CORN  
Delivery Date Cash Price Basis Futures Change Futures Price
History Apr18 3.50 04/25/2018 9:17:00 AM CST -0.35
 3'2
384'4
History May18 3.52 04/25/2018 9:17:00 AM CST -0.33
 3'2
384'4
History Jun18 3.55 04/25/2018 9:17:00 AM CST -0.39
 3'6
393'6
History Jul18 3.57 04/25/2018 9:17:00 AM CST -0.37
 3'6
393'6
History Aug18 3.62 04/25/2018 9:16:00 AM CST -0.39
 3'4
400'6
History Sep18 3.64 04/25/2018 9:16:00 AM CST -0.37
 3'4
400'6
History Oct18 3.70 04/25/2018 9:17:00 AM CST -0.40
 3'2
409'6
History Nov18 3.70 04/25/2018 9:17:00 AM CST -0.40
 3'2
409'6
History Dec18 3.74 04/25/2018 9:17:00 AM CST -0.36
 3'2
409'6
History Jan19 3.76 04/25/2018 9:16:00 AM CST -0.42
 3'4
417'6
History Feb19 3.78 04/25/2018 9:16:00 AM CST -0.40
 3'4
417'6
History Mar19 3.80 04/25/2018 9:16:00 AM CST -0.38
 3'4
417'6
 
SOYBEANS  
Delivery Date Cash Price Basis Futures Change Futures Price
History Apr18 9.51 04/25/2018 9:17:00 AM CST -0.79
 7'2
1029'4
History May18 9.53 04/25/2018 9:17:00 AM CST -0.77
 7'2
1029'4
History Jun18 9.56 04/25/2018 9:17:00 AM CST -0.85
 7'2
1041'2
History Jul18 9.58 04/25/2018 9:17:00 AM CST -0.83
 7'2
1041'2
History Aug18 9.51 04/25/2018 9:17:00 AM CST -0.85
 6'6
1035'4
History Oct18 9.51 04/25/2018 9:17:00 AM CST -0.85
 6'6
1035'4
Local
Corn Fostering Bt-Resistant Worms' Move To Cotton
Extension entomologists say some of the older commercially available Bt cotton varieties remain important tools in pest management strategies, but with identified bollworm resistance, growers should be prepared to take additional control measures. The problem begins in corn where the same Bt technology used in cotton allows worms to build resistance before they move into cotton fields. LSU Extension entomologist Dr. Sebe Brown, speaking at the February Louisiana Technology and Management Conference in Marksville, La., explained: “We’re seeing a reduction in susceptibility of bollworm to older Bt technology. Bollworm resistance is selected in corn before moths come into cotton. Bollworms are being exposed in corn, and bringing whatever reductions in susceptibility or resistance they develop. That sets us up for failure.” He says most bollworms migrate out of corn. “A few may be moving in from soybeans or grain sorghum, but most come from corn.” It’s not just a Louisiana problem, Brown says. “Entomologists across the Cotton Belt believe the Cry1 has been exhausted, and Cry2 is up in the air. We fear that we are going to lose it. An 8 percent damage level in Bollgard II cotton is alarming. “Resistance to Cry 1 and Cry 2 is becoming more widespread. We are seeing a lot of variability with Cry 2 resistance from high resistance to not as much. Cry2 resistance may be field-to-field,” Brown says. He adds that Mid-South and Texas entomologists also report resistance. Bollgard II technology may still be worth the price of technology fees. “It still provides excellent control of tobacco budworm, but farmers may have to make insecticide sprays for bollworm,” Brown says. Those applications may depend on the level of bollworm infestation. High populations, Brown says, are more likely to need an insecticide. Lower populations may not. He recommends growers give the Bt technology, especially the third generation or VIP cotton, a chance to work, “but be timely with applications if control breaks down.” Mitigation plan Cotton producers need a mitigation plan to manage the Bollgard II, WideStrike and TwinLink varieties, Brown warns. “Opt for the most robust technology possible,” he advises. That should include newer technology — Bollgard 3, WideStrike 3, or TwinLink Plus, along with aggressive scouting. If worms break through, especially in weaker technologies — Bollgard II, WideStrike or TwinLink — make an application as quickly possible with the proper rate and gallonage of Prevathon or Besiege. “Target small larvae; they are harder to control once they get into the canopy. Spraying based on egg lay may not be applicable in certain situations,” he says. “Also, we have no evidence of efficacy for spraying adult moths migrating into cotton fields, and those applications may flare other pests.” Brown says producers should consider 6 percent damage with live worms present a threshold for spray application. “If producers make it to 6 percent, that’s an indication to spray; however, if a large egg lay has occurred in weaker or second generation Bt technologies, an egg spray with Prevathon or Besiege may be justified. Brown says technology available to cotton producers for the past two years offers promise. “VIP technology is a better package than Bollgard II, WideStrike or TwinLink,” he says. “This is not new technology; VIP has been used in corn for nine years, but it has just recently been available in commercial cotton varieties. It offers much better control.” He’s seen very few worm breakthroughs in VIP technology in cotton. “It is still effective; worms are susceptible to it.” He adds a note of caution that VIP technology has been available in corn for nine years and bollworm selection on VIP corn is occurring. “None of the technology is bulletproof,” Brown said. “Producers should scout for worms and be ready to apply insecticide." Source: Delta FarmPress
National
Feeding dairy cattle while milk prices remain low
  A professor emeritus at the University of Illinois has some advice for dairy farmers trying to stay profitable during this tight margin environment. Mike Hutjens points to some measurement tools that look at the quality of forages at harvest, during fermentation, and even manure samples, in an effort to increase efficiency.     Continue reading Feeding dairy cattle while milk prices remain low at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
ADAMA to Launch Soybean Fungicide in Brazil
Global crop protection company ADAMA has announced that is ready to launch its distinctive fungicide, CRONNOS, in Brazil, the world?s largest soybean market. A final regulatory approval from the Agricultural Ministry is expected in the coming days. CRONNOS is a unique three-way mixture fungicide for soybean rust, including a multisite protectant. Its liquid formulation, CRONNOS …
Facebook
Yesterday afternoon the USDA reported that the nation's corn crop is ...
Yesterday afternoon the USDA reported that the nation's corn crop is 5% planted. We were 15% last year, and the 5-year average is 14%. Soybeans are 2% complete, right on pace with the 5-year average. Chicago locals are looking at a 5-day temperature forecast of cooler temps across most of the corn belt, but warms up nicely after that. This morning, the USDA reported that another round of US beans were sold to Argentina -- 60,000mt of old crop and 70,000mt of new crop. Managed money funds are estimated to be short 53k contracts of wheat, long 135k contracts of corn, and long 159k contracts of soybeans. On the open at 8:30 a.m., corn and beans are trading a penny lower, KC Wheat down 5.>
Getting after it early this morning! #plant18
Getting after it early this morning! #plant18>
Summer row crop futures are higher this morning to start the week. ...
Summer row crop futures are higher this morning to start the week. Weekend rainfall came in as expected for the Hard-Red Winter Wheat belt. Planters are rolling across the Eastern Corn Belt and planting should gain some momentum this week. Friday's Cattle on Feed report as of April 1st, showed Cattle on Feed at 107.4% vs last year. March placements came in at 90.7% and marketing?s at 96.1%. The USDA will report crop progress this afternoon and the market is expecting to 4-6% planted compared to our 13% average. On the open at 8:30 a.m., May corn +1 at 3.77-1/2, May Beans +1-3/4 at 10.30-1/2, May KC Wheat +4-1/2 at 4.87-1/4.>
We had a fun afternoon celebrating Verda today! We hope she enjoys ...
We had a fun afternoon celebrating Verda today! We hope she enjoys retirement but she will also be extremely missed here!>
Improving US weather has futures trading lower this morning. ...
Improving US weather has futures trading lower this morning. Forecasters are confident the southern plains will see some moisture this weekend. The northern plains is looking at the next two weeks of normal temps. World trade is on edge this morning as US milo that was on course to China has been rerouted since China's tax announcement on Tuesday. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Dec. corn down 2 at 4.06, Nov. beans down 5-1/2 at 10.37, July KC Wheat down 8 at 5.07.>
JOB OPPORTUNITY! Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for a ...
JOB OPPORTUNITY! Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for a full-time with benefits Marketing/Communications Specialist. This position will coordinate marketing strategies and plans on both regional and local levels. For more info and to apply click the link below!>
Congratulations to Aurora High School's FFA advisor Dana Anderson on ...
Congratulations to Aurora High School's FFA advisor Dana Anderson on receiving this high honor. Much deserved! #ACTougherTogether>
#chooseE15 #yourcornyourethanol
#chooseE15 #yourcornyourethanol>
We are hanging out at the State FFA Convention today! Come see us! We ...
We are hanging out at the State FFA Convention today! Come see us! We are having a drawing for some awesome t-shirts! #ACtoughertogether
EXCITING NEWS! We broke ground today for a new A-Stop 24 in Grant, ...
EXCITING NEWS! We broke ground today for a new A-Stop 24 in Grant, Nebraska! We will be able to offer multiple blends here with our blender pumps, including E15! #yourcornyourethanol #chooseE15>
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JOB OPPORTUNITY Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for ...
JOB OPPORTUNITY Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for full-time Blend Plant Operator with benefits at the Bertrand location. CDL and Hazmat preferred and able to lift 50 lbs. Contact Rocky Sander at 308-472-3283, apply online at the link below, or send application/resume to PO Box 401, Bertrand, NE 68927. Aurora Cooperative is an Equal Opportunity Employer.>
Don't forget to fill out and send in your scholarship application! ...
Don't forget to fill out and send in your scholarship application! Deadline is Monday, March 26th! Complete your application online at the link below or send it by mail. If your mailing it in, be sure it's postmarked by Monday!>
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Local
Corn Fostering Bt-Resistant Worms' Move To Cotton
Extension entomologists say some of the older commercially available Bt cotton varieties remain important tools in pest management strategies, but with identified bollworm resistance, growers should be prepared to take additional control measures. The problem begins in corn where the same Bt technology used in cotton allows worms to build resistance before they move into cotton fields. LSU Extension entomologist Dr. Sebe Brown, speaking at the February Louisiana Technology and Management Conference in Marksville, La., explained: “We’re seeing a reduction in susceptibility of bollworm to older Bt technology. Bollworm resistance is selected in corn before moths come into cotton. Bollworms are being exposed in corn, and bringing whatever reductions in susceptibility or resistance they develop. That sets us up for failure.” He says most bollworms migrate out of corn. “A few may be moving in from soybeans or grain sorghum, but most come from corn.” It’s not just a Louisiana problem, Brown says. “Entomologists across the Cotton Belt believe the Cry1 has been exhausted, and Cry2 is up in the air. We fear that we are going to lose it. An 8 percent damage level in Bollgard II cotton is alarming. “Resistance to Cry 1 and Cry 2 is becoming more widespread. We are seeing a lot of variability with Cry 2 resistance from high resistance to not as much. Cry2 resistance may be field-to-field,” Brown says. He adds that Mid-South and Texas entomologists also report resistance. Bollgard II technology may still be worth the price of technology fees. “It still provides excellent control of tobacco budworm, but farmers may have to make insecticide sprays for bollworm,” Brown says. Those applications may depend on the level of bollworm infestation. High populations, Brown says, are more likely to need an insecticide. Lower populations may not. He recommends growers give the Bt technology, especially the third generation or VIP cotton, a chance to work, “but be timely with applications if control breaks down.” Mitigation plan Cotton producers need a mitigation plan to manage the Bollgard II, WideStrike and TwinLink varieties, Brown warns. “Opt for the most robust technology possible,” he advises. That should include newer technology — Bollgard 3, WideStrike 3, or TwinLink Plus, along with aggressive scouting. If worms break through, especially in weaker technologies — Bollgard II, WideStrike or TwinLink — make an application as quickly possible with the proper rate and gallonage of Prevathon or Besiege. “Target small larvae; they are harder to control once they get into the canopy. Spraying based on egg lay may not be applicable in certain situations,” he says. “Also, we have no evidence of efficacy for spraying adult moths migrating into cotton fields, and those applications may flare other pests.” Brown says producers should consider 6 percent damage with live worms present a threshold for spray application. “If producers make it to 6 percent, that’s an indication to spray; however, if a large egg lay has occurred in weaker or second generation Bt technologies, an egg spray with Prevathon or Besiege may be justified. Brown says technology available to cotton producers for the past two years offers promise. “VIP technology is a better package than Bollgard II, WideStrike or TwinLink,” he says. “This is not new technology; VIP has been used in corn for nine years, but it has just recently been available in commercial cotton varieties. It offers much better control.” He’s seen very few worm breakthroughs in VIP technology in cotton. “It is still effective; worms are susceptible to it.” He adds a note of caution that VIP technology has been available in corn for nine years and bollworm selection on VIP corn is occurring. “None of the technology is bulletproof,” Brown said. “Producers should scout for worms and be ready to apply insecticide." Source: Delta FarmPress
Legal Action Gives Some Arkansas Farmers Access to Dicamba
Arkansas' in-season ban on dicamba does not apply to a group of nearly 200 farmers who have obtained temporary restraining orders on the ban from state judges. Three judges in Clay, Mississippi and Phillips counties have filed temporary restraining orders (TROs) of the ban in the past week, in response to last-minute complaints filed by nearly 200 farmers. In Greene County, a judge will hold a hearing on Friday on the status of an additional restraining order for 13 farmers. Clay, Mississippi and Greene counties are in extreme northeast Arkansas; Phillips is in the east central portion of the state. All are key soybean producing counties. The office of Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge is in the process of appealing those decisions to the state Supreme Court, Nicole Ryan, communications director for the attorney general, told DTN. But for now, nearly 200 farmers can legally spray dicamba under the temporary restraining orders, Ryan confirmed. "The (Arkansas State) Plant Board will enforce the federal label requirements for the group spraying dicamba, while the Mississippi and Phillips county TROs are in place," she said. The attorney general will be seeking "expedited stays," from the Supreme Court, which would halt the judges' rulings until the appeals are decided, she added. In addition to BASF's Engenia herbicide, Monsanto's XtendiMax herbicide is currently registered in Arkansas for use on Xtend soybeans and cotton. However, Monsanto has opted not to sell it there for the time being, Monsanto spokesperson Kyel Richards said in an email to DTN. "Our goal is to make XtendiMax with VaporGrip Technology available to growers in Arkansas who truly need this weed-control tool, but we need a stable and predictable political environment before we are able to do that," he said in the email. The Arkansas State Plant Board decided to ban dicamba use on Xtend crops from April 16 through Oct. 31 after receiving 997 complaints of dicamba injury to soybeans and other crops and plants in 2017. Whether the farmers with restraining orders will actually apply dicamba is uncertain, given that the state's appeal process could halt their access to it in a matter of weeks. Moreover, planting is still underway in Arkansas, with only 10% of soybeans planted as of Monday, according to USDA Crop Progress reports. Here's a summary of the current state of the many legal cases brought by farmers against the Arkansas State Plant Board regarding dicamba use: THE MISSISSIPPI, PHILLIPS, CLAY AND GREENE COUNTY CASES Eighty-five farmers filed a last-minute complaint against the plant board on April 12 in Mississippi County, Arkansas, demanding that the dicamba ban be voided immediately. Their lawyer, David Burnett, argued that the plant board itself was an unconstitutional entity that does not deserve legislative capabilities, because it contains unelected members appointed by private individuals. Just one day later, Second Judicial Circuit Court Judge Tonya Alexander viewed the complaint and issued a temporary restraining order of the ban, stating that, "the Plaintiffs face the immediate, irreparable harm to their crops." The same process played out for the farmer complaints filed in Phillips and Clay counties. The Phillips County case involved 70 farmers and resulted in a temporary restraining order from First Judicial Circuit Judge Christopher Morledge. The Clay County case involved 38 farmers and resulted in a temporary restraining order from Second Judicial Circuit Judge Randy Philhours. In Greene County, 13 farmers brought a similar complaint against the plant board, and a hearing on their request for a restraining order will be held Friday, April 20, Ryan said. The Arkansas Attorney General's office is racing to address this wave of last-minute legal action. In addition to appealing the cases to the state Supreme Court, the attorney general has issued motions to dissolve the Phillips and Mississippi County restraining orders, arguing that no immediate damage is posed to the farmers' crops. "The Plant Board rule was approved by both the Governor and the General Assembly and, as such, Attorney General Rutledge has a duty to defend against the challenges that have been brought against it," Ryan said. "THE ARKANSAS 6" Last week, the state's Supreme Court ruled that the six Arkansas farmers who filed a lawsuit against the Arkansas State Plant Board will not have access to dicamba for now. Previously, Judge Tim Fox had dismissed the farmers' lawsuit on March 30 based on an earlier Supreme Court ruling that state agencies like the Plant Board have sovereign immunity -- that, is they can't be sued. But Fox also ruled that, because the dismissal violated their due process rights, the ban did not apply to these six farmers. The state immediately appealed that ruling to the state Supreme Court, which granted a stay of the judge's order. That means the farmers will not be able to use dicamba on Xtend crops until the appeal is decided, which can take up to eight months. "The Arkansas Supreme Court's stay of Judge Fox's ruling means that the Court believes the Plant Board is likely to win on appeal, which is another reason why the other two circuit courts need to vacate their temporary restraining orders," Ryan told DTN. The farmers and their attorney, Grant Ballard, have indicated that they will continue to file appeals. Source: DTN / The Progressive Farmer
China Imposes Import Fee on U.S. Sorghum
China’s Ministry of Commerce has imposed a “temporary antidumping measure” on U.S. sorghum imports, requiring a deposit of almost 179 percent on the value of sorghum shipments starting today. National Sorghum Producers president and CEO Tim Lust says they are “deeply disappointed” in the action. “National Sorghum Producers, alongside our producers, stakeholders and partners, has cooperated fully with China’s antidumping and countervailing duty investigations, including submitting several thousand pages of data demonstrating conclusively that U.S. sorghum is neither dumped nor causing any injury to China. None of this information appears to have been seriously considered or used in today’s preliminary determination, which is neither fair nor appropriate,” said Lust. “We continue to greatly value our Chinese customers and what has been a win-win business relationship between U.S. sorghum producers and our Chinese partners. Today’s decision in China reflects a broader trade fight in which U.S. sorghum farmers are the victim, not the cause. And U.S. sorghum farmers should not be paying the price for this larger fight.” Tony St. James, All Ag News, interviewed Lust about the action. Listen here. Source: AgWired
Sunflower Prices Hold Firm For Another Week
USDA’s April US/World supply and demand report was termed a nonevent by most of the trade. USDA lowered the Argentine soybean crop and raised Brazil soybean crop production as expected. They also lowered U.S. soybean carryout by only 5 million bushels, raised U.S. soymeal exports and increased U.S. soyoil ending stocks. Old and new crop sunflower prices have been relatively firm with little movement in the past week. New crop prices remain $1.65 to $2.65 per hundredweight higher than last year. There is still time to take advantage of the market opportunities that sunflowers can offer as crushing plants are still offering Act of God and cash new crop contracts. Sunflower is one of the only oilseeds that pay premiums for oil content above 40 percent. Considering oil premiums that are offered at the crush plants on oil content above 40 percent at a rate of 2 percent price premium for each 1 percent of oil above 40 percent; this pushes a $18.70 contract with 45 percent oil content gross return 10 percent higher per hundredweight and would raise the cash price to over $20.50. An AOG contract at $18.10 per hundredweight to almost $20.00. Trading for the next few weeks will mainly revolve around the USDA reports, competition for 2018 acreage, export sales, plus news of any potential tariffs levied by China and impact it might have on U.S. exports. Source: High Plains Journal
5 Pieces of Advice to Consider Before Corn Planting Begins
Yup, spring has sprung. And your farm-bred instinct is telling you to let your corn planter roll. First, though, check these precautions raised by University of Delaware Extension specialists: • Soils warm enough? Corn germination begins once soil temperature at the 2- to 3-inch depth reaches 50 degrees F. As of last Friday, maximum daily soil temperatures at Georgetown, Del., were nearing that mark. But soil temperatures were still dipping into the mid-40s at night. Waiting for soil temperatures to warm just a bit more will be important for achieving uniform stands needed to maximize yield. After last weekend’s near 80-degree “hot spell,” at least some fields may be ready to plant. Soil temperature should be taken with a soil thermometer in several areas of the field, especially those with variable soil types. Fields with better drainage, sandier soil texture or higher organic matter, as well as fields that were tilled or that will be tilled, are better choices for earlier planting. • Beware of other field factors. Fields that receive tillage, conventional or conservation, tend to warm faster than no-till. Residues also can act as a mulching (insulating) layer, limiting soil temperature variability and delaying effects of warmer air temperatures. Checking soil moisture content is a good predictor of soil temperature. More moist soils take longer to warm up. • Variable emergence is costly. If it takes more than two weeks for corn to emerge, you risk more variability in the seedling growth stage. When seedlings differ by two or more leaf stages (two fully emerged leaf plant versus a four fully emerged leaf plant), the smaller plants can act more like a weed than a contributor to field yield potential. Plus, with poor or uneven stands, there’ll be a more open canopy. That’s an open invite for weed emergence and increased weed competition. • Consider tillage impact. You can also encourage soil warming by using row cleaners or strip tillage to allow direct sunlight on the soil surface and help warm the seed row. Deeper planting will expose seed to cooler temperatures compared to those planted at shallower depths. But planting at depths of less than 1.5 inches isn’t recommended. • About starter. Use of starter fertilizers (at a rate that’ll sustain the crop until sidedressing) can also promote more rapid growth and even germination. The Delaware Extension agronomists recommend using fertilizers with a lower salt index on sandy soils and avoiding placement of fertilizers in-furrow (pop-ups) to limit salt damage potential to seed or young seedling. High salt concentrations can damage and/or dry out emerging roots, leading to uneven emergence. You already know what that can do to yields. Source: American Agriculturist
Tougher Together: Aurora & You
Yesterday afternoon the USDA reported that the nation's corn crop is ...
Yesterday afternoon the USDA reported that the nation's corn crop is 5% planted. We were 15% last year, and the 5-year average is 14%. Soybeans are 2% complete, right on pace with the 5-year average. Chicago locals are looking at a 5-day temperature forecast of cooler temps across most of the corn belt, but warms up nicely after that. This morning, the USDA reported that another round of US beans were sold to Argentina -- 60,000mt of old crop and 70,000mt of new crop. Managed money funds are estimated to be short 53k contracts of wheat, long 135k contracts of corn, and long 159k contracts of soybeans. On the open at 8:30 a.m., corn and beans are trading a penny lower, KC Wheat down 5.>
Getting after it early this morning! #plant18
Getting after it early this morning! #plant18>
What Does The Farm Bill Cost?
Last week the House Agriculture Committee released their version of the 2018 Farm Bill (HR2). What do you think it costs? According to estimates from the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), total farm bill spending for all titles from 2018 to 2028 would be $867 billion. The CBO analysis shows HR2 would increase mandatory spending on programs by $500 million over 10 years and would result in $7 million in deficit savings for the same period. However, overall mandatory spending would increase by $3.2 billion between fiscal years 2019-2023, the life of the legislation, Pro Farmer’s Jim Wiesemeyer points out. "Costs would drop sharply over the next five years by $2.7 billion,” he says. What are some money savers in the bill? Conservation. According to Wiesemeyer, the bill would eliminate the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) to save $12.6 billion over 10 years, of which $7.7 billion would go toward expanding the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). “While most of the rest of the CSP savings would be kept in the conservation title for other programs, $795 million would be moved into other sections of the bill,” he says. “The phase-out of CSP would save $12.6 billion over a decade, while spending in EQIP would rise to nearly $7.7 billion.” Infrastructure. Spending on rural infrastructure and economic development would decline by $517 million, Wiesemeyer says. Crop insurance. According to Wiesemeyer, crop insurance funding slides by $161 million under HR2. What are the spending increases? Horticulture. Funding would increase by $10 million. Farm Programs. Spending on farm programs would increase by $193 million. Extension. Extension programs gain $250 million under the bill. Trade. The house bill boosts trade promotion programs by $450 million. SNAP. Funding for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program increases by $436 million under HR2. However, Wiesemeyer says it actually saves money in the long run. “Tightened eligibility rules for SNAP helped garner $1.2 billion to match supermarket incentives for SNAP recipients to buy fruits, vegetables and dairy products,” he says. For nutrition: $463 million in direct spending is offset by $465 million in revenue. Net impact: the nutrition Title 4 saves $2 million over 10 years.” Miscellaneous. A variety of programs benefit from a $566 million funding increase. When the rubber meets the road, Wiesemeyer says the House farm bill is budget neutral, including for nutrition. In fact, overall, the farm bill proposals save $7 million over 10 years. Source: AgWeb
Dry, Warmer Weather Through Next Week May Allow Planting to Begin
The system that dumped several inches of snow has finally moved out of the central and northern Midwest, but whether the weather will hold long enough for growers to get planters running is at the fore of farmers’ minds. Joel Widenor, a meteorologist at Commodity Weather Group in Washington, told Agriculture.com that a warmup is indeed on the way, and it should remain dry enough to allow the ground to dry sufficiently to give many producers at least a shot of getting into the fields late next week. “For the Northern Plains, we’re going to see a couple of warmer days over the weekend, and that’s going to get rid of a lot of snow cover,” he said. “If anything does manage to hang on, it’ll be gone by the middle of next week.” Temperatures in the central Midwest also will be warmer next week, which should get rid of most of the snow in the region. Areas that received snow this week – mostly along the border between Iowa and Minnesota – likely will see most of it melting off, as sustained warmer temperatures are forecast, Widenor said. More than a foot of snow reportedly fell in Lime Creek, Iowa, yesterday, and in many parts of the state more than 18 inches have fallen this month. Still, growers have time before they have to be overly concerned about their planting window closing, said Virgil Schmitt, a field agronomist at Iowa State University’s Extension office in Muscatine. “From a corn-planting standpoint, they’ll want to have that done by the fifth to the eighth of May, so we still have a lot of time to get it done,” he said. “It sounds like the weather is going to warm up considerably next week. So if we don’t get a whole lot of rain, we’re going to be seeing people out in the fields pretty heavy.” If producers start planting next Thursday or Friday, that still gives them about 10 days of planting, which is more than enough for most farmers to get seeds into the ground. With modern technology, Schmitt said, many growers can get their entire farms planted in two or three days given good conditions. “From a statewide standpoint, on a good day we can get more than 10% of our corn planted – in one day,” he said. “We can get a lot done in a hurry, so I don’t think people are that concerned yet. If we go 10 days and still haven’t turned a wheel, then I’ll be nervous.” Most growers in Iowa aren’t yet considering switching acres from corn to soybeans, though soybeans seem like the more popular choice this year based on calculated returns. The USDA said at the end of March that producers would plant 88 million acres with corn and 89 million acres with soybeans. That marks the first time in history planting intentions for beans were higher than for corn, but it makes sense from a purely economic standpoint, Schmitt said. “You don’t have to put nitrogen fertilizer on soybeans and seed costs are a little bit lower,” the agronomist said. “So with that, a lot of people are thinking about the beans a little bit, because profit margins are going to be awful thin – if they exist at all. Once way to improve profits is lessening the input costs.” Commodity Weather Group’s Widenor said he sees temperatures in the Midwest warming into the 60s and 70s by the middle of next week. Chicago will be in the 60s on its warmest days, St. Louis will be in the 70s, and Minneapolis will probably get into the low 60s, he said. As for rain, he expects it to mostly hold off through at least next week. The Dakotas and parts of western Minnesota are forecast to get some precipitation, but not for another 10 to 14 days, he said. Totals in areas where rain falls will be scant – likely under a half inch. “It’s not going to be a huge amount,” Widenor said. “After that, it’s going to be fairly quiet for the balance of the 15-day period in northern areas.” A cooler trend is forecast toward the end of the 11- to 15-day outlook and the 16- to 30-day projection is trending wetter, but confidence isn’t huge in those weather models because they’re so far out, he said. “It’s going to be driest from the middle of next week through late in the 11- to 15-day” outlook, he said. “After that, it may go back in the cooler and wetter direction.” Source: Successful Farming
Grab the Basis on Corn, Soybeans
If you have corn or soybeans stored unpriced this spring, here’s a marketing opportunity to consider. It’s especially helpful for bushels stored in on-farm bins, especially if those bushels aren’t going to be dry enough to safely store into summer or fall. Using this marketing strategy on at least a portion of those bushels, you can lock in the basis and still stay long in the futures market. You simply deliver the grain when basis is attractive. Then re-own those bushels you delivered by using these tools: a basis contract (re-owning via July futures) or a minimum price contract (re-owning via July call options). Basis is the difference between the local cash price and the nearby futures price. With the selloff in futures prices due to the threats of Chinese tariffs, the processor and river basis bids narrowed (strengthened), as local demand remains strong for both corn and soybeans. Spring offers best pricing Some of the best basis opportunities of the year often occur during April and May. Farmers get busy with spring fieldwork and planting and are reluctant to deliver large quantities of bushels. Likewise, co-ops and other country elevators are busy in spring and have less time and manpower available to move stored grain to processors. Once we move past Memorial Day weekend, however, you can expect renewed interest in hauling grain by both farmers and co-ops. Farmers should not lose sight of the large U.S. ending stocks of corn and soybeans forecast for the end of the crop marketing year in August. A return to more normal planting conditions this spring could impact basis for both old- and new-crop bushels. This chart reflects USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service data for percent of U.S. corn and soybeans marketed by month for the past 21 years. Note the November-December period when farmers typically lock their grain bin doors. An even better basis tends to occur in April through May, as farmers head to the fields and co-ops are busy delivering seed, fertilizer, etc. Check the basis offered by major processors in your area. Most have better cash bids for last half of April through May versus the June-July time frame. These six weeks could prove to be a good time to move the grain to market, especially corn that you know won’t be dry or cool enough to be stored safely into July and August. Executing the strategy Tell your grain merchandisers you have corn you’d like to deliver as you notice the basis they are offering is attractive. Ask them if you could deliver your corn on a basis contract or perhaps a minimum-price contract. Upon delivery of your grain, the merchandiser will then buy a July futures contract or buy a July call option on your behalf. Farmers will be very busy the next few weeks getting crops in the ground. Co-ops are also busy in spring and aren’t likely to be delivering as much grain to processors. Thus, this April-May time frame could provide some of the better basis opportunity of the year, especially on days when market prices move sharply downward. Keep in mind processors, such as ethanol plants and soybean crushers, need grain every weekday; nickels and dimes are sitting there with the processor basis because they are always buying grain. Once you put those delivered bushels on basis or minimum price contracts, you will still need to have a price objective and a time objective. Remember, minimum price using the call options for July will expire on July 22. So, by using this strategy, you can buy yourself a couple months’ time. For bushels placed on basis contracts, they will require a decision to sell those July futures positions by the first notice day of the July contract, or about June 29. Avoiding risks Staying long the July futures allows for participating in a July futures price rally, as well as the risk of lower futures prices. Since you have already delivered the cash bushels, you aren’t risking both basis and futures prices simultaneously. This marketing strategy takes some of the price risk off the table. It can also prove useful for bushels in commercial storage. However, don’t expect as attractive of basis opportunities as are offered by processor bids. In addition, you’ve already accumulated approximately six months of commercial storage costs. Consider moving these commercially stored bushels earlier in the marketing year to avoid accruing fixed costs of storage and possibly interest. As you plan your marketing strategy, keep in mind that with ending stocks of 2.1 billion bushels for corn and 570 million bushels of beans projected, the U.S. will have a large quantity of bushels left over on Aug. 31. Many of these bushels will still be moving in September, as odds of an early harvest have been minimized with the later-than-normal corn planting. Source: Wallaces Farmer
Raising Record Breakers
Illinois farmers have been busy over the last few years, breaking production records and crushing average yields. “Farmers are increasing yields while cutting back on inputs to survive,” says Stephanie Porter, Burrus Seed sales agronomist, adding that farmers scrutinize every input decision, including traits, nutrients and seeding rates. As farmers gear up for the 2018 season, what’s the secret to another successful year? In Warren County, where the highest average corn yield in the nation in 2017 was harvested, Porter says farmers planted in optimum conditions, managed nutrients and used variable seeding rates to improve stands and minimize costs. Over the past 10 years, farmers have become more efficient with nitrogen applications by cutting rates, changing timing or using precision technology to pinpoint variable rates. “We’re getting better at taking that mountain of data and learning to apply it,” says Matt Montgomery, DuPont Pioneer field agronomist. Add solid management decisions to fertile soils, timely rains, minimal pest pressure and cool nights during pollination and grain fill, and you have the successful 2017 season. In Sangamon County, Montgomery credits early planting, cool temperatures and minimal stress during pod fill for the highest average soybean yields in 2017. “We have to be gentle on beans during pod fill, and we need adequate moisture,” Montgomery says. “We had that.” What it means for 2018 As soil temperatures linger below normal and the forecast remains bleak at best — with snow falling on Easter for much of the state — will farmers miss the early-planting window? For most of Illinois, Montgomery says soybeans planted before the third week in May historically have a yield advantage. On average, half the corn crop is planted before May 1. But don’t let the calendar drive your decisions, Porter says. Focus instead on the long-term forecast and proper soil conditions. “We put a lot of emphasis on soil temperatures,” Porter notes. “We should put more emphasis on planting into a warming trend and making sure the soil is fit.” In 2017, corn planted in optimum soil conditions in May outyielded corn planted right before heavy rain in April. “Don’t mud it in or plant right before a big downpour,” Porter says. “You won’t get that stand, and you’ll give up some yield.” Source: Prairie Farmer
Changes to RFS Could Result In Demand Destruction
  Based on his own back-of-the-envelope calculations, Minnesota farmer Kirby Hettver could lose tens of thousands of dollars of earnings because of President Donald Trump. But damaging as the brewing trade war with China may turn out to be for Hettver and other American soybean farmers, he says the greater financial impact could come if Trump moves ahead with changes to the U.S. ethanol mandate, known as the Renewable Fuel Standard, or RFS. While proposed tariffs announced by China last week would apply to about $14 billion a year of U.S. soybean exports, the RFS accounts for 38% of the U.S. corn crop, valued at about $21 billion at current prices. And unlike the situation in the soybean market, where other buyers could pick up the slack for a drop in Chinese demand, the undoing of U.S. biofuel laws could lead to real demand destruction. Farmers “thought they were voting for an administration that was supportive of rural America,” and now they’re anxious, said Wallace Tyner, an economist at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. The RFS requires oil refiners to blend ethanol, mostly made from corn, and biodiesel, derived from soybeans, with petroleum. In the 13 years since its inception, the mandate has been a key driver for grain demand. But the oil industry has taken issue with the law, saying that it’s too costly to comply with. Trump vowed his support for the RFS during campaign rallies in Midwestern states like Iowa, the leading U.S. corn grower and ethanol producer. He has repeated the pledge since taking office, and last fall ordered Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt to back down on possible changes to the law. Then in January, the largest U.S. East Coast oil refiner filed for bankruptcy and blamed the cost of complying with the mandate. That thrust the issue back onto the political agenda and spurred Trump to hold meetings -- the most recent one on Monday-- in an attempt to carve out a deal between the oil and agriculture lobbies. Tweet Storm The National Corn Growers Association, along with other groups, had its members send a barrage of tweets to Trump ahead of Monday’s meeting, reminding him of his promise to uphold the law. The threat to ethanol demand comes as the rural economy is already suffering from years of crop gluts. The oversupply sparked a prolonged rout for grain prices, and U.S. farmer incomes are projected to fall to a 12-year low in 2018. At the same time, China has retaliated to Trump’s hard-line stance on trade with a plan for duties on about $50 billion of U.S. imports, including a host of agriculture products. On Monday, Trump acknowledged the impending pain that farmers may feel from the trade war. “Our farmers are great patriots,” Trump said to Washington reporters. “They understand that they’re doing this for the country. We’ll make it up to them.” Farmers like Hettver see the trade impact from China’s duties as more of a done deal, but are holding out hope that Trump will stand by his ethanol pledges and spare them extra hardship. “I hope he holds that promise because after what’s happened with the tariffs, we really need the RFS,” Hettver, who’s also president of the Minnesota Corn Growers Association, said in a telephone interview. “We’ve been tightening our belts for five years.” Some oil refiners are using the meetings with Trump to push for a ceiling on the price of Renewable Identification Numbers, or RINs. Refiners without the capability to blend ethanol or biodiesel to meet the annual consumption targets under the law have to buy the credits. Prices have been volatile amid the Washington meetings. RINs Impact Hettver cited studies, including one from Iowa State University in Ames, that a cap on RINs would lower the price of corn. Based on his average annual yield, he says that means he has “$50,000 at risk.” Meanwhile, the Chinese duties could mean a hit of $23,000 to his soy profits. In an April 6 letter to Iowa’s Republican Senators Chuck Grassley and Joni Ernst, ethanol proponents in the state, including Archer-Daniels-Midland Co. and Green Plains Inc., urged the legislators to tell Trump that a cap would be “viewed as nothing less than a declaration of war on rural America and a complete abdication of his repeated promises to protect the RFS.” The coalition also called for Trump to approve the year-round sale of higher blends of ethanol, “in light of the harmful Chinese tariffs on the Midwest farm sector.” In an April 6 statement, Grassley also referenced the trade spats and said that any waiver or caps on the credits would undermine the mandate and “deal a massive blow to rural America.” Source: Dakota Farmer
Common Ragweed Major Soybean Yield Robber
  When it comes to the range of weeds — resistant and otherwise — plaguing Nebraska crop fields, common ragweed may not be the highest on growers' radars. However, a recent study by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln shows common ragweed may pose a greater threat to soybean yields than previously thought. Ethann Barnes, weed science graduate student at UNL who led the research, notes the study compared different densities of common ragweed planted into soybeans during the 2015 and 2016 growing seasons at the Eastern Nebraska Research and Extension Center (ENREC) near Mead. This includes the low end of the spectrum, with two common ragweed plants per meter on a 30-inch row. The densest stands, however, were 12 plants per meter. "When you look at a field with two plants per meter, that's still complete coverage of common ragweed. That's not a weed here or there," Barnes says. "With 12 plants per meter, you're looking at a weed every 3 to 4 inches apart." Emergence makes a difference In 2015, both densities took their toll on soybean yields. With two plants per meter, soybean yields suffered a 76% reduction. With 12 plants per meter, yields were reduced by at least 95%. However, the following year, the reductions weren't as severe. Two plants per meter reduced yields by 40%, compared to an 80% reduction with 12 plants per meter. "We attributed that difference to the time of weed emergence. In 2015, the common ragweed we planted emerged a little earlier than the soybean did. It was about a week advantage over the soybean," Barnes explains. "In 2016, it emerged on the same day the soybean did." Based on Barnes's previous research, 90% of common ragweed emergence usually occurs before the average soybean planting time — typically before the first or second week of May. So, what can be done to control common ragweed — especially glyphosate-resistant common ragweed — when there are few options for postemergence weed control in soybean? Options for pre-plant control During a three-year study, Barnes also evaluated how tillage affects weed emergence. "Sometimes tillage can stimulate emergence of weeds like lambsquarters," he says. "Sometimes just tilling the soil brings seeds from the seed bank to the surface. If you till, it's going to kill the already emerged plants, but it could also create a new flush from the seed bank. We wanted to make sure it didn't do that with common ragweed. We didn't find any indication that tillage would affect the emergence pattern." "You could have 90% emergence of common ragweed, and do some light preplant tillage to kill already emerged seedlings before planting," he adds. "It's not for everybody, but I think growers need to weigh the potential benefits and the costs of tillage." In a separate two-year study, Barnes compared control options for resistant common ragweed in LibertyLink soybean and their gross profit margins, including a single preplant burndown application, a preplant followed by a preemergence application and postemergence application, a preemergence application followed by early and late-post applications, and a post-only application. "The two-pass programs always made the most sense economically as long as you had enough to burndown, the common ragweed is 90% emerged, and you have some residual," he says. "The burndown application was the most important before planting with a little residual, followed by a post application of glufosinate with another mode of action." While common ragweed can be found throughout the state, it's much more widespread in southeast Nebraska, Barnes notes. Previous studies determining the yield impact of common ragweed have mostly focused on the southeastern U.S. and Canada, where growing conditions and cultural practices vary greatly from those in Nebraska. Meanwhile, common ragweed is often overlooked, especially with other weeds like Palmer amaranth on the radar. "Common ragweed is a big potential threat, but there are other weeds growers are more focused on," Barnes says. "However, we found out there is a lot more yield impact from common ragweed than we thought." Source: Nebraska Farmer
Summer row crop futures are higher this morning to start the week. ...
Summer row crop futures are higher this morning to start the week. Weekend rainfall came in as expected for the Hard-Red Winter Wheat belt. Planters are rolling across the Eastern Corn Belt and planting should gain some momentum this week. Friday's Cattle on Feed report as of April 1st, showed Cattle on Feed at 107.4% vs last year. March placements came in at 90.7% and marketing?s at 96.1%. The USDA will report crop progress this afternoon and the market is expecting to 4-6% planted compared to our 13% average. On the open at 8:30 a.m., May corn +1 at 3.77-1/2, May Beans +1-3/4 at 10.30-1/2, May KC Wheat +4-1/2 at 4.87-1/4.>
National
Feeding dairy cattle while milk prices remain low
  A professor emeritus at the University of Illinois has some advice for dairy farmers trying to stay profitable during this tight margin environment. Mike Hutjens points to some measurement tools that look at the quality of forages at harvest, during fermentation, and even manure samples, in an effort to increase efficiency.     Continue reading Feeding dairy cattle while milk prices remain low at Brownfield Ag News.      
Fieldwork remains delayed in many areas
Across the Corn Belt, mild, dry weather in the upper Midwest contrasts with cool, showery conditions in the Ohio Valley. By April 22, corn planting had not begun, and was at least 10 percentage points behind the 5-year average pace, in Iowa and Minnesota. During the 4-week period ending April 22, there were less than 2 days suitable for fieldwork in Minnesota (0.1 day), North Dakota (1.2 days), and South Dakota (1.7 days). On the Plains, dry weather prevails across drought-affected southern areas, where?despite recent showers? topsoil moisture was rated at least one-half very short to short on April 22 in Texas (67%), Kansas (64%), Colorado (53%), and Oklahoma (53%). Continue reading Fieldwork remains delayed in many areas at Brownfield Ag News.      
CME dairy prices mixed Tuesday
Dairy prices were mixed Tuesday at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. ?Class Three April milk was unchanged at $14.52 a hundredweight. ?May was up $.04 at $15.13. June was up $.06 to 15.55. July was up $.06 to $15.99. ?The milk futures from August through next March ranged from one to nine cents higher. Grade AA Butter was up $.0550 to $2.3750 per pound. ?Twenty-three carloads traded with prices between $2.33 and $2.3750. Continue reading CME dairy prices mixed Tuesday at Brownfield Ag News.      
Ag economist says a corn rally possible
A University of Illinois ag economist says there could be significantly lower corn production this year,??I do see corn setting up for a possible rally. There?s a very bullish outlook currently. Monitoring the weekly (USDA) planting progress reports is going to be important in the next few weeks.? Todd Hubbs says corn consumption continues to see support from ethanol, both production and exports. But, there are a few things that could slow that down, ?China just introduced another 15% tariff on ethanol and they had a big jump in February exports that helped our totals. Continue reading Ag economist says a corn rally possible at Brownfield Ag News.      
Pruitt says hardship waivers are not subjectively granted
The EPA administrator says so-called hardship waivers are not granted subjectively.? Scott Pruitt says granting the controversial waivers for Renewable Volume Obligations is under statutory constraint. Speaking Tuesday at the National Association of Farm Broadcasting Washington Watch, Pruitt said even if a refinery is part of a large company, waivers are considered plant by plant based on the capacity of the individual facility. ?I think there?s been a little bit of concern or perspective that perhaps we are engaged in a subjective analysis,? said Pruitt, ?that it?s a matter of policy that we?re engaging in the granting of these exemptions and that?s just simply not the case.? Ethanol supporters say the waivers effectively lower demand ? and therefore the price ? of Renewable Identification Numbers (RINs).? Continue reading Pruitt says hardship waivers are not subjectively granted at Brownfield Ag News.      
Senate Dems ask Perdue for help with Farm Bill partisan divide
Several Democrats on the Senate Ag Committee asked Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue to help calm the waters and the partisan divide over the House Ag Farm bill that was approved last week along party lines. Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar shared her concern with Perdue at the committee hearing Tuesday on the ?state of rural America.? ?The Farm Bill is just so incredibly important this year and we are looking at a very bipartisan way in the Senate and is there any way you can use your cheery influence to get the House to see that in that way?? asked Klobuchar, ?Because, I?m just so concerned about the divide that?s going on over there.? Perdue did not directly answer Klobuchar?s question about helping but last week testified at a hearing in full support of the SNAP work requirements included in the House Farm Bill which Democrats oppose. Continue reading Senate Dems ask Perdue for help with Farm Bill partisan divide at Brownfield Ag News.      
Hog futures down on pork supply, demand pressure
  Chicago Mercantile Exchange live cattle futures were mixed, mostly lower on a lack of follow through buying and position squaring ahead of this week’s widespread direct cash business. Also, while beef was higher at midday, it wasn’t up to the degree it had been in previous sessions. April was down $.62 at $121.10 and June was up $.17 at $105.05. Feeder cattle were mixed on the same factors as the live pit. Continue reading Hog futures down on pork supply, demand pressure at Brownfield Ag News.      
A warm-up ahead for the Heartland
A slow-moving storm will drift northward along the Atlantic Seaboard, reaching New England on Thursday. Additional rainfall associated with the storm could reach 1 to 2 inches in the middle and northern Atlantic States. Meanwhile, a smaller disturbance will trail the initial storm, following a similar path across the Plains, South, and East, and delivering some additional showers. Toward week?s end, cool, showery weather will overspread the Northwest. Elsewhere, warm air will gradually shift eastward from the western U.S., encompassing much of the Plains and the Midwest by the weekend. Continue reading A warm-up ahead for the Heartland at Brownfield Ag News.      
Corn up on slow planting pace
  Soybeans were mixed, mostly firm on old crop/new crop spread adjustments. Argentina bought 130,000 tons of U.S. beans, 60,000 tons for this marketing year and 70,000 for next marketing year, likely for crush purposes and possibly to resell. Argentina is usually the world?s biggest exporter of soybean products, but production was slashed this year by drought or near drought conditions. Beans remain nervous about China?s proposed 25% import tariff, which is keeping export demand for U.S. Continue reading Corn up on slow planting pace at Brownfield Ag News.      
Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: April 24, 2018
May corn closed at $3.81 and 1/4,?up 2 and 3/4?cents May soybeans closed at $10.22 and 1/4,?up 1 and 1/2?cents May soybean meal closed at $372.10,?up 30 cents May soybean oil closed at 31.01,?down?3?points May wheat closed at $4.72 and 1/2,?up 11?cents Apr. live cattle closed at $121.10,?down 62 cents Jun. lean hogs closed at $74.82,?down?$1.55 Jun. Continue reading Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: April 24, 2018 at Brownfield Ag News.      
Agriculture battles ?big is bad? consumer bias
Consumers are not convinced that ?bigger is better? when it comes to farming. Terry Fleck of the Center for Food Integrity (CFI) says as the size and scale of farming grows, so does the public?s skepticism about large farming operations. ?Big Agriculture just doesn?t feel right to a lot of consumers,? Fleck says. ?When they hear of large farms, they really wonder whether or not large farming has their best interests at heart.? Fleck says there?s a perception that profit is the overriding motive on large farms, ?and that large means we are just about efficiencies and making more money?at the expense of the earth.? At the same time, Fleck believes agriculture has ?a golden opportunity? to move the needle with consumers. Continue reading Agriculture battles ‘big is bad’ consumer bias at Brownfield Ag News.      
The 117th day of January
One of my friends on social media suggested last week that it was not mid-April, but the 117th day of January. Blizzards, wildfires, flooding and drought all occurred somewhere in the heartland of this country on that day. I was ashamed of myself for complaining about snow flurries and icy winds when I learned of the devastation caused by wildfires in Oklahoma. ?I choked back tears when I talked to my friends in western Iowa who were in the peak of calving season when Mother Nature dumped a foot of snow and 50 mile-per-hour winds on their farm. Continue reading The 117th day of January at Brownfield Ag News.      
Agriculture Education touted as a broad degree
A high school agriculture instructor in southeast Minnesota says a degree in ag education can lead to many successful career paths.   Paul Aarsvold teaches at Plainview-Elgin-Millville. He says there is a huge shortage of ag educators, but sees enthusiasm for the profession increasing because of the value of the degree. “You can go into so many different things.? You have people skills training because of the teaching background.? Continue reading Agriculture Education touted as a broad degree at Brownfield Ag News.      
FFA gives Minnesota member opportunity she never expected
The state treasurer for Minnesota FFA says the organization gives members opportunities they?d never expect.   Spencer Flood of the Dassel-Cokato chapter in central Minnesota says she was surprised to receive an invitation to be part of the National Ag Day ceremony while visiting Washington, D.C. last month. Flood was asked to introduce Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue and had the chance to visit with Mike Pence. “I never imagined when I put my blue jacket on six years ago that I would be introducing the Secretary of Agriculture and meeting the Vice President.? Continue reading FFA gives Minnesota member opportunity she never expected at Brownfield Ag News.      
Midday cash livestock markets
  Direct cash cattle markets are at a standstill. Packer inquiry is very light and while asking prices are not well defined, they could start around $125 on the live basis. Widespread business isn’t expected to start until the second half of the week. Until then, buyers and sellers will monitor the futures market and wholesale trade, which may have turned its seasonal corner. This week’s offering at the Fed Cattle Exchange is 3,194 head, with results out late Wednesday morning. Continue reading Midday cash livestock markets at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
ADAMA to Launch Soybean Fungicide in Brazil
Global crop protection company ADAMA has announced that is ready to launch its distinctive fungicide, CRONNOS, in Brazil, the world?s largest soybean market. A final regulatory approval from the Agricultural Ministry is expected in the coming days. CRONNOS is a unique three-way mixture fungicide for soybean rust, including a multisite protectant. Its liquid formulation, CRONNOS …
Morning Market Audio 4/25/18
Grain Traders Deal With More Than Slow Planting Pace
Grain Traders Deal With More Than Slow Planting Pace
Ongoing drought and wildfires have cattle ranchers in at least five So
Ongoing drought and wildfires have cattle ranchers in at least five Southwestern U.S. states scrambling for hay or pastureland, while others are selling off some of their herds.
Bayer To Conservation Leaders: We Hear You
Ahead of its planned acquisition of Monsanto, the agribusiness convened a farmer, a former U.S. agriculture secretary and NGO experts. They discussed how the company can use its scale to do good in the world.
Agritalk After The Bell Host Breaks things down with Pro Farmer editor
Agritalk After The Bell Host Breaks things down with Pro Farmer editor Brian Grete. Newsman Davis Michaelsen catches us up on today's market action.
In this story from the Arkansas Farm Bureau, a cattle producer is demo
In this story from the Arkansas Farm Bureau, a cattle producer is demonstrating his involvement in the local food movement.
Americans say they care more about animal welfare than children?s educ
Americans say they care more about animal welfare than children?s education and hunger.
Monsanto Collaborates with Adjuvants Unlimited
Monsanto Company announced today that it has collaborated with Adjuvants Unlimited, LLC to develop the first-ever agricultural sprayer system cleaner designed to deactivate dicamba.
Bayer in New Alliance to Provide Solutions for Smallholders
The new alliance will develop sustainable and scalable business models with local partners to improve livelihoods and food security.
Kline: Insecticide Market for Grain Storage Growing Steadily
Aluminum phosphide is the predominant active ingredient used for treatments, accounting for over 50% of the total sales in 2017.
A troubling trend
Morning Market Audio 4/24/18
The effects of worrying about what to eat or not eat are far ?more ins
The effects of worrying about what to eat or not eat are far ?more insidious than any overindulgent amount of ?bad food? can ever be, says this doctor.​
During low-profit years for farmers, off-farm income can improve the o
During low-profit years for farmers, off-farm income can improve the odds of farm survival.