CORN  
Delivery Date Cash Price Basis Futures Change Futures Price
History Apr17 3.21 04/24/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.39
 2'4
359'4
History May17 3.23 04/24/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.37
 2'4
359'4
History Jun17 3.24 04/24/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.42
 1'6
365'4
History Jul17 3.26 04/24/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.40
 1'6
365'4
History Aug17 3.30 04/24/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.43
 1'4
372'4
History Sep17 3.30 04/24/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.43
 1'4
372'4
History Oct17 3.43 04/24/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.40
 1'2
383'2
History Nov17 3.43 04/24/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.40
 1'2
383'2
 
SOYBEANS  
Delivery Date Cash Price Basis Futures Change Futures Price
History Apr17 8.70 04/24/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.90
 8'6
959'6
History May17 8.72 04/24/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.98
 9'4
970'2
History Jun17 8.74 04/24/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.96
 9'4
970'2
History Jul17 8.76 04/24/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.94
 9'4
970'2
History Oct17 8.70 04/24/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.95
 5'6
965'2
Local
$3 Billion Nitrogen Fertilizer Plant Goes Online in SE Iowa
The small southeast Iowa town of Wever is now home to the nation's first nitrogen fertilizer plant built in more than 25 years. Iowa Fertilizer Company officially began production at its Wever plant Wednesday. "With the start of production, Iowa Fertilizer Company is now delivering a reliable high quality and domestic supply of nitrogen fertilizers that will help meet the needs of farmers in Iowa, the Midwest and around the country," Iowa Fertilizer Company President Larry Holley said. The plant will produce around 1.5 to 2 million metric tons of nitrogen fertilizer annually and has the capability to produce 4,740 tons of ammonium nitrate solutions; 1,320 of Granular Urea; 2,425 tons of ammonia; and 990 tons of diesel exhaust fluid daily. Workers can switch production between products at short notice depending on market demand. "Iowa leads the nation in corn production and if we were a country, we'd be the 4th largest corn producing country in the world" Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey said. "To maintain the fertility and productivity of our valuable soils, Iowa is largest consumer of fertilizer in America. This new plant will provide another Iowa source for fertilizer and reduce the need for imported fertilizer in Iowa and across the nation. This plant is also another example of the wonderful agribusinesses we have in our state that create good jobs in our communities while providing vital products to our state's farmers." Ahmed El-Hoshy is CEO of OCI Americas, IFCo's parent company. He says the plant also helped boost the local economy in Lee County. "Iowa Fertilizer is the result of over $3 billion of investments to build our new facility here in Wever and has helped drive meaningful job creation throughout the state and broader region," Hoshy said. Lee County has had one of the highest unemployment rates in the state. Since the groundbreaking of Iowa Fertilizer Company, unemployment dropped from 8% to 5.3%. Governor Terry Branstad was glad the company picked Iowa for the plants location. "By collaborating with the state and local economic development leaders, Democrat and Republican officials from here in Southeast Iowa, the agriculture community, and the company itself, we were able to secure what has become one of the largest private sector projects in our state's history," Branstad said. During peaking construction, the plant employed 3,500 workers. It currently employs over 200 full-time workers to operate the plant. Annual payroll will be $25 million and $25 million in maintenance spending. Source: AgriMarketing

National
Canada trade dispute puts some Minnesota dairy farmers on the brink
The executive director of the Minnesota Milk Producers Association says an extreme supply and demand situation has put at least eight Minnesota dairy farmers on the brink of going out of business. Lucas Sjostrum?tells Brownfield ultra-filtered milk duties recently imposed by Canada have left dozens of U.S. producers scrambling to find other destinations for their milk. “Had this happened any other time, these farmers probably would have found another market immediately and continued on.? Continue reading Canada trade dispute puts some Minnesota dairy farmers on the brink at Brownfield Ag News.      
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GIVEAWAY TIME! Send us your planting pictures and your name will be ...
GIVEAWAY TIME! Send us your planting pictures and your name will be entered into a drawing for a $100 Cabela's gift card! We will be giving away one gift card a week for 5 weeks so keep those pictures coming! Here is how to get your name into the drawing: 1. Take a planting picture (don't be afraid to include some smiling faces!) 2. Post that picture to our Facebook page (Aurora Cooperative) or tag us on Twitter @AuroraAgNetwork 3. Be sure to like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.>
Congratulations to our $500 Aurora Cooperative Annual Scholarship ...
Congratulations to our $500 Aurora Cooperative Annual Scholarship Winners for 2017! We are excited to see where the Ag industry takes you in the future! Elly Dahl -- Courtland, Kan. Blake Kirchhoff -- Hardy, Neb. Keatton Reese -- Pleasanton, Neb. Blake Bauer -- Fairbury, Neb. Michaela Cunningham -- Fullerton, Neb. Jacob Simonson -- St. Libory, Neb. Michelle Unruh -- Webber, Kan. Lily Woitaszewski -- Wood River, Neb. Donovan Buss -- York, Neb. Landon Wright -- Hastings, Neb.>
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Congratulations to this April's winner Chad Carlson of Aurora! Chad ...
Congratulations to this April's winner Chad Carlson of Aurora! Chad was nominated for dedicating time to the youth of the Aurora Community by serving as a high school track coach along with doing his job here at Aurora Cooperative. Congrats Chad! Thank you for going above and beyond for your community!>
AURORA AG NETWORK Local Growing Degree Unit Information for Your Farm ...
AURORA AG NETWORK Local Growing Degree Unit Information for Your Farm Every Monday morning we will be posting the GDU temps for the previous 10 days as well as provide you a forecast for the upcoming 10 days for the western, central and eastern regions. Here are some things to think about for the upcoming week of 4/17/17: ? Ideal soil temps for corn are a consistent 50?F (or above), with adequate field moisture. ? Temperature volatility ? Our AquaSpy moisture probes indicate temperatures are fluctuating as much as 18?F at the 4? depth, from the heat of the day to the low of the night. This fluctuation can be much wider at the common planting depth of 2?. ? Be aware of your current field conditions. Fields with heavy residue can be 6? - 8?F cooler than bare ground. ? What will conditions be in the 48 hours after planting? Rapid seed water uptake (imbibition) occurs in this window and can adversely affect germination if weather or soil temperatures turn cold during this period. ? We have observed significant soil temperature fluctuation the last several days. Based on the 10-day forecast, we expect to see this soil temperature variation continue. We know that when your plants EMERGE together, they will WIN together.>
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Aurora Coop Tire Service rocks! Thank you to Todd Kroger for coming ...
Aurora Coop Tire Service rocks! Thank you to Todd Kroger for coming out on a Friday night so the cows don't have to go hungry!>
Aurora Ag Network ? Local Growing Degree Unit Information ? Each ...
Aurora Ag Network ? Local Growing Degree Unit Information ? Each week we will be providing an update on GDU?s along with key action items for you to be considering on your farm given where we are in terms of GDU?s. Things to think about for the upcoming week of 4/17/17 ? Ideal soil temps for corn are a consistent 50?F (or above), with adequate field moisture. ? Temperature volatility ? Our AquaSpy moisture probes indicate temperatures are fluctuating as much as 18?F at the 4? depth, from the heat of the day to the low of the night. This fluctuation can be much wider at the common planting depth of 2?. ? Be aware of your current field conditions. Fields with heavy residue can be 6? - 8?F cooler than bare ground. ? What will conditions be in the 48 hours after planting? Rapid seed water uptake (imbibition) occurs in this window and can adversely affect germination if weather or soil temperatures turn cold during this period. ? We have observed significant soil temperature fluctuation the last several days. Based on the 10-day forecast, we expect to see this soil temperature variation continue. We know that when your plants EMERGE together, they will WIN together. Click this link to see how you can significantly increase your chances to WIN with you EMERGENCE this year. http://auroracoop.com/img/pdf/GROW%20program%20--%20Emergence.pdf>
Congratulations to our $1,000 Aurora Cooperative Annual Scholarship ...
Congratulations to our $1,000 Aurora Cooperative Annual Scholarship Winners for 2017! It's our honor to help each of these outstanding young people further their education and achieve their goals within the agricultural field!>
Employment Opportunity Byron/Hubbell branch is accepting applications ...
Employment Opportunity Byron/Hubbell branch is accepting applications for a full-time Location Manager with full benefits. Knowledge of grain grading, movement, conditioning and inventories required. Must be able to obtain class A CDL. Send application and/or resume to Todd Bellis at 2201 East 1st Street, Superior, NE 68978. Aurora Cooperative is an Equal Opportunity Employer.>
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Awesome picture shared from one of our Texas locations. The aurora ...
Awesome picture shared from one of our Texas locations. The aurora cooperative aerial team is ready to fly for your farm.>
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Local
$3 Billion Nitrogen Fertilizer Plant Goes Online in SE Iowa
The small southeast Iowa town of Wever is now home to the nation's first nitrogen fertilizer plant built in more than 25 years. Iowa Fertilizer Company officially began production at its Wever plant Wednesday. "With the start of production, Iowa Fertilizer Company is now delivering a reliable high quality and domestic supply of nitrogen fertilizers that will help meet the needs of farmers in Iowa, the Midwest and around the country," Iowa Fertilizer Company President Larry Holley said. The plant will produce around 1.5 to 2 million metric tons of nitrogen fertilizer annually and has the capability to produce 4,740 tons of ammonium nitrate solutions; 1,320 of Granular Urea; 2,425 tons of ammonia; and 990 tons of diesel exhaust fluid daily. Workers can switch production between products at short notice depending on market demand. "Iowa leads the nation in corn production and if we were a country, we'd be the 4th largest corn producing country in the world" Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey said. "To maintain the fertility and productivity of our valuable soils, Iowa is largest consumer of fertilizer in America. This new plant will provide another Iowa source for fertilizer and reduce the need for imported fertilizer in Iowa and across the nation. This plant is also another example of the wonderful agribusinesses we have in our state that create good jobs in our communities while providing vital products to our state's farmers." Ahmed El-Hoshy is CEO of OCI Americas, IFCo's parent company. He says the plant also helped boost the local economy in Lee County. "Iowa Fertilizer is the result of over $3 billion of investments to build our new facility here in Wever and has helped drive meaningful job creation throughout the state and broader region," Hoshy said. Lee County has had one of the highest unemployment rates in the state. Since the groundbreaking of Iowa Fertilizer Company, unemployment dropped from 8% to 5.3%. Governor Terry Branstad was glad the company picked Iowa for the plants location. "By collaborating with the state and local economic development leaders, Democrat and Republican officials from here in Southeast Iowa, the agriculture community, and the company itself, we were able to secure what has become one of the largest private sector projects in our state's history," Branstad said. During peaking construction, the plant employed 3,500 workers. It currently employs over 200 full-time workers to operate the plant. Annual payroll will be $25 million and $25 million in maintenance spending. Source: AgriMarketing
Herbicide Resistance: The Numbing Numbers From The Weed Wars
As in any war, the longer the conflict goes on, the higher the numbers associated with this fight grow. This has certainly been the case with the ongoing struggle between ag retailers/grower-customers and herbicide-resistant weeds. According to most weed scientists, the number of herbicide-resistant weeds currently residing in grower fields around the globe has expanded from a handful in the mid-1990s to 238 today, with these being resistant to 26 different kinds of herbicides. In the U.S., virtually every state (with the exception of Nevada) has at least one type of weed resistant to herbicide applications, with several having multiple types present. And although glyphosate-resistant weeds have received the lion’s share of attention from the marketplace, the entire notion of control using crop protection products is under attack. “Glyphosate-resistance is widespread,” says Dane Bowers, Herbicide Technical Product Lead for Syngenta. “And this is not limited to just glyphosate. All herbicides are now at risk.” Although the list of herbicide-resistant weeds is a long one, industry insiders point out that some varieties are much more problematic than others. For example, in Missouri — which has one of the highest figures when it comes to herbicide-resistant weed types — waterhemp is the undisputed general of the resistant weed army. “It’s a nightmare,” says Kevin Bradley, Associate Professor at the University of Missouri. “We have waterhemp on every acre. Every farmer today in the state makes their farming decisions each year based upon their waterhemp problem.” Making this problem even worse, adds Bradley, is the fact that an estimated 60% to 70% of these weeds now show resistance to multiple herbicides. “As weed scientists, we’ve looked high and low, and we can’t find waterhemp in Missouri that is not resistant to ALS, glyphosate, and PPO herbicides,” he says. “And some plants we find now are beginning to show resistance to 2,4-D as well.” In addition to waterhemp, the other key herbicide-resistant weed agriculture is waging all-out war against (and vice versa) is Palmer amaranth. Able to grow 2 to 3 inches per day, quickly reaching a height of up to 8 feet, and producing millions of seeds each season, Palmer amaranth has been shown in research to be able to reduce soybean yields by 79% when present. In corn, this figure can hit 91% in yield losses. Long a fixture in the Mid-South, Palmer amaranth has quickly spread much further north. Researchers discovered the weed for the first time in South Dakota in 2015 and in Minnesota in early 2017 (where it is suspected to have stowed away in a truck shipment of seed mix). “Palmer amaranth is quickly moving across a larger geography than we’ve seen with any other resistant weed,” says Bradley. “The movement is occurring through equipment, feed, seed, and even waterfowl.” Besides its ability to spread and reproduce, Palmer amaranth also has a well-earned reputation for quickly developing resistance to multiple herbicides. For instance, last October, the University of Missouri identified a population of Palmer amaranth with resistance to both glyphosate and PPO-inhibitors. Herbicide-Resistance by State Map To appreciate just how devastating a resistant Palmer amaranth invasion can be to growers, consider this cautionary tale from Dr. Jason Norsworthy, Professor at the University of Arkansas. “In the mid-1990s, growers in Arkansas were seeing widespread ALS resistance in Palmer amaranth,” says Norsworthy. “But then, Roundup Ready crops came along, and by 1999, virtually the entire state had adopted these for their fields. This meant everyone was spraying nothing but glyphosate year-after-year to control weeds.” By the early 2000s, he says, glyphosate was no longer proving effective as a lone weed control herbicide, so Arkansas growers began employing PPO-inhibitors into the mix. This worked for a few years. “Then in 2015, the wheels came off the wagon,” says Norsworthy. “That’s when PPO-resistant Palmer amaranth showed up. Now, I have story after story in Arkansas of farmers who are no longer farming and bankrupt because of resistant weeds.” In all, he estimates approximately 25% of growers in the state have stopped farming over the past decade because of resistant weeds. Looking for New Troops As grower and weeds gear up the upcoming 2017 campaign, many experts believe that herbicide-resistant weeds will already have the upper hand because of Mother Nature. “This past winter was pretty warm compared with other years,” says Jenny Goodman, Global Product Manager, Corn and Soy for DuPont Crop Protection. “If this provides a longer growing season than normal, the weeds will also have a longer time to sprout and grow, too.” In recent years, many growers have started moving to alternatives to glyphosate-resistant crops such as the Roundup Ready varieties. For several years now, LibertyLink soybeans which work with glufosinate herbicides have been growing in popularity. For the 2017 season, says David Hollinrake, Vice President of North America Marketing, Crop Science for Bayer CropScience, the company estimates that approximately 15% of the nation’s 86 million soybean acres will be planted with LibertyLink seeds. In addition to the LibertyLink option, soybean growers will also have one other cropping system to employ in 2017 — dicamba-resistant soybeans. According to Dr. Bryan Young, Weed Scientist at Purdue University, this technology gives growers another control tool for their fields. “There is a serious challenge controlling weeds post-emergence in soybeans right now,” says Young. “Dicamba should help with this, especially with Palmer amaranth and waterhemp that is glyphosate and PPO resistant.” This year, several companies including Monsanto and DuPont are formally launching these cropping system, which are resistant to glyphosate, glufosinate, and dicamba herbicides. This is being supported by dicamba herbicide options from Monsanto (XtendiMax with VaporGrip technology), BASF (Engenia), and DuPont (FeXapan plus VaporGrip technology). “Soybean growers have an urgent need for updated herbicide solutions that help them fight the shifting weed populations they see in their fields,” says Timothy Glenn, President of DuPont Crop Protection. “Competitive weeds and the rapid encroachment of herbicide-resistant weed populations are limiting yield and grower profitability. FeXapan controls herbicide-resistant weeds including kochia, marestail, waterhemp, and Palmer amaranth as part of a complete weed-control program.” Also beginning to move into the herbicide-resistance weeds battle is the Enlist cropping system from Dow AgroSciences. Engineered to work with the herbicide 2,4-D, Enlist cotton is now being introduced into the U.S. market, according to John Chase, Portfolio Marketing Leader/Enlist Commercial Leader for the company. “And we are still waiting for import approvals from China for Enlist soybeans,” says Chase. “But once we have those, we are ready to move very quickly to get Enlist soybeans into the market as another option for growers to fight against resistant weeds.” Better Use of Existing Troops As these new post-emergence herbicide options enter the market, says Bill Johnson, Professor of Weed Science at Purdue University, they should provide better control than glyphosate on glyphosate-resistant populations, but overuse will eventually lead to the same old resistance problems. “We have to be realistic in our expectation. So if we get into a situation with only two shots of 2,4-D and dicamba postemerge, what’s going to happen three, four, or five years down the road?” asks Johnson. “We’re going to have resistance because we’re basically spraying that weed with one active ingredient. Because of the pricing situation with soybeans, I know that’s what the temptation is going to be, but we want to warn against that.” Some of the existing herbicide options for soybean growers looking for weed control for preemerge include BroadAxe XC (s-metolachlor+sulfentrazone) and Boundary 6.5 EC (s-metola?chlor+metribuzin) from Syngenta and Marvel (fluthiacet-methyl+fomesafen) from FMC Corp. In early 2017, Nufarm introduced Panther Pro (flumioxazin), which can be used in fall or spring burndown programs. Also newer for soybeans is Zone herbicide (sulfentrazone+chlorimuron ethyl) from Helm Agro US. According to Jan Stechmann, President of the company, Zone offers long-lasting residual control of annual broadleaf weeds “and excellent residual control when tank-mixed with burndown herbicides such as glyphosate, paraquat, glufosinate, and 2,4-D LVE.” In addition, Valent U.S.A. Corp. recently launched its new Valor EZ herbicide (flumioxazin). According to Dawn Refsell, Manager, Field Development, Midwest Commercial Unit for the company, Valor EZ is a liquid formulation for easier tank mixing and can be used as a residual partner on Roundup Ready Xtend crops. “Valor EZ can provide protection against a broad spectrum of weeds, including waterhemp and Palmer amaranth, for four to six weeks,” says Refsell. For corn growers, herbicides that offers multiple modes of action are becoming more of the norm. In the past year, products such as Acuron (atrazine+mesotrone+s-metolachlor+bicyclopyrone)/Auc??ron Flexi (mesotrone+s-metola?chlor+bicyclopyrone) from Syngenta and Resicore (acetochlor+clopyralid+mesotrione) from Dow AgroSciences have grown in popularity. “Corn growers are looking for ways to keep the weeds in their fields off-balance by using more modes of action,” says Lyndsie Kaehler, Corn Herbicide Product Manager for Dow. “Resicore delivers three different modes of action and is particularly good at controlling troublesome weeds such as marestail and waterhemp.” Using Other Combat Methods Experts say that agriculture must do all it can to keep trying to combat the spread of herbicide-resistant weeds. The potential losses to growers are staggering. According to a recent study from the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA), corn and soybean growers in the U.S. and Canada would lose approximately $43 billion in revenue annually if they lost all their abilities to control weed infestations in their crop fields. The study was conducted over a seven-year period and found that if all weed control practices were eliminated, the average yield loss for corn would be 52% and 49.5% for soybeans. “It’s an astonishing number and indicates the significant threat weeds present to crop production,” says Dr. Anita Dille of Kansas State University and Chair of the WSSA Weed Loss Committee. “It also drives home the importance of taking steps to mitigate the development of herbicide resistance. When a single herbicide is used repeatedly to the exclusion of other controls, weeds can become resistant and can grow unchecked.” For this reason, some agronomists are recommending growers consider non-herbicide methods to try to combat resistant weeds. For example, the use of wider row spacing or tillage can keep weed seeds from sprouting. Then there is the use of cover crops. According to researchers, cover crop residue can create an unfavorable environment for weeds by reducing the light and moisture available for germinating their seeds. In one study, preemergence herbicides were also added to an integrated program using cover crops and it found that Palmer amaranth population density and seed production were significantly reduced compared with using a glyphosate-only program. “Our study shows that farmers diversifying their weed management program can reduce both the preva?lence of resistant weeds and the size of the soil seedback,” says Dr. Nicholas Korres from the University of Kansas. “This can help extend the useful life of the herbicides they rely on for weed control.” Source: Eric Sfiligoj, CropLife
Calibrate Your Sprayer to Save Money on Pesticides
Pickup trucks need occasional tuneups and oil changes, so it stands to reason that a boom sprayer needs a checkup at least once a year before it’s driven out of the barn and onto fields to spray for pests. Sprayers should be calibrated to determine the actual rate at which they are applying pesticide, then adjustments can be made, said Erdal Ozkan, a professor and spray technology expert with the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. Applying too little pesticide might not sufficiently defeat a grower’s crawling and flying enemies, and applying too much wastes money, may damage the crop and increases the odds of contaminating ground water, Ozkan pointed out. “What people don’t know is that sprayers sometimes aren’t spraying the amount that people think they are,” Ozkan said. As a sprayer’s nozzles wear out, the rate of flow through them increases, so growers may be applying more pesticide than they need. “That’s like throwing away $25 for every $100 a grower spends on pesticides. Depending on the cost of the pesticides, the number of acres sprayed and the frequency of application, the money wasted could be in the thousands,” Ozkan said. This potential waste of money and pesticides can be avoided if sprayers are calibrated, he said. Before calibrating a boom sprayer, find out if all the nozzles are in good shape and free of any debris or dust. If they are clogged, clean them using a soft brush or wooden toothpick — not a knife or other sharp object. Then, fill the sprayer with water, turn the pump on and check the flow rate of each nozzle, at the desired pressure. Compare the output of each nozzle with the output expected when the nozzle is new at that same pressure. If the difference between the two is less than or greater than 10 percent of the new nozzle output, that nozzle needs to be replaced. Once all the nozzles have been checked and cleaned or replaced, the sprayer is ready to be calibrated to ensure that it applies the desired amount of pesticide. Calibrating a boom sprayer is not as difficult as it sounds. Though several methods can be used, Ozkan recommends the following one that he considers to be easier and more practical than most methods: Fill the sprayer tank at least half full with water. Run the sprayer, inspect it for leaks and make sure all vital parts function properly. Measure the distance in inches between the nozzles. Measure an appropriate travel distance in the field based on this nozzle spacing. The appropriate distances for different nozzle spacings are as follows: 408 feet for a 10-inch spacing; 272 feet for a 15-inch spacing; 204 feet for a 20-inch spacing; 136 feet for a 30-inch spacing; and 102 feet for a 40-inch spacing. Drive through the measured distance in the field at your normal spraying speed and record the travel time in seconds. Repeat this procedure and average the two time measurements. With the sprayer parked, run the sprayer at the same pressure level and catch the output from each nozzle in a measuring jar for the travel time required in step 5. Calculate the average nozzle output by adding the individual outputs and then dividing by the number of nozzles tested. The final average nozzle output in ounces is equal to the application rate in gallons per acre. For example, if you catch an average of 15 ounces from a set of nozzles, the actual application rate of the sprayer is 15 gallons per acre. Compare the actual application rate with the recommended or intended rate. If the actual rate is more than 5 percent higher or lower than the recommended or intended rate, you must make adjustments in the spray pressure, the travel speed or both. For example, to increase the flow rate, you will need to either slow down or increase the spray pressure. The opposite is true when you need to reduce application rate. As you make these changes, stay within proper and safe operating conditions for the sprayer. Remember, increased pressure will result in increasing the number of small, drift-prone droplets. Repeat steps 5-8 above until the actual application rate is within a 5 percent difference of the intended rate. Calibrating a sprayer only once at the beginning of the spraying season is not enough to obtain an accurate application rate that is within 5 percent of the desired application rate. The sprayer should be calibrated whenever a grower goes from one field to another that has different soil conditions and/or topography. For safety reasons, sprayers should be calibrated using clean water only. Always use protective clothing, gloves and goggles when calibrating sprayers and applying pesticides. Some may argue that calibration is not needed if the sprayer has an automatic rate controller, which will give the set application rate regardless of changes in the travel speed. That is true only if the electronics in the rate controller are functioning properly, Ozkan pointed out. The controller determines the speed using a radar gun, rather than measuring the revolutions per minute of the wheel. The rotation speed of a wheel will change depending on the condition of the soil. When the soil is loose or the ground is wet, the wheels can slip, which could lead to an inaccurate measure of the rate at which pesticides are being applied. For more information about calibrating a sprayer, visit go.osu.edu/calibrateyoursprayer. Source: Ohio State University Extension
Scouting Advised for Alfalfa and Clover Leaf Weevils
Alfalfa weevils have been reported damaging alfalfa in north central Kansas and western Nebraska. As temperatures warm up, expect to see alfalfa weevil larvae in southern Nebraska and slightly later, in northern Nebraska. View all charts and graphics here. Both the alfalfa and clover leaf weevils feed on first cutting alfalfa as larvae, and regrowth after the first cutting as adults (and sometimes larvae). While research in northeast Nebraska has shown that clover leaf weevil larva feeding does not cause yield reduction to first cutting alfalfa, alfalfa weevil feeding can cause severe losses to yield and quality of the first cutting. This is why it's important to correctly identify the type of weevil feeding causing damage (Table 1). Clover Leaf Weevils Clover leaf weevils are occasionally a problem, but are vulnerable to fungus disease. These pests haven't been a problem since the late 80s to early 90s when spring rains were rare. Damage consisted of adults preventing regrowth after first cutting. Scouting To scout for clover leaf weevil, look in the debris around the crowns during day. Scratching in the soil around the crowns and counting the number of larvae found per crown will help give a better idea of clover leaf weevil infestation. Their brown heads will help distinguish them from the black-headed alfalfa weevil. (See comparison chart for more information distinguishing the clover leaf weevil and alfalfa weevil.) Even with the pressure of planting row crops, it is essential that producers growing high quality alfalfa hay make time to monitor fields for weevils now and over the next few weeks. In the Panhandle and in the northern tier of counties there may be two flushes of weevil larvae this spring, leading to regrowth damage after the first cutting. Alfalfa Weevils Life Cycle Most alfalfa weevils overwinter as adults, become active as temperatures increase, and lay eggs. Some may lay eggs in the stem during fall and, if winter is not too severe, will successfully overwinter. These eggs will hatch earlier than those laid in spring. This is most likely to occur in southern counties. In some areas of Nebraska, alfalfa weevils are not following this seasonal pattern. In the Panhandle and in the northern tier of counties there may be two flushes of weevil larvae in the spring as seems to be the case this year. In the last few years some areas of the state have received damage to regrowth after the first cutting due to a combination of late larval feeding and adult feeding. This is something to be aware of after the first cutting. While alfalfa weevil damage has been spotty in much of Nebraska over the past few years, the potential for damage always exists. Even with the pressure of planting row crops, it is essential that producers growing high quality alfalfa hay make time to monitor fields for weevils over the next few weeks. Scouting Alfalfa weevil damage consists of small holes and interveinal feeding on the newest leaflets near the stem tips. The larvae are small (1/16 to 3/8 inch long) and pale yellowish green, becoming a darker green when larger. These legless worms have black heads and a white stripe the length of the back. The alfalfa weevil larvae spend nearly all their time on the plant. They curl into a C-shape when disturbed. Once the alfalfa is high enough to use a sweep net, take a sample to establish whether weevils are present. If they are, randomly select at least five sampling sites from across the entire field. At each site, gently pick or cut at least 10 alfalfa stems at ground level. Shake the larvae off the stems by beating the stems into a deep-sided bucket. Count the larvae and determine the average number of larvae per stem. Make sure to check for small larvae that may be enclosed in new, folded leaflets at the tips of the stems. Measure stem lengths and determine the average stem height. Use these averages in Table 2 to determine the appropriate action. Economic Thresholds Economic thresholds have been developed to aid decision making on alfalfa weevil control (Table 2). These thresholds were derived by North Dakota State University entomologists (Beauzay et al. 2013; http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/pubs/plantsci/pests/e1676.pdf ) from a two-year study conducted at the UNL Agricultural Research and Development Center near Mead in 1990 and 1991 (Peterson et al. 1993). These guidelines can fluctuate depending on growing conditions and variety. Deciding whether to treat or re-sample depends on the average number of weevils per stem, the stem length, treatment costs, and the value of the alfalfa. When alfalfa reaches 50% or more bud stage, it may be more profitable to cut the alfalfa early than treat it. Insecticides Because alfalfa weevil natural enemies (e.g., lady beetles and parasitoid wasps) have the potential to keep weevils from reaching economic injury levels, use insecticides only when necessary. Many insecticides are registered to control alfalfa weevil larvae. See the most recent edition of the Guide for Weed Management in Nebraska with Insecticide and Fungicide Information (EC130) for rates and restrictions of commonly used insecticides for alfalfa weevil larval control. They differ in their modes of action and pre-harvest intervals. Highly effective insecticides for alfalfa weevil control include those that are pyrethroids (active ingredient ends in "thrin") and products containing indoxacarb (e.g., Steward). Pyrethroid insecticides also provide aphid control but can have detrimental effects on beneficial insects. Indoxacarb products are more selective and do not affect most beneficial insects but will not provide aphid control. Resources Integrated Pest Management of Alfalfa Weevil in North Dakota (E1676), by Patrick B. Beauzay, Janet J. Knodel, G.A.S.M. Ganehiarachchi, 2013. NSDU Extension Service, Fargo, ND. Yield Responses of Alfalfa to Simulated Alfalfa Weevil Injury and Development of Economic Injury Levels by R.K.D. Peterson, S.D. Danielson and L.G. Higley, 1993. Agronomy Journal 85: 595-601; view abstract. Source: University of Nebraska CropWatch
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GIVEAWAY TIME! Send us your planting pictures and your name will be ...
GIVEAWAY TIME! Send us your planting pictures and your name will be entered into a drawing for a $100 Cabela's gift card! We will be giving away one gift card a week for 5 weeks so keep those pictures coming! Here is how to get your name into the drawing: 1. Take a planting picture (don't be afraid to include some smiling faces!) 2. Post that picture to our Facebook page (Aurora Cooperative) or tag us on Twitter @AuroraAgNetwork 3. Be sure to like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.>
Congratulations to our $500 Aurora Cooperative Annual Scholarship ...
Congratulations to our $500 Aurora Cooperative Annual Scholarship Winners for 2017! We are excited to see where the Ag industry takes you in the future! Elly Dahl -- Courtland, Kan. Blake Kirchhoff -- Hardy, Neb. Keatton Reese -- Pleasanton, Neb. Blake Bauer -- Fairbury, Neb. Michaela Cunningham -- Fullerton, Neb. Jacob Simonson -- St. Libory, Neb. Michelle Unruh -- Webber, Kan. Lily Woitaszewski -- Wood River, Neb. Donovan Buss -- York, Neb. Landon Wright -- Hastings, Neb.>
Wet Week for Southern Plains, Midwest
An active weather pattern provided above-normal precipitation during the USDM period (April 11-18) in much of the Southern Plains, West, Northwest, and parts of the Midwest. Below-normal precipitation dominated the Rockies, Southwest, Southeast and Northeast. Average daytime temperatures were generally above normal across much of the CONUS with the exception of the Northwest where temperatures were generally 3 degrees cooler than normal. Much of the Mid-Atlantic, Ohio Valley and Central Plains were 9-12 degrees above normal for the period. Drought conditions expanded and intensified for much of the Southeast where the lack of rains have begun to parch the soils. In the South, Texas continues to see above normal precipitation resulting in a continual decrease in overall area covered in drought (D1-D4). Meanwhile in the West, the onslaught of Pacific storms continue to bring copious amounts of moisture to the region, swelling the reservoirs, threatening snowpack records and padding the record high precipitation amounts. Additional information on the indices, impacts and changes in drought status can be found in the regional sections below. View drought monitor here. Southeast Recent dryness in central and southern Georgia prompted the expansion of Dx in the area. While a majority of streamflow gauges are at running at normal levels at 7 days the 1-, 14- and 28-day average flows are in the 10-20 percentile category. Only 1-3 inches of rain has fallen in central and southern Georgia during the past 30 days, less than 50 percent of normal. SPI’s at 60 and 90 days are showing D1-D3 drought. As a result, D2 was introduced in southwest and southeast Georgia. In central Georgia, topsoil’s are drying out (56 percent short to very short of moisture across GA) as precipitation is around 50 percent of normal during the last 30 days. Stream flows are less than 10 percent at the 28-day period. This area was one of the epicenters of the Southeast drought of 2016 and just recovered in January and February of this year. Moderate drought (D1) was introduced this week in central Georgia linking with the newly introduced D1 in eastern Alabama. In Alabama, dryness is reflected in the low stream flows, some of which are showing D2-D4 levels of drought. Precipitation in the southern part of the state is 50 percent of normal during the last 30 days. Abnormally dry conditions (D0) were introduced in Mobile County and expanded south in the central part of the state. Elsewhere in Alabama, Dx was expanded due to the recent dryness. No changes were made in North Carolina, however it was noted that the beneficial rains in late March into early April resulted in some good short-term improvements, however, hydrologic conditions appear to be shifting back towards below-normal levels. This is a situation that is being closely monitored. South Heavy rain across the Oklahoma and Texas border late in the USDM period led to the contraction of drought. In northeast Texas, there were reports of 1-6 inches while in southeast Oklahoma a swath of 2-3 inches was recorded. These recent rains helped alleviate some long term deficits across much of Oklahoma. One-category improvements were made in the Panhandle as well as the eastern half of Oklahoma. Much of the western half of Oklahoma has seen above normal precipitation amounts (200-300 percent of normal) for the 30-day period. In Tennessee, stream flows at all levels are struggling to rebound from the dryness of the past 12-months. Flows in central Tennessee are averaging 10-20 percent at the 14- and 28-day periods. Heavy precipitation continues to miss this area as amounts are 75 percent of normal at 30-, 60-, and 180-day intervals. This drought / dryness propagates westward into eastern Arkansas and northwestern Mississippi where 30-day departures are 1-2 inches below normal. There was little rainfall during the period in Alabama, exasperating conditions there. Average 28-day streamflow values are registering below 30 percent as precipitation is 50 percent of normal at the 30- and 60-day time periods. The conditions are most dire in the east central part of the state where D1 was expanded. Moderate drought (D1) expanded in the northern part of Alabama as well. Midwest After a wetter than normal 30-day period in a large swath stretching northeastward from northern Missouri and southern Iowa into northern Illinois and southern Wisconsin and the entire Upper Peninsula of Michigan, the pattern shifted slightly northward. Wetter than normal conditions during the past 7-days were concentrated along southern Minnesota, much of Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Precipitation totals in that area were 400 percent of normal. The precipitation surplus can be traced back to the last 12-months (April 2016-March 2017), Minnesota’s third wettest and Wisconsin’s fifth wettest such period in 122 years. Within this region, there are two areas of drier than normal conditions. The first area of below normal 30-day precipitation is along the Kentucky, Indiana, and Illinois border. Parts of the area have received less than 2 inches of rain the past 30 days, 50 percent of normal. Another, larger area is covering most of Minnesota where deficits are generally about 1.5 inches below normal the past 30 days. No changes were made in this region however, the D0 area east of the Mississippi River is being monitored for possible improvement next week. High Plains Precipitation in the High Plains region for the period was quiet for the most part with the exception of precipitation in eastern South Dakota and eastern Nebraska. Totals there amounted to about an inch or less, near to slightly above normal. Elsewhere was dry as the frontal systems that made it through were starved of moisture. In eastern Colorado, moderate drought (D1) was lifted along the Colorado and Kansas border as short and long term indicators appear to have mostly rebounded from the drought that began in that area last autumn. Also in eastern Kansas, D0 was trimmed back following the above normal precipitation at 60 days. West New Mexico had its warmest start to the year through March, while Arizona had its fourth warmest start. It was reported that the grasses in southeast Arizona are drying up quickly after greening up earlier than usual. For New Mexico as a whole, 61 percent of top soils are short or very short of moisture. The abnormally dry conditions prompted the expansion of D0 across the southern borders of both Arizona and New Mexico. In western Colorado, snowpack was generally above normal for the season and with an early and fast melt occurring, stream flows are generally much above average. However, the Yampa/White Basin was one of the only areas in the Upper Colorado River Basin that did not reach average peak snowpack. It was reported that not only is the snow melting early, but the crops are coming out of dormancy earlier than usual. Because of the warmer than normal temperatures, low elevation snow pack as disappeared much earlier than normal. Due to the above mentioned conditions, D0 was expanded to the north and west stretching across the Wyoming border. In California, Pacific storms continue to bring precipitation in the form of high elevation snow and valley rains to the region. These moisture laden storms are crucial for summer water resources as the runoff feeds into the streams and reservoirs. Forecasted stream flows for California river basins generally show much above normal volumes through the summer months. No other changes were made in the West. *For details on Eastern Colorado and Eastern Wyoming, refer to the High Plains region. Looking Ahead During the next 5 days, temperatures are forecasted to be near to below average for the Northwest, High Plains and South. Warmer than average temperatures are expected in the Mid-Atlantic, Southeast and Southwest. During the same period, precipitation is forecasted to be the heaviest (3-5 inches) in an area stretching from Oklahoma east through the Tennessee Valley. Much of the Midwest and Northeast is also expected to see about an inch of precipitation. The 6-10 day outlooks call for an increase in probability that above normal temperatures are expected in the Southwest and South stretching into the Midwest and below normal temperatures in the Northwest, Northeast and parts of the High Plains. The odds are in favor of wet conditions in the Northwest, Northern Rockies and High Plains while the West and East Coasts dry out. Source: Agfax
Study Shows Despite Poor Economy, Interest in Ag Jobs Still Strong
AgCareers.com analyzes candidate and job posting trends in the agricultural industry for the annual Job Outlook Report. The newest edition is available now, with encouraging data. Despite the challenging agricultural economic climate, there were still nearly 60,000 jobs openings posted on AgCareers.com in 2016. Data also shows increased interest in agricultural careers, as AgCareers.com experienced more visits, page views and candidate applications in 2016. Job Trends On average, 5,000 North American jobs were posted on AgCareers.com each month in 2016; March and August were the peak months in the U.S. Looking at job postings by U.S. region, the largest number was posted in the Midwest region. Job listings on AgCareers.com are categorized by 25 different industry types and 42 career types. When we look across all U.S. regions, "Plant & Soil Sciences, Seed and Biotechnology" was the leading industry type, with more than 6,000 positions posted. "Crop Production" was a close second with nearly 6,000 positions. The "Farm & Ranch Operations/Herdsperson/On Farm" career type moved to the number one spot in the U.S. for 2016, followed by "Sales/Retail" careers. Candidate Trends There is increased interest among candidates to pursue careers in agriculture and use AgCareers.com in the job search process. Almost 9,000 new resumes were added to the AgCareers.com database in 2016. AgCareers.com processed more than 100,000 applications through the site in 2016, an increase of 15% from 2015. Forty-three percent of applicants had a bachelor's degree, while 12% had a college or associate's degree and 5% had a skilled trade or apprenticeship certificate. AgCareers.com asked applicants for their education discipline or major. The largest group had an ag-based degree (49%) while 36% had a non-ag degree. Nearly half of applicants were currently or most recently in an ag occupation, while just over 10% were students. Those in non-ag occupations were typically in roles with transferable skills applicable to agriculture, such as sales, customer service or skilled trades. More than half (55%) of applicants were young professionals with less than five years of experience. However, illustrating the diverse array of applicants with experience, 33% had 10-plus years of experience. Source: AgriMarketing
Things to Consider When Planting Soybeans Early
Early or timely planting has been shown to be an important management practice for increasing soybean yields. The optimum time to plant soybeans in most of Michigan is the first week of May. However, soybeans can be planted during the last week of April if soil and weather conditions are suitable. This practice extends the planting window, but is not expected to increase yields compared to beans planted during the first week of May. Yield losses ranging from 0.3 to 0.6 of a bushel per acre have been reported for each day planting is delayed after the first week of May. There are several reasons why early planting contributes to higher yields. Early planting typically produces more nodes on the main stem, increasing the potential for more pods and ultimately more seeds per plant. Early-planted soybeans also build a larger crop canopy before entering the reproductive period than later-planted soybeans. The larger canopy captures more of the available sunlight and reduces soil moisture losses due to evaporation by shading the soil surface. I want to emphasize that early planting is beneficial only when soil and weather conditions are suitable. During the last week of April and early May, soil temperatures should not be low enough to cause imbibitional chilling injury to the seed. However, the cool soils will delay germination and emergence. Imbibitional chilling injury occurs when very cold soil water is imbibed by the seed within the first 12 to 24 hours after planting. Producers can significantly reduce the risk of imbibitional chilling injury by implementing the following practices: Plant in the early afternoon to allow soils to warm up. Avoid planting when rain is imminent within 24 hours after planting. Plant later-maturing varieties as they are less susceptible to imbibitional chilling injury than early-maturing varieties. Plant high quality seed free of split seed coats or growth cracks. Avoid planting seed having low initial moisture levels. Soils are more likely to be too wet rather than too dry when planting early. Planting when the soil is too wet can easily negate the benefits of planting early and should be avoided if possible. Sidewall compaction and open seed furrows are the two most common conditions that result from planting when the soil is too wet. Dry weather following planting increases the adverse effects of both of these conditions. Due to the high probability that early-planted seed will be confronted with cool and wet soils, Michigan State University Extension recommends using fungicide seed treatments when planting early. Select fungicides that are effective against pythium, phytophthora and phomopsis. Early planting can be beneficial as long as producers wait for suitable soil conditions, use fungicide seed treatments, plant high quality seed from later-maturing varieties and avoid planting when rain is imminent within 24 hours. This article was produced by the SMaRT project (Soybean Management and Research Technology). The SMaRT project was developed to help Michigan producers increase soybean yields and farm profitability. The SMaRT project is a partnership between Michigan State University Extension and the Michigan Soybean Promotion Committee. Source: Michigan State University Extension
Too Early to Worry About Late Planting
Farmers have been a bit worried about getting into the field because of rains throughout the Midwest. It looks like those will clear out for the week, mostly, and even if they don’t, there isn’t much to worry about, yet. Todd Gleason has more on when the ag economist at the University of Illinois thinks late planting impacts the markets and yields. Farmers have been itching to go to the field. They want to plant corn in the Midwest. There’s also some rumblings about delayed planting. That’s a little hard to swallow in mid-April says Todd Hubbs. Todd Hubbs : We need a few more weeks before we start getting panicked about not getting a corn crop in. Hubbs is an agricultural economist at the University of Illinois. He’s looked at the stats and the historical record. He says it is pretty concise. Hubbs : If we have a huge amount of corn planted late, then we will see some acreage removed from the national portfolio. There is really no correlation or pattern with soybeans being planted late. There is for corn when you look at the national data on crop progress and planted acres. It’s a correlation that won’t happen for about a month if it happens at all. Hubbs : May 20th for corn is late. You do see some yield hits as you move along. Emerson Nafziger has a really nice post from last year for Illinois in particular about corn and soybean yields and planting dates. So, May 20th for corn and around May 30th for soybeans and I don’t think we are in any danger right now. You can check out Emerson Nafziger’s planting date post on the web. Just search google for bulletin and University of Illinois. Source: Morning Ag Clips
Nebraska Ag Update - April 21, 2017
Nebraska Ag Updates
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Urban Youth to Experience Life on the Farm
LINCOLN - As spring planting season gets underway, the Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) wants to remind farmers and other outdoor pesticide applicators to work together to protect sensitive specialty crops and pollinators from pesticide use. Pesticides include all categories of pest control products such as herbicides, insecticides and fungicides.
National
Canada trade dispute puts some Minnesota dairy farmers on the brink
The executive director of the Minnesota Milk Producers Association says an extreme supply and demand situation has put at least eight Minnesota dairy farmers on the brink of going out of business. Lucas Sjostrum?tells Brownfield ultra-filtered milk duties recently imposed by Canada have left dozens of U.S. producers scrambling to find other destinations for their milk. “Had this happened any other time, these farmers probably would have found another market immediately and continued on.? Continue reading Canada trade dispute puts some Minnesota dairy farmers on the brink at Brownfield Ag News.      
Indiana General Assembly passes historic road funding legislation
The Indiana state legislature has passed historic road funding legislation and the state?s largest farm organization is pleased with the results. Justin Schneider, director of state government relations for the Indiana Farm Bureau says the goal for this legislative session was long-term sustainable road funding.? ?There?s definitely a lot fo new money ? more than $300 million over the next 7 years going to local government for local roads and bridges,? he says.? Continue reading Indiana General Assembly passes historic road funding legislation at Brownfield Ag News.      
Midday cash livestock markets
Business in cattle country on Monday is limited to the collection of the new showlists. Bids and asking prices are not well-defined at this point in time. The cost of live cattle is accelerating at a faster rate than the beef carcass value. Gross packer margins will start out the week around $153.00, the smallest since late march. Further narrowing may necessitate the slowing of chain speed, according to DTN. Boxed beef cutout values are mixed, choice 217.87, up .71, and select 203.12, down .17. Continue reading Midday cash livestock markets at Brownfield Ag News.      
Good week for corn, soybean export inspections
The USDA reports that as of the week ending April 20th, 2017, corn and soybean inspections remain ahead of what’s needed to meet USDA projections for the 2016/17 marketing year. Wheat came out at 612,536 tons, down 72,778 from the week ending April 13th, but up 178,558 from the week ending April 21st, 2016. With less than a month and a half left in the 2016/17 marketing year, wheat inspections are 23,791,641 tons, compared to 18,048,010 late in 2015/16. Continue reading Good week for corn, soybean export inspections at Brownfield Ag News.      
Perdue confirmation among highlights of a busy week in DC
The Senate is scheduled to vote later today on the confirmation of former Georgia Governor Sonny Perdue as the next agriculture secretary.? Debate is set to begin at 3pm with a vote scheduled for 5:30 and Perdue?s nomination is expected to be easily confirmed.? Perdue is expected to be sworn in on Tuesday. Also on Tuesday the President will host a roundtable discussion with farmers and sign the ?Executive Order Promoting Agriculture and Rural Prosperity in America?.? Continue reading Perdue confirmation among highlights of a busy week in DC at Brownfield Ag News.      
Active, moisture-laden weather ahead
A Southeastern storm will remain the focus for heavy rain as it drifts along the Atlantic Seaboard through mid-week. Additional rainfall could reach 2 to 6 inches in parts of Virginia and the Carolinas. Rainfall will be lighter in surrounding areas, including Florida. Meanwhile, dry weather will prevail through week?s end from southern California to the Mississippi Valley, and from the Midwest into the Northeast. In contrast, 5-day amounts of 2 to 5 inches can be expected in the Pacific Northwest, with 1- to 4-inch totals possible in the northern and central Rockies. Continue reading Active, moisture-laden weather ahead at Brownfield Ag News.      
For now, short-term fieldwork opportunities
On the Plains, unusually cold weather prevails across the northern tier of the region, accompanied by a few rain and snow showers. In contrast, warm, dry weather on the central and southern Plains is promoting winter wheat development and summer crop planting and emergence. Across the Corn Belt, warm, dry weather favors a limited return to corn planting and other spring fieldwork, as conditions permit. Some of the best opportunities for fieldwork are occurring in the southern Corn Belt, which has received only light rain in recent days. Continue reading For now, short-term fieldwork opportunities at Brownfield Ag News.      
Columbia, Missouri FFA judging team among convention winners
The Columbia FFA Chapter won the Missouri FFA Livestock Judging competition among the 59 teams competing.? Team member Aaron Mott, also chosen during the convention to be 2017-2018 Missouri FFA Vice President from Columbia, tells Brownfield having to defend and explain placings of cattle, sheep and swine sharpens a young individual. ?Honestly, I think I have livestock judging to thank as a big part of me being able to come out and speak in front of people; [having to give] reasons is definitely a nerve-racking experience where you have to remember what you said, you need to keep your composure and maintain eye contact,? Mott told Brownfield Ag News Friday, after learning that his team had won the judging competition.? Continue reading Columbia, Missouri FFA judging team among convention winners at Brownfield Ag News.      
For cattle minerals, one size does not fit all
A cow-calf specialist says mineral supplements need to be customized for cattle.? Adele Harty with South Dakota State University tells Brownfield Ag News many cattle producers want to improve their mineral programs.? The motivation is because of special circumstances in South Dakota and other areas.? Harty says the lack of a specific mineral, or certain mineral interactions, might prevent pregnancies in cattle, or might cause early abortions.? But no matter where a cattle operation is located, Harty says it?s important for each cattle producer to evaluate which minerals are needed in a ration.? Continue reading For cattle minerals, one size does not fit all at Brownfield Ag News.      
Milk processors still needed for 40 Wisconsin dairies
  Wisconsin?s Ag Secretary says not all of the dairy producers being cut from Grassland Dairy in Greenwood (Wisconsin) at the end of the month are in Wisconsin. Ben Brancel says, ?Just recently it was clarified to us that some of the letters went to Minnesota and some of the letters went to the State of Wisconsin, and the number of letters in Wisconsin was 58.? Brownfield learned from the Minnesota Milk Producers that?s 19 Minnesota producers, bringing the total of affected dairy farms to 77.? Continue reading Milk processors still needed for 40 Wisconsin dairies at Brownfield Ag News.      
Soybeans up on new export sale
Soybeans were modestly higher on commercial and technical buying. Unknown destinations bought 146,000 tons of old crop U.S. beans, the first announced sale of that size in about a month. Export demand has definitely taken a hit from record South American production. The Buenos Aires Grain Exchange says 16.3% of Argentina?s soybean crop is harvested. Soybean meal was higher, following beans, and oil was mostly firm, consolidating. According to Statistics Canada, a survey of farmers indicates canola planting in Canada could be a new record, with the projection at 22.387 million acres, and soybeans could also hit a new time high with an estimate of 6.956 million acres. Continue reading Soybeans up on new export sale at Brownfield Ag News.      
New building technologies help protect birds against disease
New technologies are helping poultry producers protect their flocks against high path avian flu. Tony Wesner, with Indiana-based Rose Acre Farms says the innovations used in the company?s new cage-free houses helps them better control the environment.? ?Because the system is so well insulated and so well put together and so tight,? he says.? ?We?re able to maximize our air movement.? Maximize our air efficiency. And eliminate outside exposure as much as we possibly can.? He tells Brownfield the new design helps to keep diseases out ? but ultimately it?s back to basics of biosecurity to prevent another outbreak of avian flu. Continue reading New building technologies help protect birds against disease at Brownfield Ag News.      
MCGA supports cover crop experimentation through Innovation Grants
A south central Minnesota farmer is entering his second year experimenting with cover crops through financial support provided by the Minnesota Corn Growers Association (MCGA). Dan Coffman of Nicollet says he took advantage of Innovation Grant dollars and had a lot of success growing cover crops in the first of a three year project. “We wanted to incorporate cover crops into standing corn.? Doing some research, I figured the best way to do that would be to inter-seed a cover crop around V4 to V7 into the corn.” Coffman seeded a blend of rye, triticale, turnip, radish and rapeseed, using a homemade inter-seeding machine built out of a cultivator. Continue reading MCGA supports cover crop experimentation through Innovation Grants at Brownfield Ag News.      
General Mills says sustainability goals ?imperative?
General Mills says its sustainability goals ? launched four years ago – started as a ?business imperative? for the 150-year-old food company. Jerry Lynch, vice president and sustainability chief, tells Brownfield progress is being made with their suppliers and farmers. He says General Mills? continuous improvement measurement is applied to large commodity crops in North America which are ingredients in many of their food products, ?Things like wheat and oats and corn and sugar beets.? Suppliers work directly with farmers of those crops using the Field to Market calculator by the Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture. Continue reading General Mills says sustainability goals “imperative” at Brownfield Ag News.      
Pruitt says EPA overreach and ?war on fossil fuels? are over
EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt says the days of EPA overreach are over. That was one of his messages Thursday during a visit to rural Missouri, ?It was very important, I think, to send a message to folks here in Missouri, as we did last week in Pennsylvania that the days of the EPA using regulations to pick winners and losers, to declare a war on any sector of our economy like fossil fuels and coal, is over. Continue reading Pruitt says EPA overreach and “war on fossil fuels” are over at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Lending Down for Q1 of 2017, Adjustments to Financing
The farm economy is continuing to feel the pressure of lower commodity prices and a tepid outlook for 2017. 
Coal-Heavy Energy Plan Under Fire
For all Donald Trump’s efforts to revive coal, market forces and some of his own supporters are vying to write their own version of America’s energy future.
Syngenta Defends GMO Corn as Merger Shifts Blame to China's Door
Syngenta merger means Chinese may own seeds they rejected.
Syngenta 1st-Qtr Sales Dip on Pricing, Cold Weather
Syngenta reported its first-quarter group sales of $3.7 billion were 1% lower from a year ago, hurt by lower pricing, a cold weather in Northern and Central Europe, and reduced demand for fungicides and herbicides in Brazil and Paraguay. Volumes were stable, while the more favorable currency trend which began in the second half of 2016 continued, with the Russian Ruble and the Brazilian Real strengthening against the dollar. Erik Fyrwald, Chief Executive Officer, said: ?While conditions for growers at the start of 2017 remain difficult, our business is steady and currencies are no longer a drag on our performance. For the full year we maintain our targets of low single digit growth in sales, an improvement in the EBITDA margin and strong free cash flow generation. In recent weeks the ChemChina transaction has made very significant progress, with the receipt of regulatory approvals including the European Union and the USA. We look forward to closing the transaction in May 2017.? Sales in Europe, Africa and the Middle East were unchanged despite a late start to the season in Northern and Central Europe, due to cold weather. This was offset by an excellent performance in South East Europe and ongoing growth in the CIS, as well as by solid growth in France due to the highly successful launch of ELATUS PLUS at the end of 2016. In North America, a decline in Seeds sales was largely due to a timing difference in the receipt of trait royalties. Crop Protection sales showed robust growth driven by the ongoing success of TRIVAPRO, based on SOLATENOL. In Latin America, sales were 3% lower. Dry weather in the second half of 2016, affecting the south of Brazil and Paraguay, reduced demand for fungicides and herbicides. In Asia Pacific sales were up 4%. The main driver was ASEAN, with a continuing good corn seed performance. China grew based on the adoption of fungicides, notably AMISTAR?. Sales of selective herbicides were primarily impacted by the late start to the season in Europe. In the USA, ACURON? and DUAL GOLD? continued to expand despite competitive market conditions. Sales of non-selective herbicides were also lower due to softness in glyphosate. Growth in fungicides was driven by SOLATENOL? based products in France, Germany and USA. This more than offset the impact of market weakness in Latin America. Insecticides sales were down due to lower sales in Northern Europe. Seedcare sales were slightly higher, with good performances by CRUISER? and FORTENZA? in Latin America. Corn seed sales grew strongly in both Latin America and Asia Pacific. In North America corn sales were down due to trait royalty timing. Soybean sales were also slightly lower. Diverse field crops registered double digit growth driven primarily by sunflowers. Vegetables recorded growth in Europe and Latin America.  
Morning Market Audio 4/24/17
Protecting Your Equipment, Inside and Out
Regular maintenance is key to keeping your equipment running smoothly. A fast and easy step you can take yourself is to perform a monthly oil analysis.​
US Export Door Opens With Weak Dollar
Grain markets are higher, supported by a weaker US Dollar and last week?s sell-off of 14 cents in corn and 24 cents in wheat. French election results adds confidence to EU economy...
Why Diagnostics Can Be Expensive
Sometimes "fixing" a problem is cheaper than diagnosing it.
Market Highlights: Cattle Prices and Feedlot Placements Climb
Fed cattle continue to trade higher as feedlot placements increase.
1984 Model Tractors
Machinery Pete gets to thinking about 1984, the year he graduated high school, and looks at the highest recent auction sale prices on 1984 model tractors​
Vomitoxin Makes Nasty Appearance for U.S. Farm Sector
A fungus that causes “vomitoxin” has been found in some U.S. corn harvested last year, forcing poultry and pork farmers to test their grain, and giving headaches to grain growers already wrestling with massive supplies and low prices.
Gulke: Market Screams For Soybeans
A new report shows Canada will plant 27% more soybeans in 2017 than a year ago, says Jerry Gulke, president of the Gulke Group.
Pesticides on the Defense
EPA reviews put popular chemicals under the magnifying glass