Ashburn VA

Monday
Partly Cloudy
90°F / 67°F
Wind: 7 N
Average Humidity: 50
The Next Three Days

Tuesday
Clear
89°F / 66°F
Wind: 5 NNE
Humidity: 55

Wednesday
Clear
91°F / 69°F
Wind: 6 SSW
Humidity: 61

Thursday
Chance of a Thunderstorm
84°F / 62°F
Wind: 9 NNW
Humidity: 68
Close
@C - CORN - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Sep '16 318'6 311'4 312'0 -4'2
Dec '16 327'2 320'2 320'2 -4'6
Mar '17 336'6 330'2 330'4 -4'0
May '17 343'6 337'6 338'0 -3'6
Jul '17 351'0 345'0 345'2 -3'6
Sep '17 357'0 352'4 353'0 -3'2
@S - SOYBEANS - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Sep '16 998'2 981'4 981'6 -9'0
Nov '16 974'0 961'2 963'2 -4'0
Jan '17 976'0 964'2 965'4 -4'2
Mar '17 976'6 965'0 966'6 -3'6
May '17 978'0 966'6 968'4 -3'4
Jul '17 978'2 968'4 971'0 -2'6
Aug '17 973'0 966'4 966'4 -2'6
@K - HARD RED WINTER WHEAT - KCBT
Month High Low Last Chg
Sep '16 390'0 374'4 375'2 -14'4
Dec '16 416'6 402'2 403'0 -13'6
Mar '17 432'6 418'6 419'2 -13'4
May '17 443'2 429'4 430'6 -12'4
@L - LIVE CATTLE - CME
Month High Low Last Chg
Aug '16 110.850 109.800 110.700 0.350
Oct '16 106.425 105.000 105.200 -1.150
@C - COTTON #2 - ICEFU
Month High Low Last Chg
Oct '16 67.09 66.46 67.02 -0.69
Dec '16 68.14 66.60 67.05 -0.98
Mar '17 68.43 67.10 67.53 -0.83
DTN Click here for info on Exchange delays.
Local
Check Corn Now for Western Bean Cutworm Damage Before Harvest
A lot of western bean cutworm damage is being found in central and southern Michigan, in both non-Bt and Bt corn (including Cry1F). I would appreciate any observations on percent infested ears by hybrid, especially feedback on Bt hybrids with the Cry 1F Bt trait (email me at difonzo@msu.edu). Cry1F is in Herculex 1 and Xtra; most Acremax (AM), Intrasect and TRIsect packages; in Smartstax; and Agrisure E-Z Refuge products (3122, 3220, 5122, 5222). Caterpillars will be tucked in the ear tip or between the ear and stalk; they may not be obvious at first glance unless you peel back the husk. To quote a caller from yesterday, Aug. 25, 2016, “When you walk into the field, it looks OK.” Recall that western bean cutworms were a concern in 2008-2011 in corn and dry beans when it was colonizing the Great Lakes region from the western states. In the 2012 drought, the population tanked and biocontrol picked up for the next few years. However in 2015, numbers started to increase again. This year, flights were fairly heavy in central Michigan (a known hot spot), but also in southern counties. Damage is being reported most often in fields in areas with sandy soil, which likely increases overwintering success. Entomologists in neighboring states are reporting damage too. Up-and-down population cycles are typical of many agriculture pests. Some people in southern Michigan may be dealing with western bean cutworms for the first time, so let’s recap a few important points. Western bean cutworms overwinter here in Michigan (i.e., we grow our own), and seem to do especially well in areas with sandy soil. My lab found larvae overwintering as deep as 12 to 16 inches in sandy soil. Hot spots in previous years were counties along Lake Michigan, in southwest Michigan along the Indiana border, in central Michigan in Montcalm, Gratiot and Isabella counties, and in the Upper Peninsula, all areas with sandy soil. Western bean cutworm females are attracted to pre-tassel corn for egglaying. Fields that are infested now were at that perfect stage back in late-July or early August. Larval management (a pyrethroid spray) needs to happen during and just after egg-hatch. Scouting for egg masses is relatively easy if you know what to look for. In Michigan, I recommend a lower threshold (5 percent plants infested) compared to western states. Once small larvae move down the plant and inside the husk, spraying is neither recommended nor effective. On all the pyrethroid labels under corn is this statement about western bean cutworms: “For control before the larva bores into the ear.” And late August is far too late since western bean cutworms are starting to drop to the ground to overwinter. The damage is mostly done. Larvae usually feed in the ear tip. If the tip isn’t completely filled, yield loss can be minimal. Larvae sometimes bore into the side where the ear presses against the stalk. Again, the number of kernels eaten may only be a few. But yield loss doesn’t tell the whole story. Often, the more important impact from the feeding is the husk damage and opening of the ear. As western bean cutworms feed, they chew tissue and spew out messy frass. The open husk lets in secondary insects like sap beetles, which do the same. The result is a moist, wounded area for pathogen growth. Depending on environmental conditions, mycotoxins can then contaminate damaged grain at harvest. Note it is too late – in time and plant stage – to spray fungicides in an attempt to prevent or “clean up” ear infections. Reduction of ear molds and mycotoxins must begin much earlier, by scouting and spraying for western bean cutworms at the optimal timing to avoid ear damage altogether. The Bts that kill European corn borer do not give 100 percent control of western bean cutworms. Cry1Ab (Yieldgard) and Cry1A.105 plus Cry2Ab2 (Double Pro) are not effective. Cry1F is listed as giving western bean cutworm control, but it is having a tough time this year – many Cry1F hybrids are being chewed on, especially in southern Michigan. It is my opinion that it only provides suppression; bigger larvae are able to eat up ear tips regardless of the Cry1F. Vip3A (in some Agrisure hybrids and AcreMax Leptra), a Bt optimized for secondary caterpillars, should be effective against western bean cutworms. This information is from a trial my lab did in 2010 during the western bean cutworm outbreak in Montcalm County. Cry1F hybrids had less damage and ear mold, but control of western bean cutworm was not 100 percent. (Note that these hybrids were not genetically equivalent, so yield loss is difficult to attribute all to western bean cutworm.) The complete report with pictures is at “Western Bean Cutworm in Michigan: Update on corn research from 2010,” by Michigan State University’s Chris DiFonzo and Megan Chludzinski, and MSU Extension’s Fred Springborn. If you have a field that is heavily infested (beyond what you’d expect from the 5 percent refuge): Consider reporting highly infested Cry1F fields to your seed dealer so that the companies can get an idea of the scope of the problem. For sure report a Vip3A field that appears to have unexpected high damage from western bean cutworms, as this would be of great concern. If you have an option of harvesting an infested field as silage, that will avoid drying costs and further quality loss. Run the grain from infested fields over a screen before it goes into a bin to get out as many damaged kernels as possible. Dry the grain down as soon as possible to prevent pathogen growth and mycotoxin development. Never store bad grain over good, or add it to a bin with good grain. Better yet, don’t store western bean cutworm damaged grain at all, if possible. Source: Michigan State University Extension
National
Michigan Breakfast on the Farms draw 77K
Breakfast on the Farm events have brought in more than 77,000 visitors to Michigan farms. The educational farm tours, coordinated by Michigan State University Extension, were started in 2009 to open farms up to consumers and provide an opportunity to learn about modern production practices. Sixth-generation dairy farmer Brad Hart of Hartland Dairy will be the 35th host farm this weekend in southeast Michigan.? He tells Brownfield after volunteering with several past events, he continues to be amazed with the responses of visitors.? He says they?ve been overwhelmed by the amount of people who want to be involved and have started turning away volunteers. Hart says the family farm was settled in Lenawee County in 1836 and today milks 1,000 cows. He says the event gives consumers the chance to see how their food is produced and how farmers care for their animals. AUDIO: Interview with Brad Hart http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/160823_BOTF-Hart.mp3 The post Michigan Breakfast on the Farms draw 77K appeared first on Brownfield Ag News.      
Facebook
Fall Sale!
Fall Sale!>
Check out our PRE-HARVEST SAVINGS at your Aurora Service Centers. ...
Check out our PRE-HARVEST SAVINGS at your Aurora Service Centers. Aurora Cooperative - Putting Your Equity to Work! http://ow.ly/d/57FD>
Interesting article on commodity prices and how some think they are ...
Interesting article on commodity prices and how some think they are valued vs. the current expected yield. https://www.morningagclips.com/what-yield-is-the-market-trading/>
Looking at your fields from a new perspective! At Aurora we are ...
Looking at your fields from a new perspective! At Aurora we are striving to find new/innovative ways to help you exceed your field production goals. Our Real Farm Research Trials are one way we can bring that message to you.. If you haven?t attended one of our events yet please stop in at our website or visit us on Facebook to see what events are remaining near you.>
See what farmers are saying, from across the country, about their ...
See what farmers are saying, from across the country, about their corn and soy crop conditions.>
It was our honor to have Nebraska FFA State Officers visit today!
It was our honor to have Nebraska FFA State Officers visit today!>
Aurora cooperative agronomic alert: Southern Rust has been confirmed ...
Aurora cooperative agronomic alert: Southern Rust has been confirmed in York, Hall and Adams counties in Nebraska. Aurora agronomist Gabe Bathem and Calvin Rupe were out diagnosing customers fields and turned in leaf samples to the university plant diagnostic center where they came back positive for southern rust. This disease has progressed aggressively over the past 14 days and stay on the lookout for this damaging disease. If you need a representative to take a look at your fields give your local Aurora cooperative sales agronomist a call. http://ow.ly/B8sv302Yun6>
Southern Rust, Grey leaf and other damaging diseases are rapidly ...
Southern Rust, Grey leaf and other damaging diseases are rapidly spreading throughout the state and can greatly reduce your crops productivity. Let your local Aurora cooperative agronomist know if we need to take a look at your field, to ensure we keep your crop running at optimal efficiency. http://ow.ly/UVKl302OuOh>
Sizzling End of Summer Sales promotions. Stop by the Aurora service ...
Sizzling End of Summer Sales promotions. Stop by the Aurora service center or visit us online at Auroracoop.com to check out our summer sales promotion.>
Field Report: Great day to be with customers learning about how we ...
Field Report: Great day to be with customers learning about how we keep our crops running/producing at maximum capacity. Check out what we are doing at Real Farm Research.>
Southern Rust confirmed in South Central Nebraska! ...
Southern Rust confirmed in South Central Nebraska! http://ow.ly/hJGD302EWGP>
?Is your Plant Engine Running at Maximum Efficiency?? At Aurora ...
?Is your Plant Engine Running at Maximum Efficiency?? At Aurora Cooperative, our Real Farm Research Team is gaining new insights every day on how to make every plant / field run efficiently to maximize your return on investment. To learn more come check us out at one of our RFR sites tours. Ashton/Dannebrog 7/27/2016 Doniphan, NE 7/28/2016 Minden, NE 8/2/2016 Fairbury, NE 8/3/2016 Traer, IA 8/25/2016 York, NE 8/9/2016 Byron, NE 8/10/2016 Aurora, NE 8/11/2016 Wray, CO 8/16/2016 Grant, NE 8/17/2016 Grand Island 8/18/2016>
Starting to think about your fall needs? We are! Come talk to us on ...
Starting to think about your fall needs? We are! Come talk to us on how you can take advantage of a special promotion to help you keep everything running smoothly this fall.>
Aurora Cooperative at the Perkins Co Fair parade!
Aurora Cooperative at the Perkins Co Fair parade!>
The Aurora Cooperative is in the middle of our whirlwind county fair ...
The Aurora Cooperative is in the middle of our whirlwind county fair tour! We have made it to Thayer, Adams, Clay, Fillmore, Jefferson, Webster, Hall, Jewell Co Kansas, Clay, Nuckolls and Franklin Counties!! It has been great to meet so many hard working kids in 4H and FFA!>
Local
Check Corn Now for Western Bean Cutworm Damage Before Harvest
A lot of western bean cutworm damage is being found in central and southern Michigan, in both non-Bt and Bt corn (including Cry1F). I would appreciate any observations on percent infested ears by hybrid, especially feedback on Bt hybrids with the Cry 1F Bt trait (email me at difonzo@msu.edu). Cry1F is in Herculex 1 and Xtra; most Acremax (AM), Intrasect and TRIsect packages; in Smartstax; and Agrisure E-Z Refuge products (3122, 3220, 5122, 5222). Caterpillars will be tucked in the ear tip or between the ear and stalk; they may not be obvious at first glance unless you peel back the husk. To quote a caller from yesterday, Aug. 25, 2016, “When you walk into the field, it looks OK.” Recall that western bean cutworms were a concern in 2008-2011 in corn and dry beans when it was colonizing the Great Lakes region from the western states. In the 2012 drought, the population tanked and biocontrol picked up for the next few years. However in 2015, numbers started to increase again. This year, flights were fairly heavy in central Michigan (a known hot spot), but also in southern counties. Damage is being reported most often in fields in areas with sandy soil, which likely increases overwintering success. Entomologists in neighboring states are reporting damage too. Up-and-down population cycles are typical of many agriculture pests. Some people in southern Michigan may be dealing with western bean cutworms for the first time, so let’s recap a few important points. Western bean cutworms overwinter here in Michigan (i.e., we grow our own), and seem to do especially well in areas with sandy soil. My lab found larvae overwintering as deep as 12 to 16 inches in sandy soil. Hot spots in previous years were counties along Lake Michigan, in southwest Michigan along the Indiana border, in central Michigan in Montcalm, Gratiot and Isabella counties, and in the Upper Peninsula, all areas with sandy soil. Western bean cutworm females are attracted to pre-tassel corn for egglaying. Fields that are infested now were at that perfect stage back in late-July or early August. Larval management (a pyrethroid spray) needs to happen during and just after egg-hatch. Scouting for egg masses is relatively easy if you know what to look for. In Michigan, I recommend a lower threshold (5 percent plants infested) compared to western states. Once small larvae move down the plant and inside the husk, spraying is neither recommended nor effective. On all the pyrethroid labels under corn is this statement about western bean cutworms: “For control before the larva bores into the ear.” And late August is far too late since western bean cutworms are starting to drop to the ground to overwinter. The damage is mostly done. Larvae usually feed in the ear tip. If the tip isn’t completely filled, yield loss can be minimal. Larvae sometimes bore into the side where the ear presses against the stalk. Again, the number of kernels eaten may only be a few. But yield loss doesn’t tell the whole story. Often, the more important impact from the feeding is the husk damage and opening of the ear. As western bean cutworms feed, they chew tissue and spew out messy frass. The open husk lets in secondary insects like sap beetles, which do the same. The result is a moist, wounded area for pathogen growth. Depending on environmental conditions, mycotoxins can then contaminate damaged grain at harvest. Note it is too late – in time and plant stage – to spray fungicides in an attempt to prevent or “clean up” ear infections. Reduction of ear molds and mycotoxins must begin much earlier, by scouting and spraying for western bean cutworms at the optimal timing to avoid ear damage altogether. The Bts that kill European corn borer do not give 100 percent control of western bean cutworms. Cry1Ab (Yieldgard) and Cry1A.105 plus Cry2Ab2 (Double Pro) are not effective. Cry1F is listed as giving western bean cutworm control, but it is having a tough time this year – many Cry1F hybrids are being chewed on, especially in southern Michigan. It is my opinion that it only provides suppression; bigger larvae are able to eat up ear tips regardless of the Cry1F. Vip3A (in some Agrisure hybrids and AcreMax Leptra), a Bt optimized for secondary caterpillars, should be effective against western bean cutworms. This information is from a trial my lab did in 2010 during the western bean cutworm outbreak in Montcalm County. Cry1F hybrids had less damage and ear mold, but control of western bean cutworm was not 100 percent. (Note that these hybrids were not genetically equivalent, so yield loss is difficult to attribute all to western bean cutworm.) The complete report with pictures is at “Western Bean Cutworm in Michigan: Update on corn research from 2010,” by Michigan State University’s Chris DiFonzo and Megan Chludzinski, and MSU Extension’s Fred Springborn. If you have a field that is heavily infested (beyond what you’d expect from the 5 percent refuge): Consider reporting highly infested Cry1F fields to your seed dealer so that the companies can get an idea of the scope of the problem. For sure report a Vip3A field that appears to have unexpected high damage from western bean cutworms, as this would be of great concern. If you have an option of harvesting an infested field as silage, that will avoid drying costs and further quality loss. Run the grain from infested fields over a screen before it goes into a bin to get out as many damaged kernels as possible. Dry the grain down as soon as possible to prevent pathogen growth and mycotoxin development. Never store bad grain over good, or add it to a bin with good grain. Better yet, don’t store western bean cutworm damaged grain at all, if possible. Source: Michigan State University Extension
Fall Armyworms Are on the March
Fall armyworms are on the march in parts of Texas. Fall armyworm numbers are increasing around the state following recent rain events and a drop in temperatures. Armyworms can devastate rangeland and pastures quickly. (Texas A&M AgriLife Extension photo by Adam Russell) Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agents in a few of the agency’s districts have reported increased armyworm activity in hayfields and pastures over the past few weeks. Dr. Vanessa Corriher-Olson, AgriLife Extension forage specialist in Overton, said producers should expect an increase in armyworm numbers following recent rains and cooler temperatures in areas of the state. “I was getting calls about them before the rain,” she said. “They like cooler temperatures and wet conditions in the spring and fall, so we could see a swell in their numbers.” Armyworm moths can lay up to 2,000 eggs that hatch in two to three days, according to a 2015 report by AgriLife Extension entomologist Dr. Allen Knutson. There are four to five generations per year. Corriher-Olson said armyworm caterpillars are picky eaters that prefer high–quality, fertilized forage typically found on fields maintained for hay production. They are a common pest of Bermudagrass, sorghum, corn, wheat, rye grass and many other crops in north and central Texas. Producers should scout each morning for armyworms, she said. Armyworms are night feeders that try to avoid daytime temperatures. Armyworms are green, brown or black in color and can be identified by the white inverted Y on their head. They can grow up to 1 inch in length when mature. The pest got its name because they appear to march across hay fields, consuming the grass in their path. The threshold for insecticide spray treating a pasture is three or more armyworms per square foot, Corriher-Olson said. Armyworms in those numbers should be treated immediately. Armyworms in the last two or three days of their larvae stage consume 85 percent of their diet. Corriher-Olson recommends insecticides labeled for armyworm control in pastures and hayfields. She said applicators should always follow all label instructions on pesticide use and restrictions. “You don’t need to wait a day if their numbers are at threshold,” she said. “They are going to do a lot of damage quickly. If you find them in the morning, spray that day.” More information about armyworms can be found in Knutson’s report The Fall Armyworm – Pest of Pastures and Hay. Source: Texas AgriLife Extension
Chinese Zika Rules Threaten U.S. Farm Exports
Chinese regulations aimed at stopping the Zika virus from entering its borders threaten to impede U.S. agricultural exports. The U.S. was recently added to a list of countries covered by Chinese rules that require shipping containers to be quarantined and treated for mosquitoes, which transmit the birth defect-causing virus. “It is going to be burdensome. It’s going to add a lot of cost and burden to U.S. exports,” said Abigail Struxness, program manager of the Agriculture Transportation Coalition. Last year, total U.S. agricultural exports to China topped $20 billion. At this point, it appears that Chinese customs officials are offering to fumigate incoming containers for a fee, or accept certificates stating that containers were fumigated prior to shipping, Struxness said. It’s unclear whether the regulations will apply to refrigerated cargo, which often travels at temperatures low enough to kill the insects, she said. Agricultural exporters are also unsure which fumigation methods are required by the Chinese, or which U.S. agency is responsible for the certification, she said. The Agriculture Transportation Coalition is still trying to assess the added costs and delays resulting from the rules, as well as how they will impact U.S. competitiveness, Struxness said. Agricultural shippers are concerned about how fumigation will affect food-grade commodities and organic crops, she said. “That’s another thing we need to figure out.” According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the only state to experience locally transmitted cases of Zika through mosquitoes is Florida. Locally transmitted cases of Zika have also occurred in the U.S. territories of Puerto Rico, American Samoa and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has issued a notice stating agency officials are discussing the regulations and acceptable documentation with their counterparts in China. The notice states that Zika is a human health issue, not a phytosanitary problem, which means APHIS officials cannot validate mosquito treatments on phytosanitary certificates. USDA’s position is troubling for John Szczepanski, director of the U.S. Forage Export Council, because it will likely delay a comprehensive U.S. response to the Chinese Zika regulations. “The people who could help us are saying mosquitoes aren’t under their jurisdiction,” he said. The notice put out by APHIS would indicate that USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service is the appropriate agency to deal with the problem — except that it doesn’t employ any entomologists, Szczepanski said. “It adds to the frustration of agricultural exporters.” China is an export market for alfalfa grown in Oregon, Washington, Idaho and California, he said. The risk is that without uniformity, agricultural exporters will come up with their own individual treatment methods and certifications, adding to the confusion, he said. “Exporters want to do the right thing, but they don’t know exactly what to do.” Source: Capital Press
Wheat Futures Prices Fall to 10-Year Low
Wheat futures traded in Chicago dropped to their lowest prices in nearly a decade on Friday, pressured by ample supplies. Corn and soybeans also dipped, ahead of national production estimates due after the close from the Pro Farmer crop tour. The Chicago Board of Trade most-active December wheat dropped 15 cents, or 3.5 per cent, to $4.08 3/4 a bushel at 11:07 a.m. CDT (1607 GMT). The September contract dipped as low as $3.85 1/4 a bushel, the lowest nearby price since 2006. Technical selling and grain handlers' efforts to move U.S. winter wheat supplies to buyers ahead of the corn harvest pressured wheat prices, said Roy Huckabay, executive vice-president of Linn & Associates, a Chicago brokerage. Wheat was on track for its biggest weekly decline in two years. Global supplies are abundant as well. The International Grains Council on Thursday raised its forecast for world wheat production in the 2016-17 season to a record high. Traders are keeping an eye on an import tender from Egypt, the world's top importer. Egypt's General Authority for Supply Commodities set a tender on Thursday to buy wheat for shipment from Sept. 26 to Oct. 5. December corn shed 5 1/4 cents, or 1.6 per cent, to $3.26 3/4 a bushel, putting it on course for its biggest weekly decline since late June. November soybeans shed 11 cents, or 1.1 per cent, to $9.64-1/2 a bushel, headed for their largest weekly loss in five weeks. "We are going to see a reasonably big corn crop in the U.S. and what is looking like as big a wheat crop," said Brett Cooper, senior manager for markets at FCStone Australia. "A big soybean crop will put pressure on prices but nothing has changed the demand story. Demand has been strong and it is hard to see demand dropping off as prices fall," he added. Results were mixed on Thursday, the final day of the closely watched Pro Farmer crop tour across the U.S. Midwest. Corn yields and soy pod counts were higher than last year in Iowa, but lower in Minnesota, scouts found. Source: AgriMarketing
New Corn Disease Identified in Illinois
One positive sample of bacterial leaf streak was found in a corn field in DeKalb County, Illinois, its identification verified yesterday by the USDA. With this presence in Illinois, bacterial leaf streak has been identified in 9 states: Colorado, Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and Texas. DeKalb is the only county in Illinois that has been verified to have the disease. “Because this is a bacterial disease, fungicides cannot be expected to control or suppress it,” says Suzanne Bissonnette, University of Illinois plant clinic director and assistant dean for agriculture and natural resources with U of I Extension. U of I Extension commercial agriculture educator Dennis Bowman adds, “Crop rotation and tillage are the best short-term management strategies if the disease is present in a field.” Bissonnette says if growers suspect bacterial leaf streak in their field, they can submit a sample to the U of I Plant Clinic. “We’d like to get a comprehensive idea of distribution in the state,” Bissonnette says. “Although there are currently no known methods to prevent it, differences in varietal susceptibility may point the way to sources of resistance.” Bacterial leaf streak is caused by the pathogen Xanthomonas vasicola pv. vasculorum. The disease causes the formation of linear lesions between the veins on a corn leaf. The lesions look similar to gray leaf spot symptoms – although GLS lesions tend to be shorter, more rectangular, and to stay within their veinal borders. “Bacterial leaf streak lesions are more irregular, often thinner and longer, will ‘bleed’ over the veinal border, and may have a halo when held up to the light,” Bowman explains. In many Great Plains states where the disease has been found, symptoms first appear on the lower leaves and infection progresses up the plant. Typically these fields have been under pivot irrigation. Later infections may occur and show up primarily in the upper canopy. This was the case for the positive DeKalb County sample found in the survey of approximately 340 randomly selected fields in transects across 68 of Illinois’s 102 counties. The survey was conducted by APHIS-PPQ (Animal Plant Health Inspection Service), IDA (Illinois Department of Agriculture), CAPS (Illinois Natural History Survey’s Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey) and U of I Extension. Bissonnette says there is currently very little known about this disease. Further research is needed to develop a complete understanding of this disease, its impact, and strategies for long term management. However, APHIS notes it is not believed to present a health risk to people or animals. For information about the biology, symptoms, or management of Xvv, visit http://cropwatch.unl.edu/bacterial-leaf-streak or http://broderslab.agsci.colostate.edu/corn-bacterial-leaf-streak/. Source: University of Illinois Extension
Fall Sale!
Fall Sale!>
5 Steps For Identifying Nutrient Deficiencies This Summer
As the summer growing season unfolds, the quest for ways to protect emerging crops is top of mind for many farmers. Dr. Robert Mullen, PotashCorp’s Director of Agronomy, has outlined five steps to help farmers to maximize yields by identifying nutrient deficiencies. These guidelines can help farmers accurately diagnose potential problems, take a corrective course of action and get them back to growing both yields and bottom line. Step 1: Make a visual assessment. Scouting the field to visually identify exact problem areas is the first step. Nutrient deficient crops can often be identified by chlorosis, (yellowing within the leaf). Stunted growth or leaves that are smaller than usual are also cues farmers should look for. As a general rule of thumb, issues within the lower half of the plant (the older growth) usually signify deficiencies in nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium or magnesium. Issues with the upper half of the plant (the newer growth), can signify an inadequate supply of sulfur or micronutrient metals. For example, a manganese deficiency in soybean plants will be visible in the upper part of the canopy in the new growth of the plant, but the leaf veins will retain their green color. Sulfur will cause chlorosis in the new growth. Step 2: Conduct a diagnostic soil test. Testing soil for nutrient deficiencies, also known as field diagnostics, is different than collecting soil information to maintain a fertility program. During the diagnostic soil testing process, farmers should collect samples from both the unaffected and affected soil areas. Ten to fifteen cores should be collected from both areas to get a full representation of each area. Step 3: Conduct a plant tissue analysis. The plant tissue analysis process is similar to diagnostic soil testing, as farmers should collect 10-15 samples from both the unaffected and affected areas. Two key times to collect samples are early in the season and midseason. When collecting early in the season, farmers should collect the entire plant. If collecting midseason, farmers should collect the uppermost leaves in the canopy of broadleaves and collect leaves right next to where the ears develop in corn. Step 4: Analyze historical information. If farmers have been able to document micronutrient issues in specific areas in the past, they could forego the first three steps and be prepared to apply fertilizer to deal with that issue. During this step farmers should be aware that there is a chance some of their crops won’t show any symptoms, but the fields may produce yields that are lower than predicted. This is an indication of hidden hunger, which can be fixed by paying close attention to the soil test results. Step 5: Prescribe a corrective course of action. After conducting steps one through four, farmers may arrive at a simple corrective course of action that will take care of the issues they’re experiencing. However, if farmers still aren’t sure where the problem lies, Dr. Mullen suggests taking an educated guess and applying test strips within the fields to see what takes care of the problem. Some issues can be taken care of during the current growing season, such as micronutrient deficiencies that can be treated with a foliar application fertilizer. If dealing with macronutrient issues, such as phosphorus or potassium, farmers should consider waiting to make applications after harvest to satisfy the crops’ demand for the next growing season. After conducting this process there is a chance not every problem will be solved, but these five-steps will help get yields back on the right track. Source: Matt Hopkins, CropLife
Vilsack Comments on Latest Quarterly Export Forecasts
Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack issued the following statement on the first forecast for U.S. agricultural exports for fiscal year 2017 and a revised forecast for fiscal year 2016. Both forecasts indicate U.S. agricultural exports have begun to rally and will continue the record-setting pace that began in 2009. "These numbers once again demonstrate the resiliency and reliability of U.S. farmers and ranchers in the face of continued challenges. The projected $133 billion in total exports for FY 2017 is up $6 billion from last forecast and would be the sixth-highest total on record. The United States' agricultural trade surplus is also projected to rise to $19.5 billion, up 40 percent from $13.9 billion in FY 2016. The United States has continued to post an agricultural trade surplus since recordkeeping began in the 1960s. "The projected growth in exports in 2017 is led by increases in overseas sales of U.S. oilseeds and products, horticultural goods, cotton, livestock, dairy and poultry. And with a rise in global economic growth, global beef demand is expected to strengthen. While USDA continues working to eliminate the remaining restrictions on U.S. beef exports that were instituted by some trading partners as a result of the December 2003 BSE detection, U.S. beef exports have recovered. U.S. beef exports are expected to reach $5.3 billion in 2017, well above the $1.5 billion exported in FY 2004. This progress is due to USDA's work under the Obama Administration to eliminate BSE-related restrictions in countries around the world, including 16 countries since January 2015. BEEF FACT SHEET "China is projected to return as the United States' top export market in 2017, surpassing Canada as the number one destination for U.S. agricultural goods. "USDA also revised the forecast for FY 2016 exports to $127 billion, up $2.5 billion from the previous forecast. This would bring total agricultural exports since 2009 to more than $1 trillion, smashing all previous eight-year totals. "Exports are responsible for 20 percent of U.S. farm income, also driving rural economic activity and supporting more than one million American jobs on and off the farm. The United States has the opportunity to expand those benefits even further through passage of new trade agreements such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Such agreements are key to a stable and prosperous farm economy, helping boost global demand for U.S. farm and food products, increasing U.S. market share versus our competitors, and ensuring that our farmers and ranchers have stable and predictable markets for the quality goods they produce." Source: USDA
CoBank: Co-ops and Other Ag Retailers Face Tighter Margins, Cyclical Challenges
Accounts receivable at farm supply co-ops and other ag retailers are growing and so are their challenges, according to a new report from CoBank. After an extended run of impressive financial performances, retailers are adjusting to a tougher economic environment accompanying the down-phase of the current ag commodity cycle. Current headwinds are directly related to a sharp decline in commodity prices that has reduced farm income and tightened farm cash flows. A downturn in fertilizer prices and a spate of mergers and acquisitions in the seed and fertilizer industry have aligned to create adversity for ag retailers going forward. "The drop in farm income over the past three years is the steepest decrease since the Depression," says Tanner Ehmke, CoBank senior economist covering, the grains, oilseeds and ethanol, and farm supply sectors. "Producer incomes have fallen more than 50 percent from 2013 to today and their debt-to-income ratio is on the rise. Not surprisingly, total accounts receivable for ag retailers posted an 11 percent gain for 2015, and that's expected to grow in the year ahead due to ongoing farmer cash flow challenges." Farmers stretching existing credit lines, cutting costs and reducing pre-pay practices have retailers unsure about demand opportunities. Being more price sensitive creates additional competitive pressures on ag retailers as farmers explore new supplier sources in search of ways to lower expenses. Fertilizer sales usually account for about half of ag retailers' total revenue, so falling prices have made it difficult for them to maintain positive margins. Forecasts call for the slide to continue through 2017 as commodity values remain under significant pressure from abundant supplies in the United States and throughout the world. Retailers are searching for every edge to maintain fertilizer sales and margins, forging new relationships and alliances with wholesalers where possible, while offering value-added services as a way to retain existing customers or entice new ones. "The biggest challenge for ag retailers going forward will be to manage inventory to sync with demand," notes Ehmke. Lastly, seed and crop protection companies are experiencing a new wave of consolidation, creating ambiguity and insecurity about product offerings, prices and competition in the industry. Ag retailers are keenly concerned that with reduced competition, there could be fewer seed and chemical brands to choose from, as well as reduced innovation in the industry that could result in fewer product offerings in the future. The consolidation wave could also leave ag retailers with less bargaining power, potentially reducing their ability to negotiate prices or rebates on volume sales. Furthermore, many ag retailers face rising operating expenses-including payrolls and benefits-and higher depreciation costs following years of infrastructure investment and new facilities. While these upgrades were necessary, they now contribute to a drag on profits. "On a positive note, it appears the drop in net farm income is slowing," notes Ehmke. This is based off USDA's projections for 2016 that call for a 2% reduction in net farm income year-over-year, compared to 2015 when net farm income dropped 38% year-over-year and 2014 when it dropped 27 percent. "For ag retailers, the questions are, 'What are you going to do to get through this rough patch? How will you adapt your cost structure and industry relationships while serving your customers as that valued partner?'" he asks. "When we do get through this cycle, those businesses that have been able to adapt stand to benefit from a significant payout on the other side," Ehmke concludes. A brief video synopsis of the report, "Ag Retailers - Cyclical Challenges Ahead" is available on CoBank's YouTube page. The full report is available to media upon request. Source: AgriMarketing
Fighting Corn Rootworm with Natural Predators Just Might Work
A handful of scientists believe better corn rootworm control is closer than we think — specifically, just under our feet. Your average cornfield hosts an impressive array of life. Microbes, bacteria, fungi, nematodes and insect predators like spiders, mites and beetles can lurk in every square foot of soil. There’s growing evidence they could be deployed against corn rootworm larvae. “We need to fight fire with fire,” said Jonathan Lundgren, an independent agroecologist and entomologist, who has been studying the natural predators of corn rootworm for more than a decade. “Corn rootworm is a very plastic and dynamic critter and we need to use something equally plastic and dynamic to fight it. Why not use what Mother Nature made a long time ago?” While Lundgren has been studying how to encourage insect predator communities, Cornell University entomologist Elson Shields has spent the better part of his career successfully deploying local nematodes against the devastating alfalfa snout beetle in New York. He’s now found that a combination of two nematode species may decimate rootworm populations. Out west, University of Nebraska entomologist Julie Peterson, is helping her graduate student, Camila Oliveira Hofman, hunt down fungal diseases of insects (called entomopathogenic fungi) that infect and destroy rootworm larvae. Success from these scientists would be a boon to corn growers. Western corn rootworm has evolved resistance to nearly every chemical and biotech tool deployed against it in the past few decades. Biological control options could supplement both Bt and the next generation of RNAi rootworm traits, and perhaps supplant some of them. THE NEMATODE WHISPERER Shield’s beetle-eating nematodes are the ideal farm investment. Alfalfa farmers in New York inoculated their soil with them once, using an evening field surface spray that cost $26 an acre. Now more than a decade later, those nematodes are still completely suppressing alfalfa snout beetle populations in alfalfa fields. Their taste for rootworm larvae was discovered when Shields turned his attention to how well the nematodes survived if farmers rotated out of alfalfa to another crop, such as corn. To his surprise, the nematodes not only survived the corn rotation, but their numbers increased. “Their increases appear to coincide with when we see rootworm move in,” Shields said. Two years ago, he inoculated a continuous corn field and a corn-soybean rotation field with the nematodes and set up some untreated and Bt-corn fields nearby. The 2015 season proved too light a rootworm year to collect data. But in 2016, rootworms gnawed away at corn roots in the untreated control, causing up to 1.9 nodes of damage, Shields said. Fields with his nematodes performed exactly as well as the Bt fields, which were planted to Yieldgard, Herculex, and Smartstax hybrids. “The key is that the nematodes were applied two years ago,” Shields marveled. “We’ve worked really hard at keeping those persistent characteristics in these populations.” Much more than one year of data is needed to confirm the nematodes’ efficacy against rootworm, but the results are so promising others are jumping on board. Monsanto has funded a project with USDA scientists in Columbia, Missouri, to find strains of nematodes in the Midwest that target the rootworm. Some of these soil nematodes are attracted to rootworm-damaged corn roots, so the goal of the funded proposal is to help control Bt-resistant rootworm populations by targeting damaged Bt-corn roots with them. “We need two things,” said USDA-ARS entomologist Bruce Hibbard, an advisor on the Missouri project. “We need strains that overwinter here in the Midwest, and we need to figure out how to maintain them for as long as possible. That might require some alternate sources of food, such as cover crops.” COVER CROPS: FODDER FOR ROOTWORM PREDATORS? Lundgren has long promoted winter cover crops to suppress rootworm populations, though not specifically for nematodes. His research is focused on larger, more visible field warriors — spiders, ants, centipedes, beetles and other insects. Lundgren’s work revealed that rootworm blood has a repellent quality that keeps many biting insects at bay. However, sucking insects like spiders and ants appear to feast on the rootworm quite happily. Cover crops can lure these predators to your field, Lundgren says. His work in South Dakota showed that cornfields planted after a winter cover crop of slender wheatgrass had higher insect predator populations and less rootworm damage than fields that lay bare over the winter. Researchers found populations of ants, beetles and other insects, many of them with bits of rootworm DNA in their tiny tummies. “Overall, we’ve identified dozens of predator species as being important consumers of corn rootworm,” Lundgren said. HUNTING FOR FUNGAL WEAPONS Like Shields, Peterson and Hofman have been looking to the soil for rootworm solutions. For two years, Hofman dug up hundreds of soil cores from five irrigated cornfields in southwest Nebraska. She used a common fishbait insect called the waxworm to lure the fungi. When they infected her bait, she collected the fungi, grew them out in petri dishes and identified them. Now, armed with a library of local Nebraska fungal insect diseases, Hofman will see which ones attack rootworm larvae. The project is funded by the Nebraska Corn Board. Peterson and Hofman also will test any promising fungal candidates against non-target insects to protect beneficial insect populations. The biological organisms these researchers are working on may be rootworm solutions in and of themselves, but they are most likely to be supplements to the system in place, Peterson said. “The great thing about biological options is they can be completely compatible with Bt traits,” she said. “We can get less broad-spectrum insecticide use, which will help conserve these natural enemies.” Lundgren has even more ambitious hopes for biological rootworm control. He wants growers to stop seeing corn rootworm as a target for insecticides and other controls, but rather a warning sign. “Corn rootworm isn’t the problem, it’s a symptom telling you something in the field is out of whack,” he said. He believes corn monocultures planted year after year into tilled fields have banished the valuable inhabitants of fields and soils, and with them, the rootworm’s natural enemies. “We are creating our own rootworm problems by reducing biodiversity in our cornfields,” he said. “When you have a diverse insect community, then rootworms aren’t an issue anymore.” Source: AgFax
Grasshoppers in South Dakota Sunflower
While at Dakotafest we received reports of large grasshopper populations in sunflower in South Central South Dakota. Grasshoppers are not usually a significant pest of sunflower and cause limited defoliation. However, it is still important to monitor and manage their populations when necessary. After examining several photographs, the differential grasshopper was identified as the most abundant species. Injury & Damage to Sunflower Grasshoppers are capable of feeding on both the leaves and the developing seeds of sunflower. Sunflowers can tolerate as much as 25% defoliation injury. Defolation caused by grasshoppers will appear as large chunks missing from the leaves. However, this late in the season, the adult grasshoppers are capable of completely removing leaves. In addition to defoliation, grasshoppers can also damage sunflower by feeding on the developing seeds. Thresholds for Managing Grasshoppers in Sunflower For defoliation injury, the threshold is based on the number of grasshoppers present in the area. When populations exceed 8 adults per square yard, management is necessary to prevent yield loss. Management decisions should be made after scouting both the border rows as well as the interior of the field. Grasshopper populations can vary dramatically between these two areas. If sunflower seeds are being consumed, grasshopper populations should be treated to avoid yield loss. For a list of insecticides that are labeled for grasshopper management in sunflower please refer to the current edition of the South Dakota Pest Management Guide: Alfalfa and Oilseeds. Source: Adam Varenhorst, South Dakota State University Extension
NDA, Agriculture: Front and Center at the Nebraska State Fair
LINCOLN ? Agriculture and the Nebraska State Fair go hand in hand. That?s why the Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) is an active partner with the Nebraska State Fair. NDA staff will be available throughout this year?s 10-day State Fair answering questions and assisting at the ?Raising Nebraska? exhibit, protecting animal health with livestock inspections, coordinating the Elite Showman Competition, inspecting weights and measuring devices, and more.
Nebraska Ag Update - August 25, 2016
Nebraska Ag Updates
CASE IH Introduces New Spray Technology
Case IH introduced new AIM Command FLEX advanced spray technology to help producers with more accurate applications. AIM Command FLEX uses pulse width modulation to enhance sprayer productivity by controlling product flow and pressure more precisely than conventional rate controllers. Other AIM Command FLEX features include: The ability to preset spray rates up to 30 per cent higher than the target rate on up to eight nozzles. 36 separate boom sections give producers more precise control across the boom and throughout the field. Speed ranges of 8:1 versus 2:1 can help producers maintain consistent application rates over a variety of speeds. It can also control drift on demand by allowing the operator to preset two spray pressures and toggle between them while spraying. “For example, one of the settings could deliver the target pressure for the desired droplet size, and the second setting could produce lower pressure for selective drift control in sensitive areas,” Case said in a release. “Or operators could select a higher pressure for the second setting to achieve greater canopy penetration when needed.” Source: Farms.com
The 7 Cover Crop Option You Should Know
There are several options when it comes to choosing cover crops. You need to know the conditions of your farm and what goals you want to achieve. Here are some details on a few popular cover crops to help you make the right choice for your farm. 1. Cereal Rye Cereal rye is the most popular cover crop in Iowa and the one Michael Castellano, professor of soil science, Iowa State University, recommends for beginners. Cereal rye has potential to grow in almost every climate, but it grows best in cool, temperate zones. This cover crop provides farmers with flexibility to plant cover crops later in the season, while still producing significant results. Benefits of cereal rye include: Reduced erosion: Cereal rye provides protection on bare fields to minimizing soil loss during the off-season. Organic matter: Cereal rye can produce up to 10,000 pounds of biomass per acre. Weed and pest suppressor: It is very effective against small-seeded annual weeds, due to its high biomass. 2. Oats Oats are an ideal choice for farmers in search of a low-cost, reliable cover crop. They grow the best in well-drained soil and under cool and moist conditions. Some benefits of oats are: Nutrient increase: When planted early, oats take up excess nitrogen and phosphorous in the soil. Weed suppressor: Due to quick germination, oats smother weeds before they are able to spread. Organic matter: When managed correctly, oats can produce 2,000-4,000 pounds of biomass. 3. Turnips Turnips are a great cover-crop option for farmers who graze cattle on their fields after harvest. The relatively inexpensive crop can survive the winter, allowing cattle to eat the turnips throughout the cold months. Benefits of turnips include: Nutrient increase: Turnips grow very fast, which helps them scavenge high amounts of nitrogen. Weed suppressor: The decomposing residue suppresses weeds until the spring. 4. Tillage Radish As its name would suggest, tillage radishes thrive in no-till farming systems. The large taproot will take up soil nutrients to prevent leaching and will release the nutrients slowly back into the soil as the plant decomposes.. Be prepared: Tillage radishes need a smooth seedbed, a well-drained field and sufficient moisture for optimal growth. Tillage radish benefits include: Reduced erosion: Radishes are usually killed in the winter, which leaves a layer of decomposing material, providing erosion control. Nutrient increase: With the ability to grow more than three feet deep in just 60 days, tillage radish is great for scavenging residual nitrogen. Weed suppressor: Because it grows rapidly, tillage radishes eliminate nearly all weed growth by smothering weeds before they surface. Soil compaction: Due to the strong, deep roots, can reduce the effects of soil compaction by penetrating different layers of the soil. 5. White Clover When planted as a cover crop, clover performs best when used as mulch. With its tough stems and shallow roots, clover eliminates weeds much like mulch. Clover benefits include: Reduced erosion: White clover’s tough stems and dense, shallow root mass not only suppresses weeds but stops erosion as well. Nutrient increase: White clover can produce high amounts of nitrogen while providing it to growing crops. Value-added forage: Clover is digestible, allowing cattle to graze after harvest. 6. Ryegrass For farmers not wanting to devote many resources to cover crops but still wanting to build quality soil, versatile ryegrass could be the answer. With the right amount of fertility and moisture, ryegrass has the ability to grow just about anywhere. Ryegrass benefits include: Reduced erosion: Ryegrass has an extensive root system and can even withstand some flooding. Nutrient increase: It collects leftover nitrogen, reducing nitrate leaching over winter. Weed suppressor: Ryegrass establishes roots quickly, killing early-season weeds. Quick transition: When farmers switch to a no-till operation, it can take years for soil properties to adapt. Ryegrass has the ability to cut the transition time significantly. 7. Winter Wheat Winter wheat is commonly grown as a cash crop; recently, doubled as a cover crop. Lower seed costs and ease of management come springtime has helped it gain popularity. Ideally, a wheat cover crop is grown in no-till or reduced-tillage systems. Benefits of wheat include: Reduced erosion: Winter wheat serves as a winter cover crop that has enough biomass to protect the soil. Nutrient increase: Winter wheat gathers high amounts of nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium. Weed suppressor: Due to its rapid growth, winter wheat helps suffocate germinating weeds. Source: United Soybean Board
National
Michigan Breakfast on the Farms draw 77K
Breakfast on the Farm events have brought in more than 77,000 visitors to Michigan farms. The educational farm tours, coordinated by Michigan State University Extension, were started in 2009 to open farms up to consumers and provide an opportunity to learn about modern production practices. Sixth-generation dairy farmer Brad Hart of Hartland Dairy will be the 35th host farm this weekend in southeast Michigan.? He tells Brownfield after volunteering with several past events, he continues to be amazed with the responses of visitors.? He says they?ve been overwhelmed by the amount of people who want to be involved and have started turning away volunteers. Hart says the family farm was settled in Lenawee County in 1836 and today milks 1,000 cows. He says the event gives consumers the chance to see how their food is produced and how farmers care for their animals. AUDIO: Interview with Brad Hart http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/160823_BOTF-Hart.mp3 The post Michigan Breakfast on the Farms draw 77K appeared first on Brownfield Ag News.      
Statement by Agriculture Secretary Vilsack on Latest Quarterly Export Forecasts for 2016 and 2017
WASHINGTON, Aug. 25, 2016 ? Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today issued the following statement on the first forecast for U.S. agricultural exports for fiscal year 2017 and a revised forecast for fiscal year 2016. Both forecasts indicate U.S. agricultural exports have begun to rally and will continue the record-setting pace that began in 2009.
U.S. Beef Exports Continue to Outperform Pre-BSE Levels
Following the discovery of a case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in December 2003, U.S. beef and beef product exports fell. Since 2003, USDA has led a multi-agency, full-court press, dedicating significant resources to restore foreign market access for U.S. beef. As a result, U.S. beef shipments had regained pre-BSE volumes by 2011 and even reached record values by 2014. Another central element of the U.S. strategy to maintain and expand foreign market access is insistence on policies that are based on the guidelines of the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE).
USDA to Purchase Surplus Cheese for Food Banks and Families in Need, Continue to Assist Dairy Producers
WASHINGTON, Aug. 23, 2016 ? The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced plans to purchase approximately 11 million pounds of cheese from private inventories to assist food banks and pantries across the nation, while reducing a cheese surplus that is at its highest level in 30 years. The purchase, valued at $20 million, will be provided to families in need across the country through USDA nutrition assistance programs, while assisting the stalled marketplace for dairy producers whose revenues have dropped 35 percent over the past two years.
USDA Services Can Help Individuals and Small Businesses Affected by Flooding in Louisiana
WASHINGTON, Aug. 17, 2016 - The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reminds farmers and ranchers, families and small businesses affected by the severe storms and flooding in Louisiana that USDA has several programs that provide assistance before, during and after disasters. USDA staff in regional, state and parish offices are ready to help.
Secretary Vilsack Awards $17.8 Million to Cultivate the Next Generation of Farmers and Ranchers, Sets Stage for Continued New Farmer and Rancher Support
AMES, Iowa, Aug. 17, 2016 ? In a meeting with new and beginning farmers at Iowa State University today, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced a new investment of $17.8 million for 37 projects to help educate, mentor, and enhance the sustainability of the next generation of farmers.
Soybean powered biodiesel
http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/160815_MoSoySpotlight_Tew-1.mp3Demand for soybean oil can be seen at the local level. Christine Tew, Communications Director, Missouri Soybean Merchandizing Council, says Missouri State Fair trams are running on soybean powered biodiesel. More on that in this week?s Spotlight on Soybeans. Brought to you by Missouri?s soybean farmers and their checkoff. Learn more at mosoy.org The post Soybean powered biodiesel appeared first on Brownfield Ag News.      
Statement from Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack on the Death of Firefighter Justin Beebe
WASHINGTON, August 15, 2016?Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today released the following statement on the death of U.S. Forest Service firefighter Justin Beebe:
SEMO to test covered cattle feedlot in Missouri
Southeast Missouri State University is using a grant from the Missouri Beef Initiative to build a covered feedlot. Dr. Julie Weathers, associate ag professor, tells Brownfield it?ll be a three-sided building that will house 100 head of cattle. Weathers says they?ll compare the cattle there to those in an outdoor feedlot, ?The other side, literally in the same paddock, so that the conditions would be extremely similar will have a fenced off area and so we can feed similar cattle in BOTH sides.? Weathers says WEATHER will be one of the biggest parts of this study, ?We have to take into consideration how much humidity we get. Wind flow, because not all parts of Missouri are going to pick up as much wind as other parts. Things like that. The amount of rain, the amount of snow, ice, all those fun things.? Other Missouri universities,?including Lincoln University?in Jefferson City,?will conduct similar experiments to see if covered feedlots could be a viable option for finishing cattle in Missouri, which is a leading cow-calf state. Most Missouri cattle are finished in Kansas. http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/160805-Dr-Julie-Weathers-SEMO-Beef-indoors.mp3 The post SEMO to test covered cattle feedlot in Missouri appeared first on Brownfield Ag News.      
The next animal rights target
The U.S. animal rights movement has successfully packaged and pitched to the general media its ?victories? in battles over sow gestation stalls and cages for egg-laying hens.? The media, not knowing any better, has echoed this message broadly.? I submit it has less to do with animal rightist waging an honest and honorable campaign to end outmoded practices, and more to do with the backroom intimidation of corporate growers and food retailers, and the public capitulation by these companies to animal rights demands whether they make sense for the birds and the farmers or not. However, if our new friends in the eat-no-meat movement are to be believed, then which on-farm practice is the next target?? While I have no inside track on the strategies of the Humane Society of the U.S. (HSUS) and its cohorts, I?m guessing the next target will be the broiler industry specifically and poultry production of all varieties broadly, if only because we raise and kill more than?9 billion birds a year for food. The list of shortcomings in the chicken industry as catalogued by HSUS and others is long.? It starts with ending genetic selection for growth, replacing birds which reach slaughter weight in five to six weeks with varieties which hit that mark at something closer to the 16 weeks it took a broiler to reach market weight in 1920. Once the genetics of the bird are reversed, stocking densities in the ?warehouse-like sheds? in which they?re housed must be addressed, as in fewer birds in bigger houses, preferably with outside access.? This would also to a large extent solve the air quality issues animal rightists contend affect every bird barn in the country.? Then artificial ?24-hour? lighting must be done away with in favor of lighting that does not wreak havoc on the bird?s natural circadian rhythms or artificially stimulate its appetite. Let us not forget the world would be a much better place if all chicken feeds were made with organic, non-genetically engineered (GE) grains and oilseeds, and that simple ?management improvements? can take the place of veterinary use of technology, including animal drugs. Once the birds are mellowed by advanced age and atmosphere, the catching and crating systems must be addressed and improved, along with how the birds are transported and for how long, and the slaughter process must be totally reinvented. Will all of this improve chicken wellbeing?? Likely not.? Will bird health improve as disease outbreaks become rarer?? Likely not.? Will the cost of producing a broiler chicken go up?? Almost guaranteed, but shouldn?t the consumer pay more for a guiltless eating experience? ?It matters not that some folks may be priced out of the market for this form of animal protein as there?s always plant-based alternatives. The animal rights movement?s demands aren?t hidden, they?re well known and haven?t changed in over 30 years.? Smart poultry companies will evaluate those demands to determine which, if any, make sense when calculating bird wellbeing, then catalogue the steps already taken individually or as an industry to address these ?concerns.? ?The key is then to talk to the public in an honest way about how progressive the industry is which grows chickens, or turkeys, ducks and geese for that matter. ?The biggest mistake is to ?partner? with an animal rights group as a means of giving yourself consumer cred. Animal agriculture broadly underestimates the animal rights movement, particularly its firm belief in the rightness of its minority philosophy when it comes to animal welfare. ?The movement rightly identifies the retail end of the food chain as the industry?s Achilles heel when it comes to public pressure and corporate intimidation.? It?s what leaders in the movement now call the ?humane econo The post The next animal rights target appeared first on Brownfield Ag News.      
Animal health moving into vaccine research
Animal health companies are moving to provide vaccines rather than antibiotics for treating livestock. Bloomberg reports companies such as Subway and Perdue have public relations campaigns in favor of the non-use of antibiotics in the meat they sell. But animals still need to be treated for disease. And research centers, such as one built and operated by Elanco near Indianapolis are focused exclusively on developing vaccines as alternatives. Elanco plans to unveil several new vaccines this year and will invest two-thirds of the budget for its food-animal unit in alternatives to antibiotics. FDA rules on antibiotics, that used to be voluntary, become mandatory in January along with rule changes requiring veterinarians to oversee drugs currently bought over the counter. As the change approaches, the animal health industry is investing in resources to educate farmers and agribusiness leaders on the benefits of vaccines in place of antibiotics to treat livestock. The post Animal health moving into vaccine research appeared first on Brownfield Ag News.      
Talk of Farm Bill rewrite is premature
Rep. Collin Peterson (D, MN) ruined my week.? The House Agriculture Committee?s ranking member and former committee chair told a Minnesota radio station this week that low commodity and dairy prices could force his committee to write a new Farm Bill next year rather than waiting for the current farm policy package to expire in 2018. ?Writing? a new Farm Bill has always been and will always be one of the most painful legislative experiences around.? To me, it?s the best example of why legislation and sausage making should never be observed. Peterson said the problem with the current Farm Bill now in effect is that it was written during a time of high prices and income safety net programs are not sufficient to deal with the current downturn in prices to farmers.? This was a warning that echoed down the halls of both the House and Senate when the last Farm Bill was hammered together going back to 2011.? Today, just look to the record USDA payments announced this week in the newly minted Margin Protection Program (MPP) for dairy.? Just over $11 million was sent to a fortunate subset of dairy farmers this week ? those who bought protection at the right dollar level ? to offset income losses from falling domestic/world milk prices and narrowing margins. ?It hasn?t gotten to be too much of issue so far, but I think this winter is going to be a big problem,? Peterson told the Minnesota News Network during an appearance at Minnesota?s FarmFest. ?If it gets bad enough, it might force us to move a year early on the Farm Bill, which wouldn?t be a bad idea.? Ironically, I saw Peterson?s comments just after reading a synopsis of recent polling showing farmers and ranchers are more optimistic about the coming year than they?ve been in recent years.? They?re apparently ignoring both presidential hopefuls and their zeal to throw trade broadly and the TransPacific Partnership (TPP) specifically under the election bus.? As I said a week ago, U.S. agriculture does not grow unless it can exploit a global marketplace. Sen. Pat Roberts (R, KS), chair of the Senate Agriculture Committee and a veteran of more Farm Bills than any sitting member of Congress, has said nothing public about writing a new Farm Bill before the current package expires. ?This may be because he?s too busy protecting the current Farm Bill from being pillaged by budget and appropriations committee members when they go on their annual cost-cutting raids. ?I?m sure the memories of the pain in getting the last Farm Bill enacted are also still too vivid. House Agriculture Committee Chair Mike Conaway (R, TX) is also silent on any schedule for Farm Bill rewrites.? Conaway is playing his cards close to the vest, but he?s busy identifying issues within his committee?s jurisdiction important to urban House members as a means to build support for a new Farm Bill when it comes.? This includes finding a solution to why Americans ?wastes? up to 40% of the food they buy and maintaining the increasingly toxic political marriage of farm programs and the federal food stamp program in the same legislative package to balance urban and rural interests. Peterson said talk of stripping the food stamp program?out of the Farm Bill is unrealistic.? ?What?ll happen if you split them, food stamps will go on and the Farm Bill will end because there?s nobody to vote for the Farm Bill,? Peterson said. ?People just don?t get it. They?re not going to get rid of food stamps.? It?s just not going to happen.? I?m hoping the same for a 2017 rewrite of the Farm Bill. The post Talk of Farm Bill rewrite is premature appeared first on Brownfield Ag News.      
Greater-than-normal ?tip back? in some areas
Photo courtesy @SeedLINKED Some areas of the Midwest are seeing greater-than-normal ?tip back? of corn ears this year. Tip back is when the kernels don?t fill all the way out to the end of the ear. It?s usually related to weather stress. But tip back is not necessarily a bad thing, says Todd Claussen, director of agronomy for Ames, Iowa-based Landus Cooperative. ?Historically, tip back is part of crop production,? Claussen says. ?One, it?s your first indicator of where your population is, if you?re in a good population standpoint or not. You want some tip back.? Claussen says, in some cases, tip back can mean reduced yield. But he says it depends on how well the rest of the ear has developed. ?Guys have some real difficult moments as they husk corn back and look at their potential ears?and they go, ?Look at all that tip back?,? Claussen says. ?Yes, but how many kernels long do you have? Are you tipped back eight kernels, but are still 36 or 38 (kernels)?long? That?s a big ear.? Claussen says corn ears in northern Iowa usually average around 32 or 33 kernels in length. AUDIO: Todd Claussen http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/claussen-todd-tip-back-only-160803.mp3 The post Greater-than-normal ‘tip back’ in some areas appeared first on Brownfield Ag News.      
USDA Announces Safety Net Assistance for Milk Producers Due to Tightening Dairy Margins
WASHINGTON, Aug. 4, 2016 - Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack today announced approximately $11.2 million in financial assistance to American dairy producers enrolled in the 2016 Margin Protection Program for Dairy (MPP-Dairy). The payment rate for May/June 2016 will be the largest since the program began in 2014. The narrowing margin between milk prices and the cost of feed triggered the payments, as provided for by the 2014 Farm Bill.
Cattle buyer inquiry was light
Cattle buyer inquiry remained light on Wednesday afternoon with DTN reporting just a few bids in Kansas at 119.00, and Nebraska at 192.00. Asking prices are not well defined, but some producers have priced ready cattle around 125.00 in the South, and 200.00 to 205.00 in the North. Buying interest is not expected to increase until sometime on Thursday or Friday. The kill totaled 111,000 head, 2,000 below last week, but 1,000 more than last year. Boxed beef cutout values were steady on choice and sharply higher on select on light to moderate demand and heavy offerings. Choice beef was up .25 at 209.08, select was 2.14 higher at 196.93. Chicago Mercantile Exchange live cattle contracts settled 60 to 90 points lower. The strong support seen in some feeder cattle contracts and the bounce higher in beef values was not enough to overcome the widespread outside market losses, and concern that long term buyer support may be hard to sustain across the live cattle complex. Feeder cattle regained most of the losses seen in the early trade and settled 72 points higher to 57 lower. The aggressive fellow through pressure in the grain market created some support to feeder cattle futures, although the lack of support seen in live cattle markets worked to erode a portion of the buying activity. Feeder cattle receipts at the Ozarks Regional Stockyards at West Plains, Missouri totaled 2,990 head on Tuesday. Compared to last week, feeder steers traded 3.00 to 6.00 higher. Heifer calves were steady to 5.00 higher with too few yearlings last week for an adequate comparison, however undertones were higher. Demand was very good on a moderate supply which included several multi-pot load drafts of yearlings. Feeder steers medium and large 1 averaging 731 pounds brought 143.84 per hundredweight. Feeder heifers weighing 892 pounds averaged 125.91. Sharp losses of up to 262 points in the August and October lean hog contracts were seen on Wednesday with a lack of market fundamentals as well as further technical pressure. The market remained lower through the session based on a lack of volume in the complex, and outside market pressure which limited overall buyer interest. Barrows and gilts in the Iowa/Minnesota direct trade closed .92 lower at 78.47 weighted average on a carcass basis, the west was down .75 at 78.51, and nationally the market was .11 lower at 77.76. Missouri direct base carcass meat price was steady to 1.00 higher from 69.00 to 75.00. Midwest hogs on a live basis closed steady to 1.00 higher from 47.00 to 60.00. The pork carcass cutout value was up .81 at 90.07 FOB plant. While this week?s hog slaughter will naturally be cut back thanks to the Fourth of July break, many expect that weekly kills through the balance of July will be quite ample, probably not falling below 2.1 million to 2.15 million head. The Wednesday hog kill was estimated by USDA at 434,000 head, 8,000 more than last week, and 17,000 greater than last year. The post Cattle buyer inquiry was light appeared first on Brownfield Ag News.      
World
German Economy Minister Says EU-US Trade Talks Have Failed
In 14 rounds of talks, the two sides haven't agreed on a single common item out of 27 chapters being discussed.
Success Story: How Valagro Overcame Hurdles in the Biostimulant Market
“We continue to aggressively pursue the increasing demand in the row crop market segments in our key geographies.” –Prem Warrior, Chief Operating Officer, Valagro S.p.A. AgriBusiness Global recently sat down with Prem Warrior, Chief Operating Officer of Valagro, a top producer of biostimulants and specialty nutrient products. Warrior, who joined Valagro in 2012, discussed the evolution of the biostimulant market and how the company’s approach has changed along with it. In addition, look for more on biostimulants in the September issue of AgriBusiness Global.   How would you describe the evolution of biostimulants in recent years in how they are being integrated in crop protection businesses? Since the green revolution of the ’60s, due to advances in genetic technologies, we are close to achieving the limits of crop improvement in terms of the potential of seeds; even GMOs, while offering significant advances with stacking technologies and RNAi, are approaching their limits. Parallel to this, advances in synthetic chemistry, combinatorial chemistry and knowledge of specific pathways resulted in softer chemistries which have helped address chronic pest problems. However, the acute sensitivities on environmental and non-target effects of chemicals in addition to an overall desire to go natural have created a huge demand for biological products, specifically biologicals. Biostimulants, which are composed of natural extracts, ignored for a long time, have now received significant attention due to the recognition of their value as key components of an integrated crop management system. This interest is primarily due to the efforts of companies like Valagro which have championed the development of effective, credible products with stringent quality control measures and defined natural, yet prescriptive compositions with specific modes of action ? comparable to agrichemicals. Biostimulants offer solutions to address hitherto unsolved problems such as abiotic stress tolerance of crops like drought, chilling and salinity as well as enhancing the nutrient use efficiency (NUE) for crops, especially when nutrients can be the most limiting factor in crop productivity. They offer the versatility the farmer needs as inputs, while providing value-added solutions that integrate with seeds and agrichemicals as well as other crop inputs including fertilizers and biopesticides. What are the key products for Valagro in this area and what is your approach to integrating them into distribution? Valagro?s flagship product Megafol has continued to offer unprecedented value to the growers for more than three decades. We continue to work with our key growers and distributors in scores of countries to address their unique needs for abiotic stress situations on a variety of crops and developing customized solutions. While Megafol addresses the abiotic stress of plants, Viva with its unique combination of amino acids, humic acids and specific polysaccharides enhances the rhizosphere competence of the plant, revitalizes the soil, strengthens the plant root system which translates into better fruit set, fruit size and overall fruit quality without the any chemical PGRs. Even though our primary markets have been historically in the high cash value fruit and vegetable segments, we continue to aggressively pursue the increasing demand in the row crop market segments in our key geographies, especially North and South America, by addressing the specific needs of our customers. In fact, our market share in row crops has increased substantially in the last two to three years, indicating increased need with climate change and the consequent high demand for our products. How are distributors? and growers? education about biostimulants changing? What do they know now that they didn?t know before? Through our proprietary GeaPower technology platform, we have developed a systematic process of innovating, preserving the activity of natural extracts, ensuring the consistency of our products and finally providing unparalleled value to our customers, from the lab to the field. Valagro?s investment into defining the composition as well as the mode of action of our products, in addition to our approach of educating the end user as well as the distributor through our unique initiative Valagro Academy, has been a resounding success. The Valagro Academy initiative educates our customers on what our products are, how they work, and the best way to integrate products into a crop management system thus ensuring a good return on their investment. Valagro has pioneered this effort and we believe that brings us closer to our customers; an educated customer is our best customer. While the biostimulants do not have pesticidal attributes, a healthier plant is naturally more resistant to pests and diseases and thus needs less crop management inputs. For natural products, especially the biologicals, this approach helps us partner with the distributor/dealer team on the ground on the best ways to position and use our products, thus helping overcome one of the biggest hurdles in the adoption of biologicals worldwide. We have also developed our own process to recognize our best customers and work with them to offer customized solutions that meet their needs. What do you think are the keys to distribution of these products? As a biologist, my answer will always be good science leads to good products and by giving the farmer a strong ROI assures good customers. You cannot fail when you invest in good science and assure the quality and consistency of your products and most importantly, when we partner with our distributors and dealers. The key is to understand your customer and his/her needs ? both from the point of view of agronomics as well as their business. Customer loyalty is key to Valagro?s success and the majority of our customers are long-term customers. It is also important to define the value proposition for our offering and to guarantee a ROI of minimally 1:3. What other opportunities do you see for biostimulants? Also, which biostimulants are you seeing more demand for and what are the drivers? ?We have enough solutions to address most crop needs including pest and disease control. In order to address the needs of a growing population with less arable land and impending climate change issues, we need to continually promote the concept of sustainable agriculture. Water and soil will continue to be the major limiting factors in crop productivity in the next decade. Improving water and nutrient use efficiency through biostimulant solutions will be critical in all geographies. We also believe there will be an increased need to improve the soil quality including soil remediation and micronutrient deficiencies. There are already instances of crop loss due to single micronutrient deficiency in certain key agronomic parts of the world. We see opportunities for biostimulant companies to develop customized offerings that will address issues related to decreased arable land as well poor soil quality in addition to reduced water use efficiency. In addition, new generation of plant and microbial biostimulants can enhance the quality of produce ? an attribute that has become increasingly important for the more discriminant global consumer. Organic agriculture also continues to grow. Precision agriculture’s better forecasting will enable us to prescribe timely, customized solutions, and we will be able to integrate biologicals and optimize their value in an integrated crop management approach. We see biostimulants and biologicals as key elements in the future where prescriptive agriculture will evolve similar to personalized medicine. At Valagro, where ?science serves nature,” our vision is to bring together the best in biological sciences to the service of our customers ? sustainably.
Cattle Outlook: Beef Cold Storage Numbers Up
USDA says there were 469 million pounds of beef in cold storage at the end of July. 
Have Dairy Prices Peaked for the Year?
We may be moving into the perfect storm with an increasing dairy herd, strong milk production, slow exports, and growing inventory coming together requiring lower prices in order to stimulate greater buyer interest.
Certis Europe, K&N Efthymiadis form JV in Eastern and Southern Europe
Certis Europe and K&N Efthymiadis have announced the creation of a new company, KNE Certis, a joint venture which will serve to bring the experience, expertise and resources of both companies to the development, registration, marketing and distribution of crop protection products in South Eastern Europe. The new joint venture will extend the presence of both companies in the region and will provide potential access to more of the European market, by operating in Bulgaria, Romania, Moldova, all countries of the former Yugoslavia, Albania, and Cypress. The supervisory board of the new company will be shared between Certis and Efthymiadis and will comprise two directors from Certis and three from Efthymiadis. Certis Europe has taken an initial shareholding of 30% in the new company with an intention to increase this shareholding in the future. Certis Europe CEO Mark Waltham commented; ?Certis Europe and K&N Efthymiadis have collaborated together for more than 15 years, so the creation of KNE Certis is logical progression but one that we are excited to be making. KNE Certis will allow both companies to extend our market presence and build on what Vassos Efthymiadis and his team have already established.? We are particularly focussed on developing our joint portfolio in vegetable and fruit crops in this growing region?. K&N Efthymiadis CEO Vassos Efthymiadis added; ?Certis Europe and Mitsui & Co have been valued partners for many years and we are pleased to enter into this new phase of our relationship. Working together in this way, we believe that we can bring a fresh new approach to the delivery of innovative crop protection solutions to growers in South Eastern Europe and beyond?.
From the Editor: Brexit and Other Chaos
Uncertainty breeds fear. Unfortunately, Britain?s vote to leave the EU created layers of uncertainty around financial and currency markets around the world. The massive short-term sell-off that immediately followed the vote has largely rebounded in stock markets, but it will be some time before questions about Brexit will stop influencing markets. While both EU and UK leadership are looking for a speedy exit, there will inevitably be some fallout that has the potential to affect crop inputs during the next year: 1) Currency markets will affect all manufacturers. The wildly fluctuating British pound and devalued euro have the potential to make sales more profitable for importers and less profitable for manufacturers in Europe if companies are doing business in local currencies. The dollar remains strong compared to all currencies, which means deals done in USD will be more expensive for EU buyers and potentially less lucrative for EU sellers, possibly putting downward pressure on already low product prices. 2) Interest rates will remain unchanged. Maybe. Central banks around the world, including the U.S. Federal Reserve, have stated that they likely won?t make any moves on interest rates until they can better understand the effects of Brexit. The less transparent the effects of Brexit, the more likely we will see these wait-and-see policies in the financial markets. The Bank of England suggested that it will create additional financial stimulus at its August meeting, but the central bank will need to evaluate how investors will react to the first interest rate change since 2009. 3) EU legislative processes will become more protracted. The EU parliamentary process isn?t known for being quick, and that will worsen as British MPs resign their committee chairs and other responsibilities. Does UK have the right to vote during its transition? Will those resolutions be binding if UK casts a crucial swing vote? No one really knows, and that?s part of the reason the EU wants a speedy divorce. Couple that with the fact that Britain was slated to be president of the Council of the EU in 2018, and there is a potential that Britain could preside over the terms of its own exit, which will be a conflict of interest that likely won?t be tolerated. 4) British farmers will enjoy fewer subsidies. Regardless of how the UK will structure its agriculture policy, it is unlikely the government will be able to fund farmer payouts at the same level that they are funded under the EU?s Common Agriculture Policy. This might not have deep impact, but there will be some changes. 5) Regulations in UK will be more favorable for ag technology. Britain?s science-based regulatory systems was often at odds with EU policies, however many of the policies that govern GMOs and special-use exemptions for certain chemistries were left up to the member states. Brexit could open up a more robust agriculture market in the UK, a small but important one. So many uncertainties still exist that the EU is right to call for the fastest possible solution, and it might go down in history as the most deliberate and decisive move the trading bloc has made since its inception.
2016 Pro Farmer Midwest Crop Tour Wrap Up
Pro Farmer Crop Tour Leaders discuss Tour results on U.S. Farm Report.
Acadian Plant Health Hires First Business Development Manager for South Asia
Acadian Plant Health?hired Soumendu Ghosh as its Business Development Manager for South Asia. Ghosh will be responsible for developing strong, lasting relationships with growers, distribution partners, and key influencers throughout the southern part of the Asian continent. Soumendu Ghosh, Business Development Manager for South Asia, Acadian Plant Health With over 20 years of experience, Ghosh has built a reputation as a solid professional within the agricultural industry and, throughout his career, he has worked in diverse roles related to product and crop management, sales and marketing, and the development of business, markets and new products. ?We are delighted to welcome Soumendu to the Acadian team,? said Roger Tripathi, President of Acadian Plant Health. ?His educational and professional background, extensive market knowledge, collaborative nature, and sheer passion will be a tremendous asset for our organization.? ?I decided to join the Acadian team because they provide plant health solutions that truly address grower needs. I know that a lot of exciting work lies ahead and I can’t wait to start contributing to the growth of this incredible company,? Ghosh says. Ghosh earned a B.Sc. in Agricultural Science from Birsa Agricultural University in India as well as a Post Graduate degree in Business Management from the Indian Institute of Management in India. Ghosh comes to Acadian Plant Health having worked in a variety of positions throughout his career and, most recently, he held the title of Head of Marketing and Business Strategy for an Indian subsidiary of a large, publicly traded crop protection company.  
Tessenderlo Kerley and Sipcam Create Licensing Agreement
Tessenderlo Kerley, Inc. (TKI) and Sipcam (Sipcam) signed?a licensing agreement settling their dispute involving TKI?s intellectual property covering sunburn protectant agricultural products. TKI?s NovaSource?crop protection business unit markets its highly engineered calcined kaolin product, Surround?Crop Protectant, globally. The U.S. Labor Department?s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued final regulations on June 23, 2016 outlining new lower thresholds for worker exposure to crystalline silica. Per OSHA?s guidelines, if respirable particles are present in quantities that exceed certain thresholds, this naturally occurring mineral contaminant can cause cancer. In January 2014, TKI received a patent covering the creation of agricultural particle films of hydrous kaolin, or calcium carbonate without having harmful levels of crystalline silica (US 8,637,091 B2). The technology utilizes a water wash technique to remove the silica, ensuring agricultural workers are not exposed to harmful levels when mixing, loading, or when conducting in-field activities such as during pruning or harvest. As part of the agreement, Sipcam will market Cocoon?under license TKI granted Sipcam to utilize the patented technology. ?TKI uses the highest quality of kaolin raw materials in its own SURROUND product, and is pleased to offer its safety technology to other suppliers to ensure maximum stewardship efforts are practiced for all the agricultural uses of kaolin,? states David Cassidy, group vice president of TKI. NovaSource is the crop protection business unit of TKI and is responsible for developing and marketing crop protection products for niche agricultural markets globally. For more information, visit novasource.com. TKI produces and markets specialty chemical solutions, including fertilizers, crop protection chemicals and process chemicals and services to diverse markets around the world. TKI operates 11 manufacturing plants in North America in addition to an extensive terminal network. TKI is a subsidiary of Tessenderlo Group, Brussels, Belgium.
Cooler Temps for Midwest Later in Week
Scattered showers in Southern Plains
Gowan Crop Protection Opens UK Office
Gowan Crop Protection Limited, an affiliate of Gowan Co. L.L.C., has opened an office at Rothamsted Research in Harpenden, England to manage its growing business in the UK and its international operations. Gowan Comercio Internacional e Servicos Limited (GCIS), the Portugal-based entity that previously facilitated Gowan’s international operations, will cease to operate and Gowan Crop Protection Limited will take on the business. The transaction is planned to take effect September 2nd, 2016. GCIS was formed in 2004 to bring Gowan’s products to the world stage and better position the company as a global player in the crop protection industry. Since then, the company’s worldwide presence has developed steadily and GCIS has outgrown its existing infrastructure, resulting in the need for a more centralized and coordinated office from which to manage Gowan’s international business activities. A number of factors were considered in determining where to establish domicile for the new office including tax burden and tax treaties, employee availability and skill level, business and employment law, and global accessibility, particularly from the U.S. and Europe. After much consideration it was agreed that The Rothamsted Centre for Research and Enterprise (RoCRE) in the UK?is the optimal location for this new international hub. Juli Jessen, Gowan Group CEO stated, “RoCRE presents an exceptional opportunity for us to find a home that fits our ‘muddy boots’ culture and we are excited to be surrounded by innovators in agriculture.” RoCRE is a unique center focused on promoting collaboration and innovation by partnering with commercial agriculture technology businesses and advancing the research process. RoCRE is part of the historical Rothamsted Research located in the Hertfordshire countryside, served by excellent transport links to London and the rest of Europe. Renowned for its expertise as the world’s oldest agri-science research center, RoCRE offers a range of facilities, including state-of-the-art conference facilities, flexible laboratory space and meeting hubs, providing exciting opportunities for Gowan’s international business to thrive.
Pilots-For-Hire Cramming for Test as the Age of Drones Arrives
Thousands of would-be drone pilots are racing to get licensed under new U.S. regulations that have opened an aerial stampede.
Dollar Dominates Demand Ideas
Grain markets are lower as the US Dollar continues to work higher. Outside markets are lower as traders deal with Fed Chairman?s comments last Friday.​
The Week Ahead: August 29-September 4, 2016
Politics will still be the focus for the final week of the congressional break. As the candidates continue to work their way toward November 8, some subtle shifts in their stances and views on certain issues have developed. As the process continues, those shift points could become very important on issues like immigration and other hot-button items as November elections get closer and especially as voters start to focus on those elections.
Corn Silage Pricing App Makes its Timely Debut
Local conditions do vary, but for the most part, corn silage harvest occurs between late August and early November. In time for the 2016 corn silage harvest is a new app developed by two University of Wisconsin Extension agents that will help farmers quickly estimate the value of their standing corn silage.