and South American corn offers U.S. export customers an alternative source of supply given transportation costs, variable exchange rates and overall relations tied to trade agreements and international cooperation. “The U.S. has long been the leader in the corn market,” he said. “We are the world’s No. 1 producer, user and exporter. But having Argentina and Brazil combine for such a big crop increases competition.” AgriLife Extension district summaries can be found here. Source: Texas AgriLife Extension
33 Senators Ask Trump Administration to Increase U.S. Biodiesel Volumes
A bipartisan group of senators are calling on the Trump administration to increase the amount of biofuels in the nation’s fuel supply. U.S. Sens. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N., Roy Blunt, R-Mo., Patty Murray, D-Wash., and Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, led a bipartisan group of 29 other senators urging the Environmental Protection Agency to increase its proposed 2019 Renewable Volume Obligations (RVOs) for biodiesel to encourage growth in the industry and diversity in the nation’s energy supply, and to abandon its effort to reduce biofuel production in 2018. The EPA has proposed holding the biomass-based diesel volume stagnant for 2019 and reducing the advanced biofuel volume for 2018. These proposed volumes leave potential growth in the industry on the table and could cause near-term job losses in rural America. “The industry is poised for growth, in accordance with the intent of the law, if EPA sends the market signals with increased volumes. Reducing volumes and especially those RVOs that were previously finalized is disruptive, unprecedented, and very troubling,” the senators wrote to EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt. The senators continued, “We have made great progress through the RFS in diversifying our nation’s fuel supply while creating and sustaining jobs, strengthening local economies, generating tax revenues, and improving energy security. We urge you to support higher RVOs for biomass-based diesel and advanced biofuels in the final rule to encourage additional development and use of this fuel.” According to a study conducted last year by LMC International and released by the National Biodiesel Board, the 2.1 billion gallons of biodiesel and renewable diesel used by Americans in 2015 supported 47,400 jobs and $1.9 billion in wages, and had an $8.4 billion economic impact. The full text of the letter is below: Dear Administrator Pruitt: We write in response to the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) proposed Renewable Volume Obligations (RVOs) for advanced biofuel for calendar year 2018 and biomass-based diesel for calendar year 2019, as well as the recent Notice of Data Availability (NODA). The NODA requests comments on reducing previously finalized RVOs, threatening business plans and investments already made based upon a final rule issued in December 2016. These proposed volumes do not meet actual biodiesel production capacity in the United States, and could have a negative impact on jobs and economies in rural communities across the nation. Therefore, we urge you to increase these volumes in the final rule. Biodiesel is the first EPA-designated advanced biofuel under the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) to reach commercial scale production nationwide. The biodiesel industry has met RFS criteria for growth each year, exceeding the goals that Congress envisioned when it created the RFS with bipartisan support. In addition, biodiesel has consistently made up the majority of the advanced biofuel volumes. This ability to meet or exceed RVOs coupled with the substantial investment made by the biodiesel industry indicate that these fuels offer the best opportunity for continued growth in the near future. EPA’s proposal would hold the biomass-based diesel volume for 2019 stagnant at 2.1 billion gallons and decrease the advanced biofuel volume for 2018 to 4.24 billion gallons. These proposed volumes do not reflect the existing potential for the biodiesel and renewable diesel industries in our states and could cause near-term job losses and discourage investment in capacity and new fuel development. It is estimated that every 500 million gallons of increased biodiesel production supports roughly 16,000 jobs. Further, EPA’s NODA solicits comments on whether it could further reduce the total, advanced, and biomass-based diesel volumes through several different waiver mechanisms. However, there is ample available feedstock, refining capacity, and room for growth in the domestic biodiesel industry. The industry is poised for growth, in accordance with the intent of the law, if EPA sends the market signals with increased volumes. Reducing volumes and especially those RVOs that were previously finalized is disruptive, unprecedented, and very troubling. We have made great progress through the RFS in diversifying our nation’s fuel supply while creating and sustaining jobs, strengthening local economies, generating tax revenues, and improving energy security. We urge you to support higher RVOs for biomass-based diesel and advanced biofuels in the final rule to encourage additional development and use of this fuel. Thank you for your consideration. Sincerely, Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND) Roy Blunt (R-MO) Patty Murray (D-WA) Charles E. Grassley (R-IA) Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) Joni K. Ernst (R-IA) Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) Deb Fischer (R-NE) Sherrod Brown (D-OH) John Hoeven (R-ND) Maria Cantwell (D-WA) Jerry Moran (R-KS) Susan M. Collins (R-ME) Joe Donnelly (D-IN) Pat Roberts (R-KS) Tammy Duckworth (D-IL) John Thune (R-SD) Richard J. Durbin (D-IL) Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) Al Franken (D-MN) Martin Heinrich (D-NM) Mazie K. Hirono (D-HI) Angus S. King, Jr. (I-ME) Amy Klobuchar (D-MN) Claire McCaskill (D-MO) Christopher S. Murphy (D-CT) Gary C. Peters (D-MI) Jack Reed (D-RI) Bernard Sanders (I-VT) Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) Sheldon Whitehouse (D-RI) Ron Wyden (D-OR) Source: Farm Futures
#harvest17
#harvest17>
Avoid Soybean Loss During Harvesting, Drying, Storage
Harvest timing can have a huge impact on soybean shatter losses, according to North Dakota State University Extension Service agricultural engineer Ken Hellevang. “Field losses, splits and cracked seed coats increase as moisture content decreases,” he says. “Shatter losses have been shown to increase significantly when seed moisture falls below 11 percent or when mature beans undergo multiple wetting and drying cycles.” Because harvest losses increase dramatically when the moisture content is below 11 percent, harvesting during high humidity such as early morning or late evening or damp conditions may reduce shatter loss, Hellevang notes. Many times, the discount for delivering beans with a moisture content in excess of 13 percent may be less than the discount for shatter losses from harvesting overly dry soybeans. He recommends that producers begin harvesting at 14 or 15 percent moisture to reduce the amount harvested below 11 percent. Moisture content can increase by several points with an overnight dew or it can decrease by several points during a day with low humidity and windy conditions. Avoid harvesting when beans are driest, such as afternoons, to maintain moisture and reduce shattering losses. Changing Color “Unfortunately, there has not been adequate research examining if immature green soybeans will change color in storage,” Hellevang says. “Limited studies indicate that green soybeans will tend to stay green in storage. They do not lose their internal green color caused by chlorophyll, although the surface color may lighten or mottle somewhat after weeks or months in storage.” Field losses need to be balanced against the discounts for green seeds in determining when to harvest. Another possibility is harvesting some of the field and leaving the portion with the green soybeans unharvested, he says. Equalizing Moisture Content Soybean moisture variation may lead to storage and marketing losses. Operating an aeration fan will help move moisture from wet beans to drier beans. Air going past wet beans picks up moisture, and that moisture will transfer to drier beans as the air goes past them. Moisture movement will be minimal without aeration airflow. Hellevang suggests initially running the fan longer than is required to cool the grain to even out the moisture content. The moisture will not be all the same, but it should become more uniform. Soybeans at 11 percent moisture have similar storage characteristics as wheat or corn at 13.5 to 14 percent moisture, so an allowable storage time (AST) chart for cereal grains can be used to estimate allowable storage times for soybeans. For example, soybeans at 16 percent moisture content would be similar to cereal grains at about 19 percent moisture, so soybeans would be expected to have an AST of about 70 days at 50 degrees. The AST is reduced to 35 days at 60 degrees and extended to about 140 days at 40 degrees. Drying Options The recommended maximum moisture content for air-drying is about 16 percent moisture, with an airflow rate of at least 1 cubic foot per minute per bushel (cfm/bu) during October. The amount of natural-air drying that will occur in late October and November is limited in northern states. The equilibrium moisture content of soybeans for air-drying at 40 degrees and 70 percent relative humidity is 13.7 percent, but even with an airflow rate of 1 cfm/bu, drying soybeans with 16 percent moisture will take about 70 days. Adding supplemental heat to raise the air temperature by 5 degrees will permit drying the soybeans to about 11 percent moisture in about 55 days. Only about one-half of the beans would be expected to dry by mid-November, when outdoor temperatures become too cold to dry efficiently. Adding heat would cause the beans on the bottom of the bin to be dried to a lower moisture content and it would increase drying speed only slightly. Cool the soybeans to between 20 and 30 degrees for winter storage and complete drying in the spring. Hellevang recommends starting to dry when outdoor temperatures are averaging about 40 degrees. Increasing the airflow rate will increase the drying speed. However, the fan horsepower required to achieve the higher airflow rate becomes excessive unless the grain depth is very shallow. For a soybean depth of 22 feet, the rule of thumb is that each 1,000 bushels of soybeans will need about 1 horsepower of fan to achieve an airflow rate of 1 cfm/bu. Achieving an airflow rate of 1.5 cfm/bu will require about 2.5 horsepower per 1,000 bushels, and an airflow rate of 2 cfm/bu will need about 5 horsepower per 1,000 bushels. The type of fan greatly affects the airflow provided per horsepower, so use a fan selection software program such as the one developed by the University of Minnesota. It is available on the NDSU grain drying and storage website (https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/graindrying). Soybeans can be dried in a high-temperature dryer, but the temperature needs to be limited to minimize damage to the beans. Refer to the manufacturer’s recommendations for maximum drying temperature. Typically, the maximum drying temperature for nonfood soybeans is about 130 degrees. Even at that temperature, some skins and beans will be cracked. One study found that with a dryer temperature of 130 degrees, 50 to 90 percent of the skins were cracked and 20 to 70 percent of the beans were cracked. Another study found that 30 percent of the seed coats were cracked if the drying air relative humidity was 30 percent, and 50 percent of the skins and about 8 percent of the beans were cracked at 20 percent relative humidity. The relative humidity is reduced by one-half for each 20 degrees that the air is warmed. Therefore, if air at 40 degrees and 80 percent relative humidity is warmed to 60 degrees, the relative humidity is reduced to 40 percent, and if it is heated to 80 degrees, the relative humidity is reduced to 20 percent. Monitor the amount of damage occurring during drying and regulate the temperature to obtain the acceptable amount of damage. Most dryer fires occur due to trash accumulating in the dryer. Monitor the grain flow in the dryer and periodically clean the dryer to reduce the potential for a fire. Food soybeans and seed beans must not have damage to the seed coat, so natural-air or low-temperature drying is the preferred drying method, Hellevang says. For more information, do an Internet search for NDSU soybean drying. Source: North Dakota State University
Moving Forward After the October Reports
The release of USDA’s October reports created a rally in soybean prices that pushed November soybean futures prices to levels not seen since the end of July. Corn prices saw a much more muted response. The question is will the soybean rally consolidate as we move forward. Corn prices appear to contain a limited capability to generate upward price movements in the near term. The October soybean production forecast of 4.431 billion bushels came in at the same level as the September production forecast. While the production level was the same, harvested acres increased 740,000 acres while national average yield declined by 0.4 bushels to 49.5. The reduction in yield level combined with the lowering of 2017-18 ending stocks by 44 million bushels, to 430 million bushels, provided the impetus for the price rally. The projections for 2017-18 marketing year consumption stayed at September levels with the ending stocks reduction being composed entirely of lower beginning stocks, at 301 million bushels. The USDA will provide new yield and production forecasts on November 9. During the last 20 years, the forecast of the U.S. average soybean yield increased in September and decreased in October, like this year, in three years. In each of those years, the November yield forecast was smaller than the October forecast. The average decrease in November was 0.26 bushels with a range of 0.1 to 0.5 bushels. The final yield estimate released in January was below the November forecast once in those years. At this time, a drastic change in projected soybean yield for the 2017 crop appears unlikely. The current information provides no clear indication of an increase in demand for soybeans higher than the current USDA projection. It is tempting to look at the decreases in ending stocks over the course of the previous four marketing years and project a lower 2017-18 ending stocks level than the current 430 million bushel forecast. On average over the last four years, soybean ending stocks decreased approximately 45 percent from the October WASDE projection to the final ending stocks estimate for the marketing year. If this pattern held for this marketing year, soybean ending stocks would come in at around 236 million bushels at the end of 2017-18. The market has grown accustomed to upward revisions in soybean exports and downward revisions in ending stocks over the last few marketing years. A difference this year is the current USDA projection for soybean exports sits at 2,250 million bushels, a record level for soybean exports and 3.5 percent higher than last marketing year’s export level. Current export inspections for soybeans for the week ending October 12 are running 7.6 percent lower than last year’s inspection level pace. The recent demand for soybeans in export markets is a positive sign but to see export levels increased above the current record projection requires an upturn in the pace of exports. At 14.280 billion bushels, USDA’s October forecast of the U.S. corn crop was 96 million bushels larger than the September forecast. U.S. average yield increased 1.9 bushels to 171.8, while harvested acres decreased by 377,000 acres. The 2017-18 marketing year consumption forecast increased by 35 million bushels, to 14.285 billion bushels. The USDA increased the forecasts for feed and residual use by 25 million bushels and food, seed, and industrial use by 10 million bushels. Projected ending stocks for 2017-18 changed very little with an increase of 5 million bushels to 2,340 million bushels. Some help was provided by lower beginning stocks, at 45 million fewer bushels than September estimates. Corn price will require strong demand throughout this marketing year to lift prices in any sustainable manner, particularly if production continues to increase in the U.S. During the last 20 years, the forecast of the U.S. average corn yield increased in September and October, like this year, in seven years. In five of those years, the November yield forecast was greater than the October forecast. The average increase in November was 1.72 bushels with a range of 0.4 to 3.5 bushels. The final yield estimate released in January was below the November forecast once in those five years. The potential for a larger corn crop is continuing to develop and looks more likely given many of the yield reports coming out of the Corn Belt. The rally in soybean prices provides producers with the opportunity to lock in prices for 2017 soybean production. To sustain this price rally, soybean production levels in the U.S. will need to stay at current levels, and robust export demand will need to develop throughout the marketing year. Corn prices will struggle to find support in the short run due to large corn stocks and the prospect of increasing production for the 2017 corn crop. Source: Todd Hubbs, University of Illinois
Satellite Imagery at Your Fingertips
Farmers are learning that aerial imagery, no matter how collected, can be helpful for in-season decision-making. That's a key with today's modern precision ag movement: in-season actions to boost current year results. But capturing imagery can be a challenge, whether by drone, satellite or airplane. That challenge may have been answered. Farmers Edge, a farm management technology company, has signed a sole distributorship agreement with Planet, a company that is changing how satellite imagery is being captured. "We have 190 satellites in orbit now, and in the past year we've put up 136. We're able to image the entire earth on a daily basis," says Andrew Pylypchuk, account executive, Planet. He explained that the big change is the way Planet designs and builds a satellite. No longer do satellites need to be single purpose behemoths, launched by NASA. Instead, the company is using off-the-shelf components to create bread-loaf-sized information-gatherers to create a constellation of imaging systems in the sky. Farmers Edge will be the sole distributor of the imagery product to other users, but the firm has also incorporated the imagery into its FarmCommand management platform. "From the time we started the company, we have focused on satellite imagery to make management zones," says Wade Barnes, president and CEO, Farmers Edge. Yet that early work wasn't without its frustrations, as image providers were unable to deliver reliably on promises, Barnes says. Planet provides daily images that farmers can view in FarmCommand. "And even if it isn't a great image every day, getting good images three or four days a week is often enough," Barnes adds. Farmers Edge has been showing farmers the imagery platform in test. "In our work with farmers demonstrating the imagery, they comment that 'This is addicting,' and they can do what they've never been able to do," Barnes adds. He points to early instances where agronomists on the ground were able to spot and identify early cutworm damage in wheat very early, which allowed for faster treatment. Bring satellite imagery back The concept of satellite imagery for ag management isn't new, but the rise of drones, and innovators with airplane-captured imagery, have brought renewed interest in all things aerial. Yet Barnes admits that agronomists have walked away from satellite imagery in the past, due to unmet promises. "A lot of agronomists and consultants are done with satellites, and they do not see it as a tool," Barnes says. "And they're concerned about using drones to capture images, too. It can be expensive." Daily satellite imagery — at the 3-meter level — may change that. Barnes explains that there are so many images that farmers can't possibly check on all fields every day. "We're working on a way to alert farmers in our system to changes in their fields as captured by the images," he says. That "visual analysis" is planned for 2018. It would essentially use the FarmCommand platform to provide an alert to a farmer if there's a sign of distress in a satellite image from one capture to the next. Farmers, or their agronomists, could then review the images to determine if there's a problem that needs addressing. A dashboard of images During a demonstration of the Farmers Edge platform, which works to pull in data from a range of sources, Farm Progress got a look at a system that gives a farmer quick access to critical information all season long. In addition, the company has a nitrogen use model to help manage crop fertility all season. The platform gathers information from satellites, but also from in-machine ISOBUS connectors that use telemetry to broadcast information to the FarmCommand system. There are also on-farm weather stations to capture local information as well. The result is a dashboard where a farmer can manage the farm — from phone, tablet or desktop — all season long. From growth stages for crops by field to weather impact on returns, the system is pulling a lot of information into a single place. The added depth of daily satellite imagery just adds to what the company plans to offer. A key feature is the growth-stage model, which Richard Marsh, product manager, explains is expanding. "We will have growth-stage models for 10 crops in 2018," he says. "We based crop staging models on where the crop is grown and the seeding date." The system, using weather data, planting date and growing degree days, can allow farmers to check on field progress across the farm. The growth models take into account specific hybrid or variety information — provided by the farmer, Marsh explains. Going into 2018, knowing specific details of fertility use, crop progress, and pest infestation gets easier as crop management platforms evolve. Farmers Edge kicks it up a notch with enhanced daily aerial imagery. Learn more about their system at farmersedge.ca. Source: Southwest FarmPress
National
AFAN-WSA annual meeting
Brownfield?s Ken Anderson will be on the ground at the The Alliance for the Future of Agriculture in Nebraska (AFAN) and We Support Ag (WSA) annual meeting in Lincoln, Nebraska on November 20, 2017. Continue reading AFAN-WSA annual meeting at Brownfield Ag News.      
Midday livestock markets
Direct cash cattle trade is quiet with just a few scattered bids in parts of Kansas and Nebraska and $109.00 to $110.00 live and $172.00 dressed.? There was some light scattered trade reported yesterday ? the majority of cattle moved were in Texas with just over 2,000 head sold at $110.00 about $1.00 lower than last week?s weighted average.? Asking prices are holding firm at $112.00 to $113.00 in the South and $178.00 plus in the North. Continue reading Midday livestock markets at Brownfield Ag News.      
Wisconsin hemp bill passes Senate Ag Committee
Wisconsin?s Industrial Hemp bill has made it through the Senate Ag Committee.? Republican Senator Patrick Testin is a co-author of the bill, and he is pleased with its progress.? “I feel very optimistic and I think we’ll be able to get this on the floor at the end of this month or early November for a vote in the full Senate.? The bill has some challenges, including concerns by Senator Kathleen Vinehout about requiring tribes to get a license from the Department of Ag.? Continue reading Wisconsin hemp bill passes Senate Ag Committee at Brownfield Ag News.      
2017 USDA Data Users Meeting
Brownfield?s Tom Steever will be on site at the Embassy Suites Kansas City Plaza, Kansas City on October 24 for the 2017 USDA Data Users Meeting. Continue reading 2017 USDA Data Users Meeting at Brownfield Ag News.      
Wheat, corn exports top estimates
The USDA reports corn, wheat, and soybean product export sales for the week ending October 12th were above most pre-report estimates, while soybean sales were generally below expectations. Wheat came out at 615,400 tons (22.6 million bushels), up sharply from the week ending October 5th and 75% higher than the four week average. Mexico purchased 180,000 tons and China bought 120,000 tons, while Turkey canceled on 50,000 tons. At this point in the 2017/18 marketing year, wheat sales are 543.9 million bushels, compared to 566.7 million in 2016/17. Continue reading Wheat, corn exports top estimates at Brownfield Ag News.      
Wisconsin Livestock Identification Consortium meeting
Brownfield Anchor/Reporter Larry Lee will cover the Wisconsin Livestock Identification Consortium meeting in Sun Prairie on October 25, 2017.     Continue reading Wisconsin Livestock Identification Consortium meeting at Brownfield Ag News.      
Senate Ag Committee to vote on Northey, Ibach nominations
USDA undersecretary nominees Bill Northey and Greg Ibach are expected to receive Senate Ag Committee confirmation today. Committee leaders say they will hold a business meeting this afternoon to consider the nominations. Iowa ag secretary Northey has been picked to oversee USDA?s Farm and Foreign Agricultural Services, while Nebraska ag director Ibach is the choice to lead Marketing and Regulatory Programs. There?s no word yet on when the full Senate will vote on the nominations. Continue reading Senate Ag Committee to vote on Northey, Ibach nominations at Brownfield Ag News.      
Professional Dairy Producers Milk Quality Workshop
Brownfield Anchor/Reporter Larry Lee will cover the Professional Dairy Producers Milk Quality Workshop in Onalaska, Wisconsin on November 1, 2017. Continue reading Professional Dairy Producers Milk Quality Workshop at Brownfield Ag News.      
Senators meet with EPA?s Pruitt
Four U.S. Senators in biofuels states?met with EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt Tuesday?urging him to keep strong Renewable Fuels Standard volumes in place. They are Senators Chuck Grassley and Joni? Ernst of Iowa, Deb Fischer of Nebraska and John Thune of South Dakota. Grassley says it?s Pruitt?s duty to follow congressional intent and he?ll be watching closely while holding the Administration accountable. Grassley also said President Trump promised him, twice, he would support the renewable fuels industry. Continue reading Senators meet with EPA’s Pruitt at Brownfield Ag News.      
Report: EPA instructed to back off on RFS changes
Bloomberg reports White House officials have directed the EPA to back off on proposals that would weaken the Renewable Fuels Standard. Citing ?people familiar with the decision?, Bloomberg says the EPA has been instructed to abandon two proposed changes: a reduction in biodiesel requirements and a proposal to allow export ethanol to count toward domestic quotas. Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds held a news conference Wednesday afternoon?to discuss phone conversations she had earlier in the day with both President Trump and EPA administrator Scott Pruitt. Continue reading Report: EPA instructed to back off on RFS changes at Brownfield Ag News.      
Summit draws questions about the 2018 farm bill
There are more questions than answers concerning the 2018 farm bill, but a room full of people listened to projections from policy experts Wednesday.? The coming months will reveal more about how U.S. farm policy will look, according to Pat Westhoff, director of the Food and Agriculture Policy Institute in Columbia, Missouri, but the 2018 Farm Bill Summit, put on by the University of Missouri, generated a lot of questions. The farm legislation for 2018 could look like the 2014 edition of the farm bill because producers, except for dairy and cotton producers, like what they have, and alternatives are hard to agree on, said Westhoff.? Continue reading Summit draws questions about the 2018 farm bill at Brownfield Ag News.      
Lean hog futures supported by higher cash business
At the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, live cattle took back most of yesterday?s losses in anticipation of strong export sales numbers tomorrow and spillover buying interest from today’s hog markets.? Feeder cattle were mostly lower on position squaring ahead of Friday?s Cattle on Feed report.??October live cattle closed $.30 higher at $111.47 and December live cattle closed $.67 higher at $116.65.? October feeder cattle closed $.37 higher at $152.52 and November feeder cattle closed $152.07. Continue reading Lean hog futures supported by higher cash business at Brownfield Ag News.      
Harvest pressure continues for corn, soybeans
Soybeans were fractionally lower on fund and technical selling after an up and down session. The trade?s expecting generally good harvest progress in many areas over the next few days, ahead of some new delays this weekend and early next week in parts of the Plains and Midwest. Demand should continue to limit losses or provide at least some support. The USDA?s weekly export sales report is out Thursday at 8:30 AM Eastern/7:30 Central Soybean meal was modestly higher and bean oil was modestly lower on the adjustment of product spreads. Continue reading Harvest pressure continues for corn, soybeans at Brownfield Ag News.      
Grassley angry with USDA over GIPSA rule
Republican Senator Chuck Grassley of Iowa agrees with the CEO of R-CALF USA about the Trump administration?s decision to withdraw the GIPSA rule. Grassley learned about the action Tuesday on his conference call with reporters, ?They?re just pandering to big corporations. They aren?t interested in the family farmers! And, the USDA is the U.S. Department of Agriculture, not the U.S. Department of big business, Big Agribusiness!? Grassley says the U.S. Department of Agriculture is supposed to help the family farmer. Continue reading Grassley angry with USDA over GIPSA rule at Brownfield Ag News.      
Tips for fall soil sampling
A nutrient management specialist has some tips for farmers taking soil samples this fall. Daniel Kaiser with the University of Minnesota says the first thing to focus on is testing at the right depths. “For mobile nutrients, six inches.? If you’re doing a nitrate sample, we’re typically going to be looking at about a two-foot depth.? So you want to make sure to do as good of a job as you can to try to get down to those depths to make sure the data is accurate and it can be comparable to what most of the recommendation systems are based on.” He tells Brownfield choosing the right sampling strategy also helps provide the most accurate picture of nutrient availability. Continue reading Tips for fall soil sampling at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
College Football Standout Shines In A Different "Field"
James Washington, a senior on the Oklahoma State University football team, was just named to the midseason All-American team.
A Farmer?s Story of Self-Driving
Whenever I see one of those news reports on television about the struggle to invent self-driving cars, I have the same thought: What?s the big deal? I?ve had self-driving tractors on my farm for years.
BASF Comments on $7 Billion Bayer Purchase
Less than a week after announcing a large buyout, BASF is revealing details of its plan to buy a large chunk of Bayer’s seed tech business. This transaction will launch BASF into the business of selling crop seed for the first time. 
U.S. Remains the Leading Crop Protection Market ? For Now
In nominal terms, the global market for crop protection chemicals further declined to $53.1 billion in harvest year 2016 as measured at the ex-company level and using average year exchange rates throughout. This represents the second year of decline in the global market. The rate of decline, however, has slowed with the big drop of some 9.8% in 2015 as compared to 2014 coming down to a more modest decline of some 2.6% in 2016 as compared to 2015. A recovery from this now low base of just over $53 billion should be more readily achieved. The question remains ? to what extent growth returned in 2017. As in the previous year, no region escaped the global pressures on the market, although in contrast to 2015 no region saw an overall drop in market value of greater than a few percentage points. In general the market was a lot ?flatter? with declines seen across the board as markets stabilized from the previous years? decline. There were, of course, a few notable exceptions of growth: Russia, Japan, India, and Argentina. The U.S. fell ?into the bucket? of small to moderate decline, broadly in line with the overall global market decline. Once again when measured at ex-company level and on a harvest-year basis, the U.S. market fell from just over $8 billion to just over $7.8 billion, or in other words, a decline of a fraction over 2%.Despite this decline, the U.S. retained for the second year running its position as the leading global crop protection market in terms of sales. A decline of some 4.8% in the Brazilian market (ex-company level and using average year exchange rates) meant that the gap between these two leading markets widened from under $100 million in 2015 to close to $300 million in 2016. Whilst the difference in value of some $300 million (about the size of the market in Uruguay) is not earth-shattering, it does indicate the different fortunes of the world?s largest two markets. Of course, the ?devil is in the details? (currency movement being once again the biggest devil here), and there are different ways to paint quite a different story. One such way is to look at the two markets in terms of area treated. If we compare the cumulative acres of product used on the ground, then Brazil continues to grow with in 2016 over 1.1 billion hectares (Super Developed Area) treated. The U.S. by comparison remained essentially the same in 2015 with a little over 500 million hectares treated; by those calculations, it was under half of that of Brazil. For now, however, Brazil continues to suffer from ongoing challenges including currency movement, credit availability, and pricing pressure, which dampen the intrinsically higher potential of this market. Compared to other sectors in the industry, a decline of 2% in the value of the U.S. crop protection market was extremely modest. Taking the latest USDA ERS estimates the U.S. net farm income ? a key indicator of U.S. farm well-being ? stood at $61.5 billion in 2016 as compared to $81.4 billion in 2015, a substantial decline of some 24%. Whilst not strictly comparable, in that the livestock sector fared the worst, it is an indication that the crop protection sector performed relatively well under such an environment. Although subject to revision the current ERS study puts the U.S. net farm income in 2017 at $63.4 billion in 2017, up 3% from 2016. The forecast rise in 2017, closely linked to commodity prices, comes after three consecutive years of decline from the 2013 record high of $123.8 billion, and could indicate the first ?green shoots? of an improving U.S. farm economy. The 2% decline in the U.S. market was not universally felt in the different product groups of herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides. Fungicides Fungicides, which had been the shining star in the U.S. market in 2015 (where the weather patterns favored the use of fungicides) shrunk such that the market was a little over $1.1 billion as compared to $1.2 billion in 2015. Despite the decline experienced in 2016 the sector is, however, poised for growth as co-formulations with the relatively new SDHIs continue to ?prove? themselves. Whilst fungicides remained the ?easy option? to cut from the spray program in 2016, even a small improvement in the commodity price situation favors the use of the higher value SDHIs in a market that remains dominated by single active ingredient-based products mainly based on triazoles or strobilurin chemistry. Herbicides Herbicides, by far the largest sector within the U.S. market, saw somewhat of a reversal of fortunes in 2016 as compared to 2015, growing all-be-it modestly some 1.5% to reach $4.6 billion.The dominant herbicide markets of maize and soybean both drove this market forward as growers increasingly moved to greater use of residuals and pre-emergence products. In soybeans, glyphosate-based products still dominate, but the soybean ?residual? pre-mixes based on sulfentrazone, chloransulam, and chlorimuron, to name but a few, are gaining a larger part of the cake. New technologies from 2017, with for example some 20 million acres of Xtend (dicamba-tolerant) soybeans already planted, are changing that dynamic once again somewhat. The subject of much debate, current ?teething? problems with dicamba drift one way or another will impact on the acceptance of that technology, the competitive Enlist (2,4-D) technology and on late pipeline developments such as those based on HPPD-inhibiting herbicides. Insecticides Insecticides also saw a decline in 2016 dropping some 6% to $1.8 billion. Here the decline was felt across virtually all crop groups with the exception of cotton, which improved largely on the back of increasing planted areas. In addition, the sector ? still dominated by older generic organophosphate and pyrethroid chemistries such as dicrotophos and bifenthrin ? is benefiting from formulations based on newer active substances including spiromesifen and flupyradifurone.
New Seed Company Enters the Market
New formed Local Seed Company says it will offer farmers a “direct-to-growers” option with a mission to provide custom crafted seed options delivered to the farm.
The Climate Corporation in Data Connectivity Agreement with AGCO
The Climate Corporation, a subsidiary of Monsanto Company, announced a data connectivity agreement with AGCO, providing farmers around the globe more options to connect their equipment to The Climate Corporation?s industry-leading Climate FieldView digital agriculture platform. ?The Climate FieldView platform continues to lead the industry with the broadest equipment connectivity across many different equipment types, makes and models so farmers can experience the value of powerful, data-driven digital tools to get the most from every acre.? said Mike Stern, chief executive officer for The Climate Corporation. ?Through this new agreement with AGCO, more farmers around the world will be able to seamlessly get all their data in one place and maximize the value of that data with the Climate FieldView platform?s advanced analytics-based insights to make management decisions for their operations with confidence.? The agreement will provide farmers three ways to connect to the Climate FieldView platform: Enables real-time data connectivity between the AGCO Connectivity Module (ACM), the company?s newest in-cab wireless technology, and farmers? Climate FieldView accounts. Expands compatibility across all lines of AGCO equipment for The Climate Corporation?s Climate FieldView TM Drive device, which streams field data directly into the Climate FieldView platform to help farmers harness their data to uncover valuable insights, optimize yield and maximize profit. Continues to enable Climate FieldView data connectivity with Precision Planting?s 20/20 monitors. This agreement also paves the way for cloud-to-cloud data transfer that would give farmers the ability to easily send data, such as a seeding prescription, from their Climate FieldView account to AGCO for execution on AGCO equipment. As The Climate Corporation continues to expand its data connectivity to help more farmers access advanced agronomic insights, additional new data layers will feed the company?s robust R&D engine, ultimately enabling the development of valuable new features for farmers in the Climate FieldView platform. In August 2017, the company announced the acceleration of R&D advancements through the company?s robust innovation pipeline, along with new product features and enhancements to help farmers manage their field variability more precisely than ever before. Launched in 2015, The Climate Corporation?s Climate FieldView platform is on more than 120 million acres with more than 100,000 users across the United States, Canada and Brazil, and has quickly become the most broadly connected platform in the industry. The platform is continuing to expand into new global regions, and the company plans to bring the Climate FieldView platform to Europe in the near term, in addition to Argentina, South Africa and Australia over the next few years.
RMI Reveals Greatest Banking Threat is Farm Foreclosures
The Rural Mainstreet Index (RMI) released each month by Creighton University is becoming a broken record when describing the farm economy - the overall index remaining below growth neutral. The bright spot in the September RMI is the index saw slight improvements, jumping from 39.6 in September to 45.3 in October.  Every state showed a boost in the RMI, except Missouri, where the index slipped to 49.2 from 51.3
Winter Outlook Calls for Above-Normal Temps for Much of Country
Below-normal winter precip is expected in Oklahoma and Texas.
Morning Grain Commentary from Blue Line Futures
The grain markets continue to look for new news for their next directional move. Is there anything on the horizon that could prompt that?
6 Leadership Tactics to Employ
Tips to inspire, motivate and engage your team
Live cattle pares early losses and hog futures come up, but feeder cat
Live cattle pares early losses and hog futures come up, but feeder cattle ends mostly weaker.
Grain Market Rundown (Video) and Livestock Roundup
Oliver Sloup breaks down the technicals he is watching in the gran markets as we head towards the back half of the week in a short video. The Livestock Roundup gives a recap of today's cattle and hog trade.
What Robots Have Taught Us
Considering installing a robotic milking system on your dairy? You won’t want to miss the robotics panel at the 2017 MILK Business Conference.
Studies on corn particle size show different results.
Studies on corn particle size show different results.
Clemson researchers are teaming with area farmers to learn how to grow
Clemson researchers are teaming with area farmers to learn how to grow alfalfa with bermudagrass to increase forage quality.