Ashburn VA

Friday
Partly Cloudy
92°F / 67°F
Wind: 8 SSW
Average Humidity: 62
The Next Three Days

Saturday
Clear
91°F / 64°F
Wind: 9 S
Humidity: 60

Sunday
Chance of Rain
87°F / 66°F
Wind: 8 SSE
Humidity: 62

Monday
Chance of a Thunderstorm
83°F / 64°F
Wind: 5 SSW
Humidity: 77
Close
@C - CORN - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Jul '16 409'2 406'4 407'6 -0'4
Sep '16 411'2 408'4 409'4 -1'0
Dec '16 410'4 407'6 408'4 -1'2
Mar '17 417'0 414'6 415'6 -0'6
May '17 420'0 418'2 418'6 -1'0
Jul '17 423'2 421'4 421'6 -0'4
@S - SOYBEANS - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Jul '16 1085'0 1075'0 1079'0 -0'6
Aug '16 1082'0 1072'0 1077'0 -0'2
Sep '16 1067'2 1057'2 1062'6 1'0
Nov '16 1056'0 1045'0 1051'2 0'6
Jan '17 1052'2 1041'4 1048'4 1'4
Mar '17 1028'6 1025'0 1028'2 2'4
May '17 1025'0 1021'6 1021'6 0'6
@K - HARD RED WINTER WHEAT - KCBT
Month High Low Last Chg
Jul '16 462'2 458'0 459'0 -3'2
Sep '16 478'0 474'0 475'0 -3'4
Dec '16 501'4 497'4 498'4 -3'0
Mar '17 514'6 514'2 514'6 -3'0
@L - LIVE CATTLE - CME
Month High Low Last Chg
Jun '16 119.500 116.450 118.925 0.775
Aug '16 115.700 111.450 115.350 1.950
@C - COTTON #2 - ICEFU
Month High Low Last Chg
Jul '16 64.59 64.16 64.20 -0.13
Oct '16
Dec '16 63.98 63.76 63.76 -0.18
DTN Click here for info on Exchange delays.
Local
Has the time come to consider mixing higher blends of biofuels with ...
Has the time come to consider mixing higher blends of biofuels with gasoline? What's the best source for that biofuel today? Corn! Follow the link for an informative article! http://ow.ly/co4b300D6vw>
National
Livestock futures close higher
A light to moderate cattle trade developed in parts of cattle country with the best test evident in Kansas and Texas. With most sales at 125.00, the Southern live trade is nearly $6.00 lower than last week. Asking prices on unsold cattle appears to be around 128.00 plus in the South, and 200.00 plus in the North. The kill totaled 113,000 head, the same as last week, but 1,000 smaller than a year ago. Boxed beef cutout values were lower on light to moderate demand and offerings. Choice beef was down .85 at 222.72, and select was 1.82 lower at 203.26. Chicago Mercantile Exchange live cattle contracts settled 77 to 195 points higher. The market wavered in a wide price range and volume remained rather light. The August through the December contracts saw the most support and markets traded in a narrow trading range for much of the session. Feeder cattle settled 42 to 272 points higher and like the live cattle trade there were wide price swings as light trade volume was seen. The ability to bring buyers back to the market following the early triple digit losses seen through the morning trade created some follow through momentum that could be carried into the holiday weekend. Feeder cattle receipts at the Springfield, Missouri Livestock Marketing Center totaled 1616 head on Wednesday. Compared to the previous week, steers sold 3.00 to 8.00 lower with heifers 6.00 to 8.00 lower, spots up to 12.00 lower. Feeder steers medium and large 1 averaging 614 pounds brought 159.06 per hundredweight. 521 pound heifers averaged 141.38. Lean hogs settled 25 to 157 higher as strong gains quickly developed through the lean market, pushing nearby contracts back above the $80.00 price level. This gave the entire complex a sense of momentum as traders remained focused on additional buyer interest over the market. Barrows and gilts in the Iowa/Minnesota direct trade closed .28 lower at 73.56 weighted average on a carcass basis, the West was down .37 at 73.40, and nationally the market was 1.82 lower at 72.74. Missouri direct base carcass meat price is steady from 64.00 to 68.00. Midwest hogs on a live basis are lightly tested, steady from 47.00 to 50.00. The pork carcass cutout value was down 1.46 at 83.57 FOB plant. For the week ending May 21, Iowa barrows and gilts averaged 289.2 pounds, .4 pounds lighter than the previous week, and 2.5 pounds heavier than 2015. The seasonal trend toward lighter weights should persist for another 30 to 45 days. The hog slaughter was estimated at 428,000 head, 32,000 more than last week, and 18,000 greater than last year. The post Livestock futures close higher appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
World
As Seed Companies Combine, Farmers Suspect Competition and Innovation Will Suffer
The latest news that Bayer AG wants to buy Monsanto has the agriculture industry wondering yet again how the growing consolidation in the seed and crop chemical industry could affect farmers large and small. 
Facebook
Has the time come to consider mixing higher blends of biofuels with ...
Has the time come to consider mixing higher blends of biofuels with gasoline? What's the best source for that biofuel today? Corn! Follow the link for an informative article! http://ow.ly/co4b300D6vw>
There are 2 days left to get your submission in! There are some great ...
There are 2 days left to get your submission in! There are some great pictures coming in!>
Update on the Bayer Bid on Monsanto!! Monsanto rejects Bayer bid, but ...
Update on the Bayer Bid on Monsanto!! Monsanto rejects Bayer bid, but open to more talks: http://ow.ly/14zW300xwUy>
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Aurora Cooperative recognizes and supports all those who have gone ...
Aurora Cooperative recognizes and supports all those who have gone through, are going through and will go through cancer! On this Friday we are honoring our Friend, Erin "She's a Fighter" Rust!>
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It's Giveaway time! Share a photo below of your 2016 planting or ...
It's Giveaway time! Share a photo below of your 2016 planting or emerging crops for a chance to win some "A" gear along with a Cabela's Gift Card!>
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Aurora Cooperative is working hard with these other groups to push ...
Aurora Cooperative is working hard with these other groups to push back on fertilizer regulations: http://ow.ly/THVR300hEni>
Ag Retailers have sued OSHA over moves to regulate NH3. ...
Ag Retailers have sued OSHA over moves to regulate NH3. http://ow.ly/rVRE300gqwY>
Farmers need to be aware of this and contact their congressional ...
Farmers need to be aware of this and contact their congressional leaders!>
National Ag Statistics Service indicated that the Nations corn crop ...
National Ag Statistics Service indicated that the Nations corn crop is now 70% complete. The Nations soybean crop is now 32% complete. The United States still needs to plant 28.08 million acres of corn and 55.9 million acres of soybeans!>
Two great segments on the economic impact of cooperatives in ...
Two great segments on the economic impact of cooperatives in Nebraska. Cooperative farmer-owners can certainly be proud of their contribution to the economic viability of Nebraska!>
Smith Introduces Bill to Block Unilateral Regs on Fertilizer. ...
Smith Introduces Bill to Block Unilateral Regs on Fertilizer. https://adriansmith.house.gov/press-release/smith-introduces-bill-block-unilateral-regulations-fertilizer-farmers>
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Has the time come to consider mixing higher blends of biofuels with ...
Has the time come to consider mixing higher blends of biofuels with gasoline? What's the best source for that biofuel today? Corn! Follow the link for an informative article! http://ow.ly/co4b300D6vw>
Nebraska Ag Update - May 26, 2016
Nebraska Ag Updates
Late Planting Decisions in 2016
In most areas of the Midwest, planting is very near completion on corn and well along its way for soybeans; however, progress lags in some areas. Weekly progress reports suggest that southern Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio are behind on both corn and soybean plantings. In this article, economic considerations of late plantings are discussed. At this point, soybeans are projected to have higher returns than corn, suggesting that planting soybeans on remaining unplanted acres may be prudent from an economic standpoint. Prevented planting considerations related to crop insurance also are described. Read the entire article here.
Study Finds Consumers Have Wide Knowledge Gap on Genetically Modified Food
While consumers are aware of genetically modified crops and food, their knowledge level is limited and often at odds with the facts, according to a newly published study by a University of Florida researcher. Last year, Brandon McFadden, an assistant professor of food and resource economics at the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, published a study that showed scientific facts scarcely change consumers' impressions of genetically modified food and other organisms. Consumer polls are often cited in policy debates about genetically modified food labeling. This is especially true when discussing whether food that is genetically modified should carry mandatory labels, McFadden said. In conducting their current study, McFadden and his colleague, Jayson Lusk, an agricultural economics professor at Oklahoma State University, wanted to know what data supported consumers' beliefs about genetically modified food and gain a better understanding of preferences for a mandatory label. So he conducted the survey to better understand what consumers know about biotechnology, breeding techniques and label preferences for GM foods. Researchers used an online survey of 1,004 participants that asked questions to measure consumers' knowledge of genetically modified food and organisms. Some of those questions tried to determine objective knowledge of genetically modified organisms, while others aimed to find out consumers' beliefs about genetically modified foods and crops. The results led McFadden to conclude that consumers do not know as much about the facts of genetically modified food and crops as they think they do. Of those sampled, 84 percent supported a mandatory label for food containing genetically modified ingredients. However, 80 percent also supported a mandatory label for food containing DNA, which would result in labeling almost all food. "Our research indicates that the term 'GM' may imply to consumers that genetic modification alters the genetic structure of an organism, while other breeding techniques do not," McFadden said. As participants answered questions designed to measure their knowledge of scientific data on genetic modification, respondents seemed to change their statements about the safety of genetically modified foods, McFadden said. The study is published in the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology Journal. Source: AgriMarketing
2016 Scouting Recommendations for Potato Leafhoppers in Alfalfa
As the first cutting of alfalfa is underway or completed in most of South Dakota, it is important to remember to scout for insect pests that may cause injury to the regrowth of later cuttings. After scouting several alfalfa fields in the last week, it was apparent that potato leafhoppers were present in the majority of the fields, but at low population densities. Potato leafhoppers do not overwinter in South Dakota, and adults must migrate north from the Southern U.S. each spring. Potato leafhoppers are typically more of a concern for later alfalfa cuttings due to their migratory patterns, and other stresses affecting alfalfa later in the season. Although the majority of alfalfa grown is resistant to potato leafhoppers, it is always a good idea to scout and monitor populations. Description Adult potato leafhoppers are approximately 1/8 of an inch in length and elongated with translucent wings that cover their abdomens. The nymphs are slightly smaller, with the largest difference being the absence of wings (Figure 1). However, developing nymphs will have wing pads (incomplete wings). Potato leafhopper adults and nymphs have wide heads, and their bodies gradually narrow to the tip of their abdomens. Potato leafhopper adults are green, and nymphs are generally a lighter shade of green or green-yellow in color. Both the adults and nymphs have specialized hind legs that allow them to jump long distances. Potato leafhoppers have piercing-sucking mouthparts that they use to feed on plants. Plant Injury and Scouting It is necessary to scout fields for both adult and nymph potato leafhoppers, as both life stages are capable of causing injury to the plant. Potato leafhoppers use their piercing-sucking mouthparts to remove fluids from the vascular tissue of the alfalfa plants. They probe the plant with their mouthparts, which disrupts the cells within the leaf causing “hopper burn” (Figure 2). Large populations of potato leafhoppers will cause stunting, and may cause significant losses to the tonnage of the crop. Potato leafhoppers tend to be more of an issue around the edges of fields, and these areas should be targeted during scouting. To scout for the potato leafhoppers, you will need a sweep net. Walk in a “W” or “Z” pattern and swing the net in a 180-degree pendulum swing 30 times. Each of the pendulums (left to right) counts as a single sweep. Count the total number of nymph and adult potato leafhoppers present in the net. Next measure the height of the alfalfa plants. Economic thresholds for alfalfa are based on plant height; 0 to 4 inches tall (Table 1), 4 to 8 inches (Table 2), and 8 to 12 inches (Table 3). Management The potato leafhopper is considered a sporadic pest, and is more likely to be a problem in combination with other abiotic stresses such as drought or heat stress. There are three management recommendations for potato leafhoppers in South Dakota: Plant resistant alfalfa varieties (alfalfa that has glandular hairs or trichomes). The hairs present on the stems and leaves of these varieties prevent the adults from feeding effectively, and the nymphs may become caught and will eventually starve. Cut alfalfa when a potato leafhopper infestation is detected. Although this method is capable of disrupting potato leafhoppers, it forces them to other nearby plants and there is the chance that surviving leafhoppers will re-infest the alfalfa regrowth. Use insecticides to reduce potato leafhopper populations and reduce the chance of injury to developing alfalfa. The economic thresholds for potato leafhoppers are dependent on the value of hay, cost of insecticide application, and the size of the plant; 0 to 4 inches tall (Table 1), 4 to 8 inches tall (Table 2), and 8 to 12 inches tall (Table 3). There are several insecticides available for management when large populations are present on plants that are less than 12 inches tall. A list of insecticides that are currently labeled for potato leafhopper management can be found in the 2016 South Dakota Pest Management Guide: Alfalfa and Oilseeds. View all referenced pictures, figures and tables here. Source: Adam Varenhorst, South Dakota State University Extension
Late-Planted Soybeans Require Slight Management Changes
Warmer temperatures and drying fields means more farmers are out taking advantage of the mild weather to catch up on planting after delays earlier during the season kept many out of their fields. But those growers who still aren’t able to get their soybean crops in before June may need to make slight adjustments to their management plans, says a field crops expert in the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at The Ohio State University. After weather fluctuations during the growing season this year that have included freezing temperatures and snow flurries to sunny, 80-degree days to excess rain and cooler conditions that have left fields too wet to plant, planting is down across much of the region, with many farmers needing to catch up to get their crops in the ground, said Laura Lindsey, a soybean and small grains specialist with Ohio State University Extension. Across Ohio, as of the week ended May 22, only 22 percent of soybeans were planted, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service. That compares to 64 percent that had been planted by the same time last year and 46 percent that had been planted on average during the same time period over the past five years, the agency said. “While some growers in the northern part of the state were able to begin planting due to warmer weather, most growers throughout the rest of the state continued to delay planting as their fields were too wet for planting activities,” Cheryl Turner, Ohio State statistician with the agency, said in a written statement. In general, Ohio soybeans planted between May 1 through mid-May resulted in better yields, according to a study by researchers from OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center. OSU Extension and OARDC are the outreach and research arms, respectively, of the college. But, Lindsey said, it’s not uncommon for some soybean planting to continue into June. “Planting conditions were much worse than usual with the rains experienced last week, while things this week seem to be drying out,” she said. “Thanks to the warmer weather, planting doesn’t look as bleak as it did before. “This weather has really helped a lot. While there are still some wet, poorly drained fields out there, farmers are out planting now, hoping to finish by Memorial Day.” Lindsey said management recommendations don’t really change for growers who get their plants in before June. But those planting into June should increase their seeding rates or even adjust their relative maturity, she said. “For soybeans planted during the first half of June, a seeding rate of 200,000 to 225,000 seeds per acre is recommended,” she said. “When looking at relative maturity, a four-day delay in planting delays physiological maturity about one day, during the first half of June. “As planting is delayed, yield potential goes down, and there is concern about whether late-maturing varieties will mature before the first killing frost. So when planting late, growers should plant the latest-maturing variety that will reach physiological maturity before the first killing frost.” Row spacing is also a consideration, Lindsey said. While growers should plant soybeans in narrow rows, between 7.5 to 15 inches, it’s even more important to adhere to narrow rows when planting in June, she said. “This is so the crops can have adequate canopy closure, which increases light interception, improves weed control by shading out weeds, and helps retain soil moisture,” Lindsey said. While it’s optimal to get soybeans planted in early to mid-May as soil temperature and moisture allows, the planting date is only one part of what determines soybean yields, she said. “Planting is just half the battle – yield really depends on what happens with the weather during the rest of the season,” Lindsey said. “One of the really critical times in terms of yields is during seed fill, which happens in August. “For example, while many soybean plants were stunted during the height of the 2012 drought, the plants were able to partially recover thanks to rainfall in August and September that worked to promote seed fill.” Source: Ohio State University Extension
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Zika Virus and The Clean Water Act
A federal requirement for permits to spray pesticides on water to combat mosquitos would be eliminated under legislation proposed by U.S. House of Representative lawmakers. The legislation is likely to fail, however, as the Obama administration Monday said in a statement it opposes the bill, rebranded last week as the “Zika Vector Control Act.” The bill comes as the president has criticized Congress for now passing funding to prevent more Zika cases in the U.S. The president and Congress have been battling over funding since the beginning of the year. So House leaders repurposed the “Reducing Regulatory Burdens Act” into the Zika Vector Control Act without changing anything in the original bill. The legislation, which has bounced around Congress for years, would eliminate the federal requirements to get a permit to spray pesticides on or near water. This is something agricultural groups have wanted for years. The Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act requires spray applicators to obtain Clean Water Act permits to spray on water to combat mosquitos. Ag interests opposed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency rule because of concerns about the costs to comply and that the requirement would make it difficult to address immediate mosquito concerns. The Zika bill may come to the House floor for a vote this week. It likely is doomed to the veto pen as the Obama administration said in a statement Monday it does not support the legislation, saying it would “weaken” the Clean Water Act, and noting it was just rebranded. “H.R. 897 would weaken environmental protections under the Clean Water Act by exempting pesticide spraying from the currently required pesticide general permit,” the White House stated. “Creating a new statutory exemption to the permit is unnecessary, as it was explicitly crafted to allow immediate responses to declared pest emergencies, thereby allowing vector control methods to be applied to the possible influx of disease-carrying mosquitos.” The White House added that most mosquito-control districts, as well as federal and state agencies, already have authority to apply mosquitocides as needed to respond to the Zika virus without any additional permit. “In rare circumstances where a mosquito control district did not seek prior coverage under the permit, emergency provisions of the permit are available that allow instant authorization to spray without the need for prior notification,” the White House stated. The White House said that “rebranding legislation that removes important Clean Water Act protections for public health and water quality is not an appropriate avenue for addressing the serious threat to the nation that the Zika virus poses.” There is a concern the Zika virus will continue to spread this summer across the United States, predominantly in pregnant women and infants. The World Health Organization has expressed concern countries around the world are not making serious efforts to control mosquitos. Though Democratic lawmakers have pointed to the rebranding of the legislation as a political ploy by House Republicans, supporters say the idea behind the legislation is to eliminate red tape for acquiring spray permits in order to enable health officials and applicators to more quickly respond with mosquito combating efforts. Read the bill here: http://1.usa.gov/… Source: Todd Neeley, DTN Staff Reporter 
Monsanto Rejects Bayer?s Buyout Offer
Monsanto Company has rejected the $62 billion buyout bid from Bayer AG. Monsanto announced today that its Board of Directors unanimously views the Bayer AG buyout proposal “as incomplete and financially inadequate.” But in a press release Monsanto said it is “open to continued and constructive conversations to assess whether a transaction in the best interest of Monsanto shareowners can be achieved.” “We believe in the substantial benefits an integrated strategy could provide to growers and broader society, and we have long respected Bayer’s business,” said Hugh Grant, Monsanto Chairman and CEO. “However, the current proposal significantly undervalues our company and also does not adequately address or provide reassurance for some of the potential financing and regulatory execution risks related to the acquisition.” There is no assurance that any transaction will be entered into or consummated, or on what terms, the release stated and that Monsanto’s board “has not set a timeline for further discussions and Monsanto does not intend to make further comment at this time” Source: AgFax
Tips for a Successful Forage Harvest
Each spring, there’s usually a very long list of things producers need to complete on a timely basis. A couple years ago, I asked several very successful farmers what made the difference between doing very well compared to just getting by, and the answer was pretty uniform across the group. If a producer pays attention to the details for what they’re doing and does things on a timely basis, they will be more successful. That’s great advice! Having priorities from day to day will help farmers be more successful as they go through their lists. The focus of this article is to provide some key management tips for forage producers, based on scientific research, to help them during the growing season. During the winter, Michigan State University Extension and the Michigan Forage Council hosted the 2016 Great Lakes Forage and Grazing Conference. Dan Undersander from the University of Wisconsin presented the keynote address, Advances in Haymaking. His main points are summarized below. Take first cutting by plant height. Producers should measure the height at the top of the plant stem, not the tip of the leaflet. Consider harvesting at 28-29 inches in height to get the best compromise between yield and quality of the crop. Research findings show a daily change of -0.25 percent in crude protein, +0.36 percent in acid detergent fiber and +0.43 percent in neutral detergent fiber as the alfalfa matures. Use the widest swath possible (more than 70 percent of cut area) when cutting for faster drying and higher forage quality. The wide swath provides the best opportunity for alfalfa plants to lose the first 15 percent water as fast as possible. Conditioning is necessary for hay but not haylage. Alfalfa and alfalfa/grass mixtures for hay should be conditioned with a roller conditioner, not a flail conditioner. Reduce the amount of leaf loss in alfalfa. Retaining the most leaves possible has been a long standing recommendation by forage experts. Alfalfa leaves are 15-20 percent neutral detergent fiber whereas the stems are 55-75 percent neutral detergent fiber. Making sure machines are adjusted correctly and the operating speed have the largest effect on reducing leaf loss at harvest. Bale at the proper moisture levels to prevent mold growth and heating in storage. For square bales, the general recommendations are: small squares 19 percent moisture or less, medium square bales (3 feet x 3 feet) less than 16 percent, and for large square bales (4 feet x 4 feet) less than 14 percent moisture. For round bales, the general recommendations are: small rounds (4 feet wide x 5 feet high) less than 18 percent moisture, medium rounds (5 feet wide x 5 feet high) less than 16 percent moisture, and large (5 feet wide x 6 feet high) less than 15 percent moisture. Remove hay/haylage from the field as rapidly as possible to minimize wheel traffic damage. Research shows there is a 6 percent per day reduction in yield of the next cutting for every day the field is driven over after cutting. Wheel tracks will damage the crown buds that produce the next cutting’s growth. Producers that tend to leave bales in the field for several days following baling will sacrifice yield unless they pick up bales immediately. Source: Michigan State University 
New Growing Degree Day Maps on Enviro Weather
One of Michigan State University Enviro-weather’s most used applications, the growing degree-day (GDD) map series, has undergone a transformation in 2016. The format change was spurred partly out of the desire to update the maps, but mostly out of necessity as the technology previously used to produce the maps became obsolete. The GDD maps provide current seasonal accumulated degree-day (base 50) totals across the state as well as departures from normal in terms of GDDs and calendar days. The first map shows total degree-days (base 50) for a specific date. The 2016 version has improved color contrast and clearer numbers and should be easier to read. More than the appearance has changed, however. The source of the data used to produce the maps is also a bit different. The data behind the new colored GDD surfaces are obtained from a new data product series from NOAA National Weather Service called UnRestricted Mesoscale Analysis (URMA). URMA is a collection of gridded weather datasets developed using a combination of numerical model output and available observations, which includes some Enviro-weather station data) The spatial resolution of the data is approximately 1.5 miles, which can provide highly detailed, contoured maps of weather variables and derived variables, such as GDDs, across a region of interest. The Enviro-weather project carried out a lengthy comparative test of the gridded data values versus observed point data and, based on the positive results, has decided to apply the URMA data for our products when it is feasible. While the gridded data values are not quite as precise as the individual station observed data, they can still provide a good estimate of conditions in a given area, especially when there are missing observations or observing sites. In addition to GDD accumulation maps, this Enviro-weather application also provides maps that compare the current degree-day accumulation to the climatological “normal.” There are two comparisons (maps) that can be accessed by clicking on “Current degree-day maps” on an Enviro-weather station page, and scrolling down the page. The first map (top) shows current GDD totals in comparison to normal in terms of number of calendar days ahead or behind. For example, if the current observed GDD total at a given location is 50 units greater than the climate normal and the normal accumulation at that point in the season is 10 GDDs per day, the map will indicate that the GDD totals are 50/10 or five days ahead of normal. The second (bottom) map shows current GDD totals in comparison to normal in terms of GDD units. Both give users a feel for the progress of the growing season compared to what has been observed in the past. It is important to note that the new 2016 version incorporates slightly different data for determining what is “normal.” To calculate “normals” in the old version of this product, climatic data from 1981 to 2007 was used. For the new 2016 version, we have utilized data from 1981-2010, which is the current international standard 30-year period for climatic normals. One final note of caution: Given that the daily GDD normals were calculated with station data from about 90 individual sites within and near the state, which is everything that was available at the time they were developed, the spatial normal GDD patterns may in some cases be less detailed over space than is the case with the new URMA data. As a result, you may see some relatively larger departures from normal that spatially appear to be related to geographical features. In Michigan, this issue is most common in lakeshore areas where air temperatures and GDD totals may vary significantly over only short distances, especially during the spring season when the relatively cool lakes slow accumulation of GDDs. Enviro-weather is working with our new normals database to reduce the risk of this issue and any differences are expected to be relatively small. Source: Michigan State University 
Fungicides ? Apply at Flag Leaf or Wait for Flowering?
Emerging Wheat Diseases With the rains that we’ve had so far throughout the state this spring, moderate levels of some wheat leaf diseases are developing, notably powdery mildew, stripe rust, and tan spot. Some producers are wondering whether to apply a fungicide now that wheat is at flag leaf growth stage, or wait and apply when the wheat is at flowering to manage both the leaf diseases and Fusarium head blight (FHB). When Should You Apply Fungicides? The answer to the question above depends on a number of factors including: the prevalence of disease that is currently being observed on the top wheat leaves, the susceptibility of the cultivar planted, current weather and near future forecast. Fungicide application can be delayed until flowering if the leaf below flag leaf is having no fungal lesions (powdery mildew, tan spot or rust). Fungicides should be applied when 2-3 lesions of powdery mildew and 1-2 of tan spot or Stagonospora blotch are seen on the leaf below flag leaf or rust pustules are seen on the flag leaf. Things to Consider One limitation of applying a fungicide at flag leaf if wet and humid weather occurs during wheat flowering is that there might be a need for another fungicide application to manage FHB. The multiple application of fungicides close to each other may not necessarily be profitable. Moreover, some fungicides are limited in terms of the maximum product (fl oz) that can be applied on a crop in the same season. If there is limited disease pressure at flag leaf growth stage, a fungicide can be delayed and applied at flowering. The flag leaf is the biggest contributor to yield and therefore fungicide application should aim at protecting this leaf. Research done by Wiersma and Motteberg at the University of Minnesota indicated that delaying a fungicide application until flowering did not compromise control of fungal leaf disease or yield in 8 spring wheat cultivars. Research done at South Dakota State University also indicated limited differences in yield for plots that received a fungicide at flag leaf and those at flowering. In Summary In summary, scout to determine the level of disease at flag leaf growth stage; if the flag leaf and the leaf below flag leaf are relatively free of fungal diseases, consider delaying fungicide application until flowering. Source: Emmanuel Byamukama and Dalitso Yabwalo, South Dakota State University 
Will Summer Pricing Opportunities Materialize for Corn and Soybeans?
Following increases over the past two to three months, corn and soybean prices have traded in a choppy pattern over the past week. Prices have incorporated the information in the USDA’s May 10 World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) report that pointed to larger consumption and smaller stocks than expected for both the 2015-16 and 2016-17 marketing years. According to a University of Illinois agricultural economist, a number of factors continue to percolate in these markets. One of these factors is the actual size of the 2016 corn and soybean crops in South America and the impact on export demand for U.S. crops. “Weekly export sales of both crops continue to be larger than needed to reach the USDA’s most recent export projection for the year,” says Darrel Good. “After adjusting the cumulative marketing-year export estimate in the USDA’s Export Sales report by Census export estimates, new sales of corn need to average only about 7 million bushels per week to reach the export projection of 1.725 billion bushels. New sales averaged 51.5 million bushels per week for the six weeks that ended May 12. After adjusting for Census export estimates, export sales of soybeans already exceed the marketing-year export projection of 1.74 billion bushels by 36 million bushels.” A second factor creating uncertainty in the corn and soybean markets is the magnitude of planted acreage in the United States. The USDA’s March 31 Prospective Plantings report revealed producer intentions to plant 93.601 million acres of corn and 82.236 million acres of soybeans this year. Intentions reflect an increase of 5.6 million acres for corn and a decrease of 414,000 acres for soybeans compared to the final estimate of planted acreage last year. “The planted acreage of each crop and the total acreage of both crops always deviates from the planting intentions estimates,” Good says. “Over the past 20 years, when producers planting intentions were not directly impacted by farm program provisions, the final estimate of soybean planted acreage has exceeded March intentions in 10 years and was less than intentions in 10 years. For corn, the final estimate exceeded intentions in seven years and was less than intentions in 13 years. Total acreage of corn and soybeans exceeded intentions in 10 years and was less than intentions in 10 years. History does not provide a strong signal for what to expect this year. However, the recent strength in soybean prices relative to corn prices and the slow corn-planting pace in the eastern Corn Belt suggest that some intended corn acreage will be switched to soybeans. In addition, without widespread prevent-planted acreage, total corn and soybean acreage may exceed intentions. It now appears that soybean acreage will exceed intentions, but the prospects for corn acreage are less clear.” Good says the largest uncertainty in both markets is the likely level of yields. “At this stage of the growing season, there is little indication of how the U.S. average yields may deviate from trend values, estimated by USDA at 168 bushels for corn and 47.6 bushels for soybeans,” Good says. “We continue to believe there is a higher-than-normal risk of yields falling below trend value due to the history of warmer, drier summers following extremely warm winters. That risk may also be elevated by the rapidly fading El Nino event. If this assessment is correct, higher corn and soybean prices would be expected this summer, providing a better opportunity for pricing 2016 production.” According to Good, the risk of waiting for a summer price rally before aggressively pricing the 2016 crops is probably larger for soybeans than for corn for several reasons. 1) Soybean acreage is likely to exceed intentions so that production could still be large even with a modest shortfall in yields. 2) Soybean yields may be less vulnerable to stressful summer weather than corn yields. 3) Soybean prices have increased more than corn prices in recent weeks and are now at a relatively high level compared to corn prices. 4) November 2016 soybean futures are now trading near $10.40, above the spring price guarantee of $9.73 for crop revenue insurance. 5) With trend yields, current new-crop soybean prices are high enough to generate positive returns to owner-operators, those with crop share rents, and those with modest cash rents. In contrast, Good says corn acreage may be less than intentions, yields are more vulnerable to adverse summer weather, recent price strength has been modest, and December 2016 futures are currently trading only modestly above the spring price guarantee of $3.86 for crop revenue insurance. “While waiting for a price that offers a positive return has some risk, the risk seems limited over the next several weeks,” Good says. If a summer price rally does occur, Good says producers will likely want to aggressively price the 2016 crop. “History suggests that a weather market would also result in opportunities for pricing 2017 crops and beyond. A weather market would likely result in smaller price increases for those crops than for the 2015 and 2016 crops, similar to the recent price pattern. From the close on March 31 to the close on May 20, July 2016 corn futures gained almost 39 cents, while December 2016 and December 2017 futures gained 31 cents and 24 cents, respectively. From the close on March 1, July 2016 soybean futures gained $2.10, while November 2016 and November 2017 futures gained $1.79 and 88 cents, respectively. Still, prices for those deferred crops could move to levels reflecting positive returns for most producers. How aggressively to price multiple crops depends on the magnitude of the price rally, should it occur.” Source: Darrel Good and Debra Levey Larson, University of Illinois 
PPRI gives public tour of Sherman Ranch
Prairie Plains Resource Institute welcomed more than 20 visitors to the newly acquired Sherman Ranch Thursday as one of its first attempts to offer a tour of the 650-acre spread.Executive director Bill Whitney and publications editor and SOAR Coordinator Jan Whitney brought the tour group out to get a look of some of the recent changes made since PPRI purchased the scenic property.Read more in this week's print or e-editions. Rate this article:  Select ratingGive PPRI gives public tour of Sherman Ranch 1/5Give PPRI gives public tour of Sherman Ranch 2/5Give PPRI gives public tour of Sherman Ranch 3/5Give PPRI gives public tour of Sherman Ranch 4/5Give PPRI gives public tour of Sherman Ranch 5/5 No votes yet
Nebraska Ag Update - May 24, 2016
Nebraska Ag Updates
National
Livestock futures close higher
A light to moderate cattle trade developed in parts of cattle country with the best test evident in Kansas and Texas. With most sales at 125.00, the Southern live trade is nearly $6.00 lower than last week. Asking prices on unsold cattle appears to be around 128.00 plus in the South, and 200.00 plus in the North. The kill totaled 113,000 head, the same as last week, but 1,000 smaller than a year ago. Boxed beef cutout values were lower on light to moderate demand and offerings. Choice beef was down .85 at 222.72, and select was 1.82 lower at 203.26. Chicago Mercantile Exchange live cattle contracts settled 77 to 195 points higher. The market wavered in a wide price range and volume remained rather light. The August through the December contracts saw the most support and markets traded in a narrow trading range for much of the session. Feeder cattle settled 42 to 272 points higher and like the live cattle trade there were wide price swings as light trade volume was seen. The ability to bring buyers back to the market following the early triple digit losses seen through the morning trade created some follow through momentum that could be carried into the holiday weekend. Feeder cattle receipts at the Springfield, Missouri Livestock Marketing Center totaled 1616 head on Wednesday. Compared to the previous week, steers sold 3.00 to 8.00 lower with heifers 6.00 to 8.00 lower, spots up to 12.00 lower. Feeder steers medium and large 1 averaging 614 pounds brought 159.06 per hundredweight. 521 pound heifers averaged 141.38. Lean hogs settled 25 to 157 higher as strong gains quickly developed through the lean market, pushing nearby contracts back above the $80.00 price level. This gave the entire complex a sense of momentum as traders remained focused on additional buyer interest over the market. Barrows and gilts in the Iowa/Minnesota direct trade closed .28 lower at 73.56 weighted average on a carcass basis, the West was down .37 at 73.40, and nationally the market was 1.82 lower at 72.74. Missouri direct base carcass meat price is steady from 64.00 to 68.00. Midwest hogs on a live basis are lightly tested, steady from 47.00 to 50.00. The pork carcass cutout value was down 1.46 at 83.57 FOB plant. For the week ending May 21, Iowa barrows and gilts averaged 289.2 pounds, .4 pounds lighter than the previous week, and 2.5 pounds heavier than 2015. The seasonal trend toward lighter weights should persist for another 30 to 45 days. The hog slaughter was estimated at 428,000 head, 32,000 more than last week, and 18,000 greater than last year. The post Livestock futures close higher appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
GIPSA rule would cost pork industry millions
The National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) says implementation of the GIPSA rule would be devastating to the pork industry. NPPC past-president Dr. Howard Hill told a Senate Agriculture subcommittee hearing last week that a 2010 study by Informa Economics found the Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Act would?ve cost the pork industry more than $350 million annually. ?Tens of thousands of comments, including 16,000 from the pork producers, were filed in opposition to the rule.? And Congress several times included riders in the USDA?s annual appropriation bill to prevent it from finalizing the regulation.? Hill says USDA did not include any such amendment in its Fiscal 2016 Bill. In a statement to Brownfield, the agency says the rule would ensure fair treatment of livestock and poultry growers and any efforts to block it are not acceptable to the Obama Administration. ? http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Howard-Hill-5-26-16.mp3? ? The post GIPSA rule would cost pork industry millions appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Consumer voices will matter in livestock production
An animal care and welfare specialist says the attitudes consumers have towards the way livestock raised for production are treated is changing. University of Calgary?s Ed Pajor says the ?humanization? of animals has created additional challenges for the nation?s livestock producers. But, he says producers today better understand the needs of animals than they ever have before.? ?I think it is important that we don?t think of animals as furry little people,? he says.? ?We need to understand animals need and provide those things to animals.? The industry historically just did not have that question in mind.? It?s not that anybody was trying to be cruel ? it was more of a case of not understanding the needs of the animal.? He tells Brownfield moving forward the industry will need to increase transparency to survive. But Pajor says beyond that ? the industry is going to have to listen to what consumers are telling them they want.? ?We have to be understanding of where the consumers are coming from,? he says.? ?They are the ones that are purchasing the product.? If they want to have specific programs in place and want to see things done a certain way ? if there are enough retailers interested the industry is going to likely bend to those wishes and desires.? Pajor spoke at the recent Center for Animal Welfare Science symposium at Purdue University. AUDIO: Ed Pajor, University of Calgary http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/PajorEd_CalgaryU.mp3 The post Consumer voices will matter in livestock production appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Corn hits new highs
Soybeans were mostly lower on profit taking and technical selling with July 2016 through January 2017 posting modest losses. Contracts consolidated after hitting new highs for the move overnight heading into Thursday?s session. July traded as high as $10.98 prior to pulling back. The weekly export sales and shipments were neutral. Soybean meal closed higher on commercial demand and bean oil was lower on the adjustment of product spreads. Meal hit new eighteen month highs before backing off. According to the International Grains Council, 2016/17 global soybean production is seen at 320 million tons, 1 million more than the last guess. New estimates out of Argentina have soybean losses at 4 million to 8 million tons following widespread flooding. Corn was higher on commercial and technical buying, hitting new seven month highs and breaking out of its recent range. Weekly export numbers were bullish and Taiwan and unknown destinations both bought U.S. corn. Taiwan bought 130,000 tons, 65,000 each for this marketing year and next marketing year, and unknown picked up 123,000 tons for 2015/16 delivery. Contracts were down early, but rallied with renewed gains in soybean meal. Ethanol futures were mixed. The International Grains Council now has world new crop corn production at 1.003 billion tons, up 500 million from the previous projection. The wheat complex was higher on commercial and technical buying. The weekly export numbers were bearish and so are the fundamentals, but wheat?s still able to generate buying interest. The trade?s also watching weather in the Plains with rain in Texas and potential damage across the Plains from severe weather. The International Grains Council sees global wheat production in 2016/17 at 722 million tons, compared to 717 million in the prior estimate. ?SovEcon estimates 2016 wheat production for Russia at 64 million tons, which would be the largest since the end of the Soviet Union. Grain exports are projected at a record 35 million tons, including 25 million tons of wheat. Argentina?s Rural Society firm expects a 30% increase in wheat acreage citing friendlier trade policies. Japan bought 65,000 tons of U.S. food wheat, along with 30,000 tons each from Australia and Canada. The post Corn hits new highs appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Agriculture Secretary Vilsack to Make First Official Visit to Puerto Rico
WASHINGTON, May 26, 2016 - Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack will make his first official visit to Puerto Rico where he will highlight the U.S. Department of Agriculture's ongoing commitment to addressing food security and rural opportunity in the Commonwealth.
Cattle disease continues to spread into Midwest
Photo courtesy Blair Fannin, Texas A&M AgriLife Research The blood disease of cattle called anaplasmosis continues to spread from southern and western areas of the U.S. into the Midwest. Dr. Gregg Hanzlicek with the veterinary diagnostic lab at Kansas State University, says the disease causes severe and potentially fatal anemia in cattle. ?For herds that are negative?like so many of our bovine diseases?the best thing, if they?re bringing animals from the outside in, is to have them tested before they bring them in. There are two really good, inexpensive blood tests that can be used,? Hanzlicek says. ?So that?s number one?don?t purchase the disease.? Hanzlicek says once the disease is in a herd, it?is?spread through blood transfer, typically from ticks, flies or multi-use injection needles. AUDIO: Dr. Gregg Hanzlicek http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/hanzlicek-gregg-anaplasmosis-160525.mp3 The post Cattle disease continues to spread into Midwest appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
U.S. unprepared for foreign animal disease outbreak
A pork industry leader says the U.S. needs to be better prepared to handle a foreign animal disease outbreak. On Thursday, past president of the National Pork Producers Council (NPPC) Dr. Howard Hill told a Senate Agriculture subcommittee hearing on livestock that foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) poses a serious threat to hog farmers. ?USDA and the livestock industry has been working on a plan to combat an outbreak, but the only practical way is through the use of vaccination.? Unfortunately we currently don?t have the ability to produce the number of doses needed for an initial outbreak, or the capacity to produce more vaccine.? Consistent with a Homeland Security presidential directive, Hill says an adequate FMD vaccine bank must be established. ?This would require an off-shore vendor-maintained bank that would have available anigen concentrate to produce against all 23 of the most common foot-and-mouth disease types currently circulating in the world.? The pork industry is also calling for a vendor-managed inventory of 10 million doses, which Hill says is the estimated need during the first two weeks of an FMD outbreak. He also told lawmakers a contract with an international vaccine manufacturer with the surge capacity of at least 40 million additional doses is necessary. ? http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Howard-Hill-5-26-16.mp3? ? ? ? The post U.S. unprepared for foreign animal disease outbreak appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Prestage Foods evaluating other pork plant sites
Prestage Foods of Iowa continues to evaluate sites for its proposed pork processing plant. Prestage spokesperson Summer Lanier tells Brownfield they met recently with officials in Franklin County in north-central Iowa. ?We are in the process of evaluating other sites in both Iowa and the adjoining states, and Franklin County is just one of many sites that are part of that search and evaluation process,? Lanier says. Karen Mitchell of the Franklin County Development Association says county officials requested the meeting with Prestage. She says they wanted to discuss plant specifics and what would be required from the company and county to make such a project viable. Earlier this month, the Mason City, Iowa city council rejected plans for the plant. Prestage officials say it will employ as many as two-thousand people. The post Prestage Foods evaluating other pork plant sites appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Knowledge and beliefs on GMOs vary
A new study says consumers don?t know as much about the facts of GMOs as they think. Conducted by researchers at the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and Oklahoma State University, the consumer poll asked questions to measure consumers? knowledge of genetically modified food. The study found after answering a list of questions testing objective knowledge of GM food, subjective, self-reported knowledge declines somewhat and beliefs about GM food safety increase slightly. Researchers say 84 percent of those surveyed supported a mandatory GMO food label, while 80 percent of respondents also supported a mandatory label for food containing DNA.? Nearly all food contains DNA. ? The post Knowledge and beliefs on GMOs vary appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
House Republicans look to cut funding for EPA
A funding bill released by House Republicans looks to cut regulatory funding for the Environmental Protection Agency.? The cuts to the Interior Department budget would block key Obama administration rules. According to The Hill, the committee is targeting the agency?s regulatory agenda by cutting EPA?s budget by $164 million. Several of the administration?s environmental rules, including regulating methane emissions and defining bodies of water under the agency?s purview, would also be block. The proposed budget cut is significantly smaller than last year, when the committee looked to slash the agency?s budget by more than $700 million. The post House Republicans look to cut funding for EPA appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Midday cash livestock markets
A few cattle sales are being reported by USDA Mandatory in parts of Kansas at 125.00, $5.00 to 7.00 lower than last week. Following another round of light trade that was reported in Nebraska yesterday with a wide range of 190.00 to 195.00. Asking prices today are around 128.00 to 132.00 in the South, and 200.00 to 205.00 in the North. Boxed beef cutout values are mixed with the choice up .51 at 224.08, and select down .98 at 204.10. Feeder cattle receipts at the Springfield, Missouri Livestock Marketing Center totaled 1616 head on Wednesday. Compared to the previous week, steers sold 3.00 to 8.00 lower with heifers 6.00 to 8.00 lower, spots up to 12.00 lower. Feeder steers medium and large 1 averaging 614 pounds brought 159.06 per hundredweight. 521 pound heifers averaged 141.38. Sheep rece3ipts at the Kalona, Iowa auction totaled 613 head on Wednesday. Compared to the sale two weeks ago, slaughter lambs with the bulk of the offering under 100 pounds were 5.00 to 15.00 lower. There were no feeder lambs two weeks ago for a market comparison. Trade was active with good demand. Slaughter lambs wooled choice and prime 2-3 weighing 75 pounds brought 160.53 per hundredweight. Feeder lambs weighing 57 pounds traded at 203.49 per hundredweight. Barrows and gilts in the Iowa/Minnesota direct trade are not reported due to confidentiality. The five day rolling average is 72.31. Western trade is also not reported and the rolling average is 74.65. Nationally the hog market is 1.13 lower at 72.31. Missouri direct base carcass meat price is steady from 64.00 to 68.00. Midwest hogs on a live basis are lightly tested, steady from 47.00 to 50.00. The pork carcass cutout value is down 2.06 at 82.97 FOB plant. All primal cuts are lower with ribs and loins both over $4.00 lower. For the week ending May 21, Iowa barrows and gilts averaged 289.2 pounds, .4 pounds lighter than the previous week, and 2.5 pounds heavier than 2015. The seasonal trend toward lighter weights should persist for another 30 to 45 days. The post Midday cash livestock markets appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Farm Credit institutions consider merger
Three major farm credit institutions in the Midwest are considering joining forces. In a joint release, the board of directors for Minnesota-based AgStar Financial Services, Badgerland Financial in Wisconsin and 1st Farm Credit Services of Illinois say the combined cooperatives would create the nation?s third-largest farm credit group. While the CEO?s of the three companies says the associations share the same values and commitment to agriculture, they will continue to evaluate collaborative options. Board members say there is no exact timetable for a merger, but it could happen by April 2017. ? The post Farm Credit institutions consider merger appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Worker safety improving in meat and poultry processing
A new report shows employee safety continues to improve at meat and poultry slaughtering and processing facilities. The Government Accountability Office says injury and illness rates from 2004 to 2013 significantly declined.? Meat workers had higher rates of injuries and illnesses when compared to poultry workers. Hazardous conditions for workers include tasks associated with musculoskeletal disorders, exposure to chemicals and pathogens, and traumatic injuries from machines and tools. The North American Meat Institute says worker safety is a priority for the industry and along with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration they have continued to improve safety guidelines. The post Worker safety improving in meat and poultry processing appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
NTF has 2 GMO labeling stipulations
The National Turkey Federation (NTF) is actively supporting two critical components of any GMO labeling bill coming from Congress, so says board director John Zimmerman of Minnesota. ?One, that the bill maintains federal preemption for meat and poultry labeling.? And two, that it insures animals that are fed genetically engineered feed should not have to be labeled GE.? ?During a House Agriculture subcommittee hearing Tuesday, he told lawmakers a patchwork of state rules would create labeling nightmares for food producers. The Senate Ag Committee continues to deliberate on a uniform food labeling solution as Vermont?s GMO law is scheduled to go into effect July 1st. ? http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/zimmerman-jordan-turkey-fed-testimony-160524.mp3? ? ? ? ? The post NTF has 2 GMO labeling stipulations appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Market volatility emphasizes need for risk management
Extreme volatility in the livestock markets emphasize the importance of risk management tools available to producers through the Farm Bill. In 2009 the livestock industry hit the lowest of lows and then in 2014 rebound to see record profits.? University of Missouri extension specialist Scott Brown the availability of protection programs will be vital for the long-term survival of livestock producers. AUDIO: Managing For Profit, Scott Brown http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/0525MFP.mp3 The post Market volatility emphasizes need for risk management appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
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