@C - CORN - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
May '17 358'6 356'6 357'4 -1'0
Jul '17 366'2 364'2 365'0 -1'0
Sep '17 373'4 371'4 372'4 -0'6
Dec '17 382'0 380'0 381'2 -0'6
Mar '18 391'4 389'6 390'2 -1'2
May '18 396'6 395'0 395'6 -1'2
@S - SOYBEANS - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
May '17 970'0 961'0 962'6 -6'2
Jul '17 980'4 971'2 973'0 -6'4
Aug '17 982'2 973'4 975'2 -6'2
Sep '17 974'2 965'6 968'2 -5'2
Nov '17 969'0 960'6 963'2 -4'6
Jan '18 973'4 967'0 968'6 -4'6
Mar '18 975'0 968'4 971'0 -5'0
@K - HARD RED WINTER WHEAT - KCBT
Month High Low Last Chg
May '17 424'6 417'0 417'0 -6'4
Jul '17 437'4 430'2 430'2 -6'2
Sep '17 452'2 445'2 445'2 -6'2
Dec '17 475'0 468'6 469'0 -5'2
@L - LIVE CATTLE - CME
Month High Low Last Chg
Apr '17 121.000 119.525 120.000 -1.350
Jun '17 111.600 110.175 110.875 -0.975
@C - COTTON #2 - ICEFU
Month High Low Last Chg
May '17 76.54 76.10 76.24 0.10
Jul '17 77.90 77.48 77.60 -0.03
Oct '17 74.26 74.16 74.16 -0.56
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Local
Is Alfalfa Replant Necessary?
Winter injury and kill of alfalfa are the main concerns on forage producers’ minds this time of year, explained Karla Hernandez, SDSU Extension Forages Field Specialist. Six factors which contribute to winter-kill include: 1. Stand age: older stands are more likely to winterkill than younger plants. 2. Soil pH: soils with a pH above 6.6 are less likely to experience winter injury. 3. Soil fertility: stands planted in soils with high natural fertility are less likely to experience winter injury than those with low fertility. 4. Variety: Alfalfa varieties with superior winter hardiness ratings and a high disease resistance index are less likely to experience winter injury. 5. Cutting management: Harvest frequency and timing of fall cutting will affect alfalfa winter hardiness. “The general trend shows that the shorter the interval between cuttings during the growing season, the greater risk of winter injury,” Hernandez said. An aggressive harvest schedule prevents the plant from storing carbohydrates in its root structure which it will need to maintain health as it regrows. Stands in which last cutting is taken between September 1 and middle of October are at greatest risk, as plants did not have enough time to accumulate adequate carbohydrate levels in the root system before winter. 6. Snow cover: Snow provides insulation to the plants and the crown. “The crucial temperature region is 2-to 4-inches below the soil surface where a large part of the root structure is located,” she said. Stands that have at least 6-inches of stubble left will be able to retain more snow cover and be less susceptible to winter injury. If your stand is impacted by the above conditions, Hernandez said scouting is necessary to clearly understand whether replant is necessary. “Begin by looking to see which stands which are slow to green up this spring,” Hernandez said. She encouraged growers to compare their stand to other fields in the area. “If you notice some areas are starting to grow and other areas of your alfalfa field still brown, it is time to check those brown stands for injury or death,” she said. Examin the roots: Winter-killed roots will have a gray appearance. “If the root is soft and water can be easily squeezed from it, or it has a brown color, it is a possible sign of winter cold-related death,” Hernandez said. Compare shoots: Asymmetrical growth and uneven growth are also two indicators of winter injury. “Compare the shoots on the same plant, and if you notice that one set of shoots seems to be drastically outperforming another in terms of growth, it could be that winter cold damaged the bud structure of your plants,” Hernandez said. If a grower thinks their stands have been injured, Hernandez outlines guideline in Table 1 to help decide whether to keep or replant the stand. Source: Karla Hernandez, South Dakota State University Extension
National
Purdue Soybean Showcase
Brownfield will be on the ground for the Purdue Soybean Showcase July 27, 2017 in West Lafayette, IN Continue reading Purdue Soybean Showcase at Brownfield Ag News.      
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Great article on how to control marestail with spring burndown ...
Great article on how to control marestail with spring burndown practices>
Aurora Cooperative and RANEK AG Announce New Partnership Aurora, ...
Aurora Cooperative and RANEK AG Announce New Partnership Aurora, Neb. ? Aurora Cooperative, a leading independent cooperative with 80 locations in seven states, and RANEK AG, a progressive local agronomy supplier with two locations in South Dakota, are excited to announce a new partnership between the two existing companies. Aurora Cooperative and RANEK AG have combined its resources to provide high quality, competitive products and services to its farmer-owners who rely on them every day. ?Aurora Cooperative is a company on the leading edge of innovation,? said Justin Ranek, Area Manager of RANEK AG, a division of Aurora Cooperative. ?What Aurora Cooperative brings to the table is commitment to not only understanding today?s problems but to provide profitable, forward-thinking solutions that will positively affect our growers? profitability.? ?We are truly pleased to be involved with RANEK AG in a new South Dakota agronomy division,? said Aurora Cooperative CEO Chris Vincent. ?This great opportunity allows us to partner with the Ranek family and the progressive South Dakota farmer. Raneks are great South Dakotans, and we are looking forward to working with them and their customers.?>
For growers seeking perfect emergence because you know it affects ...
For growers seeking perfect emergence because you know it affects yield, choose Aurora?s Gold Grow Plan so you can have the confidence that your seeds will emerge together and win together. To learn more about the plan click here: http://auroracoop.com/img/pdf/GROW%20program%20--%20Emergence.pdf>
Congratulations to this month's winner Gabe Bathen out of York! Gabe ...
Congratulations to this month's winner Gabe Bathen out of York! Gabe was nominated because of his loyalty, leadership, and passion here at work; but also his caring, supportive nature for his wife and kids at home.>
Happy #NationalAgDay to our farmer-owners! We are proud to work ...
Happy #NationalAgDay to our farmer-owners! We are proud to work alongside you and we admire your hard work and your passion for agriculture!>
Mark McHargue from Central City asked Senator Ben Sasse about trades ...
Mark McHargue from Central City asked Senator Ben Sasse about trades and exports during the town hall meeting today held at the corporate office in Aurora.>
Senator Sasse is currently speaking and taking questions at the town ...
Senator Sasse is currently speaking and taking questions at the town hall that is being hosted at Aurora Cooperative's corporate office.>
Senator Sasse will be hosting a town hall meeting tomorrow at 3 p.m. ...
Senator Sasse will be hosting a town hall meeting tomorrow at 3 p.m. at our corporate office in Aurora. The event is open to the public.>
They have lost many of their acres, their livestock and for some ...
They have lost many of their acres, their livestock and for some their homes. Our hearts go out to those affected by the recent fires. Our St. Paul location donated some fencing supplies to the cause today! Thank you Nebraska Strong Disaster Relief for allowing us to be a part of this tremendous service you are doing.>
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"We do this to make sure the farmers are getting the best possible ...
"We do this to make sure the farmers are getting the best possible service we can give to them." --James Jensen, ag aviation department head. Great article about our aerial team out at Traudt Aerial!>
Homegrown, reliable fuel comes full circle ? from the field to the ...
Homegrown, reliable fuel comes full circle ? from the field to the tank. Anyone filling up their tanks with an ethanol-blended gasoline at an Aurora Cooperative fuel pump will now be using local ethanol from Pacific Aurora, LLC. Aurora Cooperative believes in putting its owners? equity to work for your farm, your cooperative, your future and now for your ethanol.>
U.S. Senator Deb Fischer was one of three senators who introduced a ...
U.S. Senator Deb Fischer was one of three senators who introduced a bill into Congress on March 2 that if passed would extend the Reid vapor pressure (RVP) waiver to ethanol blends above 10 percent.>
Aurora Cooperative employees Rod Perry and Brent Janda held an ...
Aurora Cooperative employees Rod Perry and Brent Janda held an information meeting about anhydrous ammonia safety with the Aurora Volunteer Fire Dept. With the busy spring season right around the corner, we wanted to help our dedicated first responders keep our farmers and communities safe.>
Don't miss out on this month's deals at the Aurora Service Center!
Don't miss out on this month's deals at the Aurora Service Center!>
Local
Is Alfalfa Replant Necessary?
Winter injury and kill of alfalfa are the main concerns on forage producers’ minds this time of year, explained Karla Hernandez, SDSU Extension Forages Field Specialist. Six factors which contribute to winter-kill include: 1. Stand age: older stands are more likely to winterkill than younger plants. 2. Soil pH: soils with a pH above 6.6 are less likely to experience winter injury. 3. Soil fertility: stands planted in soils with high natural fertility are less likely to experience winter injury than those with low fertility. 4. Variety: Alfalfa varieties with superior winter hardiness ratings and a high disease resistance index are less likely to experience winter injury. 5. Cutting management: Harvest frequency and timing of fall cutting will affect alfalfa winter hardiness. “The general trend shows that the shorter the interval between cuttings during the growing season, the greater risk of winter injury,” Hernandez said. An aggressive harvest schedule prevents the plant from storing carbohydrates in its root structure which it will need to maintain health as it regrows. Stands in which last cutting is taken between September 1 and middle of October are at greatest risk, as plants did not have enough time to accumulate adequate carbohydrate levels in the root system before winter. 6. Snow cover: Snow provides insulation to the plants and the crown. “The crucial temperature region is 2-to 4-inches below the soil surface where a large part of the root structure is located,” she said. Stands that have at least 6-inches of stubble left will be able to retain more snow cover and be less susceptible to winter injury. If your stand is impacted by the above conditions, Hernandez said scouting is necessary to clearly understand whether replant is necessary. “Begin by looking to see which stands which are slow to green up this spring,” Hernandez said. She encouraged growers to compare their stand to other fields in the area. “If you notice some areas are starting to grow and other areas of your alfalfa field still brown, it is time to check those brown stands for injury or death,” she said. Examin the roots: Winter-killed roots will have a gray appearance. “If the root is soft and water can be easily squeezed from it, or it has a brown color, it is a possible sign of winter cold-related death,” Hernandez said. Compare shoots: Asymmetrical growth and uneven growth are also two indicators of winter injury. “Compare the shoots on the same plant, and if you notice that one set of shoots seems to be drastically outperforming another in terms of growth, it could be that winter cold damaged the bud structure of your plants,” Hernandez said. If a grower thinks their stands have been injured, Hernandez outlines guideline in Table 1 to help decide whether to keep or replant the stand. Source: Karla Hernandez, South Dakota State University Extension
Recommendations for Planting Large Soybean Seed
Soybean seed quality is very good this year. Mechanical damage to the seed coats or embryos is very low because the seed was harvested at nearly ideal moisture levels. However, some of the seed is quite large at 2,100 to 2,400 seeds per pound. Seed size within a given variety can vary by as much as 20 percent and is determined by the environmental conditions occurring during the growing season. The abundant precipitation that occurred in August and early September favored the production of larger seed in 2016. For a given variety, the size of the seed planted does not affect the yield potential as long as seed quality is high. However, the large seed may cause some management challenges for producers. Understanding these challenges and the strategies for overcoming them will improve seed performance in 2017. The first step is to determine the size of the seed for each of your seed lots. The next step is to seek information from your operator’s manual, seed supplier and equipment dealer about equipping and setting your planter or drill to handle this year’s seed sizes. Taking these steps now will prevent problems at planting. Large seed (2,400 seeds per pound or less) can be damaged by the fluted metering system in drills. This type of damage can be reduced by plugging every other feed cup and opening up the seed metering gates. Some drills allow the feed cup to be lowered, increasing the space between the fluted seed metering mechanism and the bottom of the feed cup. Check your operator’s manual for specific recommendations. Another potential concern with large seed is that the seed may have enlarged so quickly last summer that it caused growth cracks in the seed coats. This is not a problem in 2017. Large seed produces larger cotyledons (seed leaves) than small seed. The larger cotyledons are more difficult to lift out of the soil during emergence. This may cause emergence problems on fine-textured soils prone to crusting. Planting the seed in wide rows and increasing the planting rate slightly is usually beneficial as the seeds are spaced closely enough within the row to crack the crust. Also, consider planting slightly shallower and maintain residue cover over the row. In some cases, a timely rotary hoeing may be required to break the crust. Please see the Michigan State University Extension article “Improving soybean emergence on soils prone to crusting.” The loss of one cotyledon on a few plants during emergence will not affect yield. However, if a large percentage of plants lose one or both cotyledons, yields will be significantly reduced. All soybean seed must imbibe 50 percent of its weight in water during germination. Large soybean seed must imbibe more water to germinate than small seed. This may lead to delayed or uneven emergence under marginal soil moisture conditions. Most agronomists recommend planting soybean seed into at least 0.5 inches of moist soil to promote uniform germination and emergence. This recommendation is even more important with large soybean seed. This article was produced by the SMaRT project (Soybean Management and Research Technology). The SMaRT project was developed to help Michigan producers increase soybean yields and farm profitability. SMaRT is a partnership between MSU Extension and the Michigan Soybean Checkoff program. Source: Mike Staton, Michigan State University Extension
Judge Upholds Farmers' Privacy
The American Farm Bureau Federation and the National Pork Producers Council yesterday closed the final chapter of their lawsuit challenging EPA’s release of farmer and rancher personal information, when a federal judge approved a settlement that secures the private information of thousands of livestock and poultry farmers in 36 states. “This lawsuit has won a major victory for personal privacy,” said American Farm Bureau Federation President Zippy Duvall. “Months ago, we won a court decision that vindicates the rights of farmers and all Americans to protect their personal information from dissemination by the government. This settlement is the final step, requiring that EPA scrub all personal information from the records involved and train its staff on the proper handling of personal information.” AFBF and NPPC filed the lawsuit in 2013 after EPA released a vast compilation of spreadsheets containing personal information about farmers and ranchers in 29 states who raise livestock and poultry, in some cases including the names of farmers, ranchers and sometimes other family members, home addresses, email addresses, GPS coordinates and telephone numbers. EPA was poised at that time to release more spreadsheets containing similar information on farmers in an additional six states. “Farm families usually live on the farm and releasing this type of information was a clear violation of their personal privacy,” Duvall said. “The information could easily be used to encourage harassment or even violence against farmers and ranchers.” The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit ruled last September that EPA abused its discretion by handing the FOIA requestors a “complete set of data on a silver platter … whatever their motives might be.” The court of appeals then sent the case back to the federal district court in Minnesota to decide whether to issue an injunction ordering EPA not to release the personal information. The settlement agreement, reached with current EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, eliminates the need for a court order by spelling out exactly what information can remain in the spreadsheets released by the agency: only the city, county, zip code and permit status of an operation will be released. The agreement also requires EPA to conduct training on FOIA, personal information and the Privacy Act. Source: Morning Ag Clips
3 Corn Concerns for 2017
Getting anxious about planting season? It will soon be here. Here are factors to keep in mind for 2017. Watch for Corn Rootworm Tight economics have prompted farmers to trim seed costs by foregoing traits, such as those that resist corn rootworm. Stronger Together “As an industry, we have been so focused on price,” says Jeff Hartz, director of marketing for Wyffels Hybrids. “But that might be setting us up for more risk.” Although there have been isolated incidents of corn rootworm infestations, this pest has largely been absent in recent years. “One thing that mitigates this is that there are more rotated corn acres with soybeans,” says Hartz. Still, this pest has a track record of bouncing back when it’s least expected. Keep your guard up via scouting fields this summer, says Hartz. Watch Corn Maturities “In our research, we’ve seen more disparity between labeled and actual maturities,” says Hartz. “We’ve seen hybrids labeled as 112-day, for instance, but they act much more like a 114-day maturity hybrid. This creates a yield advantage when compared to a true 112-day hybrid.” What to do? “Farmers just need to be careful,” Hartz says. “A grower may be attempting to strategically spread risk by planting different maturities. In reality, they could be planting all similar maturities.” Watch for Goss’s Wilt Wet weather has fueled corn fungal corn diseases in recent years. Fortunately, fungicides are available as a tool to manage them. Not so with Goss’s wilt. Fungicides don’t work on this bacterial disease. “There has not been a tremendous amount of Goss’s wilt the last few years, but you know the potential is there,” says Hartz. The best way to curb this disease? Plant hybrids that tolerate Goss’s wilt, Hartz says. “We have been a lot more intensive about identifying genetics that can tolerate and stand up to Goss’s wilt,” Hartz says. Source: Agriculture.com
USDA works for US agriculture stateside, abroad
Bobby Richey, Jr., defined what the USDA and Foreign Ag Service are doing to help Nebraska?s international branding during the Governor?s Ag Conference March 15 in Kearney. Richey, deputy administrator in the Office of Foreign Service Operations, took on his new role in May 2016, working in an office that manages approximately 350 foreign nationals in USDA?s Foreign Agriculture?s 93 offices around the world. Read more in this week's print or e-editions. Rate this article:  Select ratingGive USDA works for US agriculture stateside, abroad 1/5Give USDA works for US agriculture stateside, abroad 2/5Give USDA works for US agriculture stateside, abroad 3/5Give USDA works for US agriculture stateside, abroad 4/5Give USDA works for US agriculture stateside, abroad 5/5 No votes yet
Duty-free Imports of South American Corn Being Considered by Mexico
The president of the U.S. Grains Council says Mexico, the number one customer of U.S. corn, is considering offering duty-free access to Brazil and Argentina. Tom Sleight tells Brownfield corn originating from South America is already competitively priced, and eliminating tariffs would likely result in less demand for grain produced in the U.S. "We don't want to see your best customer start to look elsewhere. That, combined with a lot of the intertwining transportation and marketing challenges you already have between the U.S. and Mexico...you don't want to disturb those either." Mexican corn imports from the U.S. were valued at more than $2 billion dollars in 2015. Sleight says officials in Mexico are upset about Trump Administration trade and immigration policies and willing to retaliate. "The problem is that you start to see political considerations come into what normally has been a no-brainer economic decision for Mexican feed millers to source their grain from the United States." Sleight says while it's tough to compete with the logistical advantages enjoyed by the U.S., buyers in Mexico are definitely open to sourcing corn supplies from South America. Source: AgriMarketing
Study Finds Americans Confused About New Fuel Choices
A new nationwide research study of over 2,000 adults 18+ conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of the Outdoor Power Equipment Institute has found that Americans seem to remain confused about new fuel choices at the pump and their appropriate usage. Even more concerning are reports of consumers mis-fueling their engine products. This year's poll shows more consumers have incorrectly used an E15 or higher ethanol fuel in an engine not designed for it compared to 2015. The OPEI survey found that more Americans who own outdoor power equipment are paying attention to the type of fuel they use this year than in years past, with 44% saying they pay attention, compared with 36% in 2016 and 35% in 2015. Additionally, awareness of ethanol in gasoline seems to remain steady, with 84%, overall, reporting they are aware of that fact this year compared to 85% in 2016 and 84% in 2015. "While most people seem to be aware that there is ethanol in gasoline, the poll results show increased mis-fueling. This raises big concerns as different ethanol content fuels become available in the marketplace," said Kris Kiser, President and CEO of OPEI. Over three in five Americans assume that any gas sold at fueling stations is safe for all of their cars as well as other, non-road engine products, like boats and mowers (63% in 2017, up from 60% in 2016 and 57% in 2015). This year's poll also shows roughly 2/3 of Americans believe higher ethanol blends of gas are safe to use in any engine (31%). U.S. government tests have shown ethanol's harmful effects on outdoor power equipment not developed for fuels containing greater than 10% ethanol. A Department of Energy study found that E15 fuel caused hotter operating temperatures, unintentional clutch engagement, erratic running, and engine-part failure. In 2014, OPEI launched its "Look Before You Pump" program to help educate consumers on proper fueling and pointing out that the U.S. government has said it is illegal to use gasoline containing more than 10% ethanol in outdoor power equipment. But concern about selecting the right fuel for the right product seems to be far from the minds of consumers. Price seems to continue to drive choice when purchasing gas. Most Americans (69%) admit to choosing the least expensive gas whenever possible (up from 63% in 2015). Only one quarter of Americans (25%) notice the ethanol content at the pump while just over half (53%) take note of the octane rating. Source: USAgNet
Corn-Improving Drought Tolerance with the Help of Robots
In March 2014, the National Science Foundation (NSF) awarded the University of Missouri a $20 million grant as part of a multi-institutional consortium to study how corn maintains root growth during drought conditions. Using funding from the NSF, Mizzou engineers on a multidisciplinary team have developed a robotic system that is changing the way scientists study crops and plant composition. Gui DeSouza, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science, and colleagues and students in his Vision-Guided and Intelligent Robotics (ViGIR) Laboratory partnered with researchers such as Felix Fritschi, an associate professor of plant sciences in the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources and Todd Mockler, a principal investigator with the Danforth Plant Science Center to study the effects of climate change on crops in Missouri. Using principles developed in the ViGIR lab, DeSouza is changing the way agriculturists collect data in the field. “I’ve been working with CAFNR assisting them in experiments where we helped to create 3-D images of root growth in the laboratory,” DeSouza said. “Now, we’re creating robotics to assist in creating those images out in the field.” The engineering and plant science research team developed a combination, two-pronged approach using a mobile sensing tower as well as a robot vehicle equipped with three levels of sensors. The tower inspects a 60-foot radius of a given field to identify areas affected by environmental stresses, while the vehicle collects data on individual plants. The sensors have the ability to measure various heights of the corn plant in order to reconstruct the 3-D image. “Measurements taken from the tower alert us if any of the plants are under stress, such as heat or drought,” DeSouza said. “The tower then signals the mobile robot, which we call the Vinobot, to go to a particular area of the field and perform data collection on the individual plants. The Vinobot has three sets of sensors and a robotic arm to collect temperature, humidity and light intensity at three different heights on the corn plant. This is called plant phenotyping, which assesses growth, development, yield and items such as tolerance and resistance to environmental stressors by correlating these to physiology and shape of the plants.” While the tower covers only a relatively small area, it can easily be moved to cover an entire field. This cost-effective measure means it is less expensive to have more towers, stationed at various points in the field, operating simultaneously. “The towers not only are inexpensive, they also are available throughout the day and night and can generate more data than any aerial vehicle could,” DeSouza said. Source: University of Missouri
Kentucky Wheat-True Armyworms Active Early
The true armyworm (Mythimna unipuncta) is one of the species of armyworms that feeds on small grains in spring in Kentucky. This species is different from fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda). Fall armyworms overwinter in south Texas and Mexico; whereas true armyworms overwinter as partially grown larvae in grasses or small grain fields east of the Rocky Mountains including Kentucky. Trapping Captures of male true armyworms have been completed in Kentucky using a modified Texas wire cone trap. This trap has an insect-specific pheromone that attracts male moths. Texas cone traps are also used for corn earworms, beet armyworm, and yellow stripped armyworm. Southwestern corn borer and fall armyworm are trapped using green bucket traps. After the first generation of armyworms emerge in spring, they need at least 1 week to start laying eggs. This species is very active at night and most of their feeding occurs at this time. Larvae feed first on bottom leaves and then move into the upper leaves. In wheat, injury to lower leaves can pass unnoticed without causing economic losses. However, upper leaf injuries, such as feeding and clipping off heads, can result in yield reduction. Under the 2017’s mild winter conditions, adult true armyworms were captured earlier than in previous years (February 24, 2017). In the last tally, 241 adults were captured from March 20 to March 27, 2017 in western Kentucky at Princeton. This count was greater than any previous tallies for March. Numbers of individual armyworms captured are not directly related to damage levels in crops. However, moth captures in pheromone traps can help to predict the presence of pests in fields. Scouting Given the current situation, scouting is strongly recommended. Look for armyworms on the ground and check for their frass or characteristic black pepper-like droppings. Insecticides Insecticide usage should be the last resource. If the average number of larvae is above threshold, an insecticide application might be required. Insecticides registered for control of true armyworms are provided on Table 1. Source: University of Kentucky Extension
Unique Wheat Variety Could Revolutionize Production
Stronger legs in fast-growing broilers, reduced phosphorus emissions to the environment, improved health for undernourished populations in developing countries and better use of scarce resources – these are some of the perspectives of a unique type of wheat; a wheat with a specific ability to increase the digestibility of phosphorus and other important minerals. Scientists from the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, have developed and patented the new type of wheat. Following years of research and development, the wheat then needed prove its worth in the tough environment of the digestive system – and it succeeded. Phosphorus is tied up It all started with a single wheat plant. The scientists were on the lookout for certain cereal genes that affect the availability of vital minerals in feed and foods. Minerals such as phosphorus are often tightly bound in phytate. The enzyme phytase helps to break down phytate, thus increasing mineral availability. Monogastrics such as pigs and poultry are unable to produce phytase. Cereals contain genes that code for phytase activity but the activity is not sufficient to break down all phytate compounds in the feed. Therefore, enzymes are added to the feed in conventional farming to help the animals utilize phosphorus. Adding enzymes to organic feed is not an option. If the animals do not utilize phosphorus optimally, it can affect their growth and health. In addition, the non-digested surplus is excreted and ends up in the environment. Scientists demonstrated phytase genes The scientists succeeded in finding the genes controlling phytase activity, which in itself was an important step. Next, they looked for a mutant wheat plant. This was the beginning of something big. We found the specific genes that are important to phytase activity in cereals. Then we found a mutant in which the phytase genes are expressed more powerfully than in ordinary cereals, resulting in increased phytase activity, explains Associate Professor Henrik Brinch-Pedersen, Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics. The unique wheat type was optimized and patented in cooperation with the British company Plant Bioscience Ltd. The name of the new wheat is HIGHPHY. Propagation of the wheat took place in Andalusia as it is possible to harvest twice in the growth season there. This meant that we could get twice as much new plant material than if we had propagated the wheat in Denmark, says Henrik Brinch-Pedersen. Coping with the digestive system The next question was if this super wheat with its increased phytase activity would be able to cope with the digestive system. The wheat was tested in broilers at Nottingham Trent University in Great Britain and the test results have now been published in the scientific journal Animal: An International Journal of Animal Bioscience. The broiler experiments demonstrated that supplementing the feed with HIGHPHY wheat was a very efficient way of releasing the phosphorus in the feed and make it easily available to the animals. For feed in which regular wheat had been completely replaced by HIGHPHY wheat the experiments demonstrated improved digestion coefficients for calcium and phosphorus of 14.6 and 22.8 percent, respectively, compared to feed containing regular wheat and with a supplement of phytase enzyme. Exciting perspectives for the new wheat The next step will be to test HIGHPHY on pigs and humans, and Henrik Brinch-Pedersen already sees interesting perspectives of the new cereal. Improved phosphorus digestion in livestock will result in reduced phosphorus emissions to the environment. In addition, calcium phosphate is a very scarce resource, so if phosphorus becomes more readily available to the animals, we can reduce our use of this important resource, he explains. HIGHPHY may also be of use to organic farmers. Organic farmers cannot add enzymes to animal feed. This means that organic livestock miss out on most of the phosphorus in the cereals, which will instead end up in the environment. This problem is easily solved by using the patented wheat, which has been naturally produced via ordinary breeding efforts, says Henrik Brinch-Pedersen. The new cereal may also be of significant importance to people in developing countries, as phytase also affects the availability of other minerals such as iron, zinc and – in certain circumstances – calcium. Major parts of the populations in developing countries suffer from iron and zinc deficiencies. 700 million people worldwide suffer from iron deficiency because of the high phytate level of their diets. If wheat containing its own phytate-metabolizing enzyme became available, this could significantly improve the health of the population in many of these countries, says Henrik Brinch-Pedersen. For many years, our aim has been to develop a high phytase activity wheat, and we have now reached that milestone. Demonstrating that it is also efficient in animal feed is extremely satisfying, says a pleased Henrik Brinch-Pedersen. Source: AgFax
Start Scouting for Wheat Diseases
The wheat-growing season is off to an early start due to a mild winter. Wheat fields are looking green from a distance , but closer examination reveals freeze damage in some fields caused by periods of subfreezing temperatures that occurred after growth had resumed. Currently, disease development has not progressed to noticeable levels; however, if the wet weather forecasted for this spring occurs, diseases are expected to develop to damaging levels. It is recommended that wheat fields be scouted regularly for early disease detection starting now. What to Look for When Scouting Early season diseases in Nebraska wheat fields are stripe rust, fungal leaf spots (tan spot and Septoria leaf blotch), and powdery mildew. View example images here. Stripe Rust Because stripe rust was widespread in the state on fall-planted wheat last fall, start scouting early in the growing season to detect any stripe rust that may have overwintered. Look for yellow rust pustules both in the lower and upper canopy. On young wheat, stripe rust usually does not form stripes. The most common early season fungal leaf spot diseases in Nebraska wheat are tan spot and Septoria leaf blotch. During the early stages of development, symptoms of these two diseases are not distinguishable. They consist of spots with brown necrotic centers surrounded by yellow halos. These spots start on the lower leaves and progress up the plant. They can enlarge into large dead areas on leaves. Tan spot and Septoria leaf blotch are most severe in fields with wheat residue on the soil surface. Powdery Mildew Favored by high humidity, powdery mildew starts on the lower leaves and stems where humidity remains high for prolonged periods. It is characterized by white, cottony patches of mycelium and conidia (asexual spores) on the plant surface. The white patches later turn dull gray-brown. Look in the lower canopy for powdery mildew. Powdery mildew can be plentiful in the lower canopy, but not visible on the top of the wheat crop. Management Base the decision to apply a fungicide early in the growing season on the following: Presence of stripe rust based on scouting. If stripe rust is detected early in the growing season, it is advisable to apply a fungicide to stop it or slow down its development. A wet spring is expected in Nebraska based on this year’s weather forecasts. This raises the risk for development of stripe rust if it is present in a field. Even if you have planted a variety known to be resistant to stripe rust, if the disease is present in the field, a preventive fungicide application will be worthwhile. Fungal leaf spot diseases and powdery mildew developing to severe levels. If wheat was drilled into wheat stubble and tan spot, Septoria leaf blotch, or powdery mildew are developing to severe levels, an early season fungicide application may be warranted. Under normal weather conditions, these diseases develop slowly enough that a flag leaf fungicide application alone is sufficient to control them effectively. Accurate identification of the disease present in a field. It is important to positively identify the disease present in a field before deciding whether to apply a fungicide. Virus diseases such as wheat streak mosaic cannot be controlled by applying a fungicide. Economics: Due to low wheat prices, apply a fungicide only if you have to. Multiple applications in one growing season may not be profitable or economically feasible. Rust Update from Southern States Stripe rust and leaf rust have been active in Texas. As of March 22, stripe rust activity was low in Texas due to warmer temperatures; however, leaf rust is developing to severe levels. As of March 15, stripe rust had not been observed in Oklahoma and leaf rust had been observed only at trace levels. There have been no reports of rust diseases in Kansas. These reports indicate that the amount of rust inoculum blowing into Nebraska this year from southern states may be smaller than in the previous three years. However, due to the forecast of wet weather for this spring, growers should be prepared to manage fungal diseases. It takes only a small amount of inoculum for a disease to develop and spread under favorable weather conditions. Apart from the rusts, inoculum of other diseases is already present in Nebraska wheat fields. Source: University of Nebraska CropWatch
Use Caution When Considering Farm Equipment Leases
Many factors in the current agricultural economy are leading producers to consider a lease arrangement of new capital purchases instead of an outright purchase. When considering this option, it’s important to consider both the pros and cons as well as possible effects on your tax return. Pros A Positive Change to Your Balance Sheet Reducing debt will improve the debt-to-asset ratio for a farm that has equity in asset (see box). The current ratio and working capital of the operation will also improve by removing that current debt from the balance sheet. Some lending institutions will include the upcoming lease payment as a current debt so this pro may depend on the individual. No Asset Depreciation Most farm equipment depreciates rapidly. The last few years have certainly been an exception to that generalization, but we are seeing the trend of prices for used equipment dropping again. One argument often made for a lease is that you don’t see the depreciation because you don’t own the asset. On the other hand, by not owning it you never build equity in the asset. The importance of this depends on the individual operation’s goals. A young or beginning farmer may look at leasing equipment as a means to free up their leverage ratio to allow for equity to be used to buy land someday. A small farmer may not have enough acres to spread out the ownership cost of a combine and leasing could allow him to use a good machine without such a large outlay (although the minimum hour requirements of many leases removes this advantage). An operation that trades equipment every year or two won’t build equity in the asset anyway. Cons Taxes Most financial institutions that furnish equipment with lease agreements put taxes at the top of their list of why you should lease equipment; however, as a tax preparer, I list it as the top con. Tax law certainly allows that rental or leases of farm assets is an “ordinary and necessary business expense.” They also clearly define what they DON’T consider a lease, but rather a Conditional Sales Contract in IRS Publication 535. In the leases I see there are many factors that trip IRS’s rules, but the most common is certainly a lease that has a stated or imputed interest value or does not have a true fair-market value buyout schedule in the end. In simpler terms, a true lease will not have an equal payment as the buyout, there won’t be a stated interest rate, and you won’t gain any equity in the asset. Deferred Tax Gain Whenever a producer moves from owning an asset to leasing one, we have to deal with the sale of the old asset. Even if the dealer allows a “trade-in” of the value of the owned tractor on the lease of a new one (which pokes further holes in IRS’s view of a true lease), it is not a qualified like-kind exchange because you don’t own the new tractor. This means that you will need to recognize the gain on the sale of the old tractor when you dispose of it. If we had a tractor with a fair market value (FMV) of $100,000 and $0 basis assuming we’ve used all the depreciation (likely with the enhanced depreciation that we’ve enjoyed the past few years), you have a $100,000 gain and could easily recognize a $20,000 or higher tax bill as a result. No Equity Builds Regardless of the IRS definition of a true lease, there are management concerns with never building equity. A few types of operations may benefit from having a lease, but there is a long-term downside to never building equity in the major pieces of equipment. Operations that can get ahead of the debt load and build equity in equipment will have that net worth and eventually improved cash flow for not having the make those debt payments. Conclusion When a producer asks me whether to lease or purchase an asset, I often step back and evaluate the question based on two purchase options, throwing out the tax benefit of a “lease” until I find a lease agreement that meets IRS guidelines. See an example here. While understanding the tax implications of any decision is important, I encourage producers to look at this decision based on which option makes the most management sense (lower payments, better interest rate, etc) for their operation. Source: University of Nebraska CropWatch
Corn Prices Moving Forward
May corn futures prices tumbled to the lowest price level since December during the week ending March 24. Large crop estimates from around the world placed downward pressure on the corn market despite some positive domestic consumption numbers in exports and corn used for ethanol. According to a University of Illinois agricultural economist, large global corn stocks appear to be the key factor currently in the corn market. “Numerous recently released USDA reports show a mixed picture for old- and new-crop corn prices in 2017,” says Todd Hubbs. “If the United States sees a reduction in corn production this year, it may provide limited support for corn prices due to the growth in foreign production.” The USDA World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report released on March 9 contained larger forecasts for the current harvest of the corn crops in both Brazil and Argentina. The same report raised corn exports and year-ending stocks in South America. The Brazilian corn crop is projected at 3.6 billion bushels. Although some market observers expect upward revisions of this number, Hubbs says it is quite large currently and would require an ideal crop for much improvement. “The Argentinian corn crop is in a similar situation, with a projected production level of 1.48 billion bushels,” Hubbs says. “Current weather in South America indicates a good possibility for these large production numbers. At present, the world stocks-to-use ratio sits at 21.2 percent, which is up slightly from February and shows some upward potential moving forward.” Domestic use reports for corn provide some support for corn prices. Census Bureau corn export estimates from September 2016 through January 2017 exceeded the cumulative USDA inspection estimates by 42 million bushels. Weekly export inspections through March 23 placed corn exports at 1.254 billion bushels. If the 42 million bushel spread is maintained through March 23, corn exports sit at 1.296 million bushels. “The current pace of corn exports looks to exceed the USDA marketing year estimate of 2.225 billion bushels,” Hubbs says. “Current U.S. Gulf FOB prices are under competitor prices in Brazil and Argentina with an expectation that the competitive advantage in the export market will be maintained until Brazilian exports from the second crop come into the market this summer.” According to Hubbs, in addition to the backing from export numbers, ethanol production reports have also been supportive for corn prices. Weekly estimates from the U.S. Energy Information Administration indicate that ethanol production in March 2017 is running about 5 percent above production in March 2016. Ethanol production continues at over 1 million barrels a week and places corn used for ethanol well on pace to reach the USDA projection of 5.4 billion bushels. “A large amount of distillers grain production combined with lower DDGS exports create a scenario in which the use of corn for ethanol production may be hindering corn used in feed,” Hubbs says. Livestock reports present a neutral picture for feed use. The USDA’s monthly Cattle on Feed report released on March 24 indicated that feedlots with capacity of 1,000 head or more placed 4 percent more cattle into feedlots during February 2017 than during February 2016. The total number of cattle on feed as of March 1 was approximately the same as on the same date last year. Broiler chick placements are running around 1 to 2 percent higher than last year during March. The March 20 Milk Production report showed 56,000 more head of milk cows for February of 2017 than the previous year. On March 30, the USDA will release the Quarterly Hogs and Pigs report. This report will reveal the size of the pig crop during the previous quarter (December 2016 to February 2017). Hubbs says the estimates will provide insight into potential feed demand from the hog sector during the last half of the 2016-17 marketing year for corn. “The ability to meet the 5.6 billion bushels projected by the USDA for feed and residual during the 2016-17 marketing year may be hampered by the availability of distillers grains and other corn feed substitutes,” Hubbs says. The most important reports for old- and new-crop corn price prospects are still to come. On March 31, the USDA will release the quarterly Grain Stocks report which will reveal the magnitude of stocks of corn as of March 1. The estimate of March 1 corn stocks will be fundamental for projecting feed and residual use of corn for the current marketing year. Also on March 31, the USDA will release the annual Prospective Plantings report. Hubbs says expectations on corn planting intentions tend to indicate fewer acres than last year’s planted acreage of 94 million acres. “If corn planting intentions are near the low end of expectations, which currently sit in a range between 89 and 92.5 million acres, the report could provide support for old- and new-crop prices,” Hubbs says. “A large March 1 corn stocks number will send a signal of lower feed use and the weight of the large foreign corn production could create downward pressure on prices despite some positive indications of corn consumption. The size of a price adjustment, if any, is contingent on the ability of demand to outpace the large corn supplies in South America.” Source: Todd Hubbs, University of Illinois Extension
Great article on how to control marestail with spring burndown ...
Great article on how to control marestail with spring burndown practices>
Iowa State Ag Economist Optimistic Because of Continuing Strong Exports
Iowa State Extension Economist Chad Hart sees a brighter picture for agriculture in 2017 thanks to growth in international demand. At the Hills Bank Ag Outlook conference March 9, Hart said he expected to see near-record supplies again this year, both domestically and globally, but expected record demand to support prices. He said he is worried about trade rhetoric with Mexico, but hopes tough talk won't mess up trade flows. "Are we going to build a wall? Yep, we will. I want something built into it though: What I really want in it is a drive-through window," Hart said. "Because when you are looking at Mexico and the corn market, they are 25 percent of our exports." With corn exports up nearly 60 percent from year-ago levels to top export markets, he said countries that are buying may be stock piling in case the rules change. In 2016, world production was at record levels, Hart said. But China, the world's second largest corn producer, saw decreased corn production last fall. In a quest to be self-sufficient in corn production, China established a $9 price target for corn, boosting China's domestic corn production but creating a costly dilemma for China's livestock feeders. China's livestock feeders imported cheaper corn, and now the country has large stockpiles. "What used to be #2 yellow corn is suddenly becoming #4 mixed grain, and they are losing value," Hart said. China began a multistep process to phase out the price target, and the result has already been lower corn plantings, he said. "In the short term, that's a negative. But over the long run, I'm going to argue it's a positive for us," Hart said. Other consequences from China's new policy include higher soybean plantings in China and increased tariffs for feeds competing for storage space with corn, namely distiller's grains. With a hog industry six times larger than the one in the United States and soybean imports three times larger than China's own production, Hart said China should continue to support a "tremendous export market." Surging meat exports to developing countries will ultimately support grain prices as well, Hart said. "What we're seeing right now, and have been experiencing over the last six months especially, has been a strong surge in overall agricultural demand as we watch the developing world transition some of their food demand from plant protein to meat protein," Hart said. Ethanol and biodiesel should also continue to grow, he said. Hart said consumers are choosing higher ethanol blends at the gas pump because they are cheaper. As an example of the cost competitiveness of ethanol today, he pointed to exports to the United Arab Emirates, which is importing ethanol to address smog. Looking to policy, Hart said he is glad to see the Trump administration has picked people in agriculture who understand why ag trade is important, such as former Georgia Governor Sonny Perdue, who comes from a cotton-producing state which relies heavily on exports, and Iowa Governor Terry Branstad. Dan Mitchell, a fiscal policy expert with the Cato Institute, cautioned that Trump's top trade appointments, Peter Navarro, Wilbur Ross and Robert Lighthizer, have all expressed protectionist rhetoric. Mitchell questioned the logic that we are somehow cheated if other countries don't buy as much from us we buy from them. He said this is the case when he shops for groceries, but that's because he values their food more than his paper money. "I think Trump is wrong on protectionism, the real question is, how far will he take it?" he said. On regulatory policy, Mitchell said he was very optimistic. Trump "seems to want to reduce the burden of regulation and red tape," Mitchell said. But he questioned how progress would be defined - by blocking additional regulations or undoing existing regulations, which involves the federal rulemaking process. Jim Tobin, a former Monsanto executive and current advisory board member, discussed ag mergers during the conference. Tobin said approval in Europe will mostly likely be the deciding factor as to whether mergers between ag companies Syngenta and ChemChina, Dow and DuPont and Bayer and Monsanto will proceed. A decision on the Syngenta merger approval in Europe could be coming later this month; with the Dow decision potentially one to two months out; and a Bayer decision not likely until the end of the year, Tobin said. He expected more integrated product offerings as a result of the mergers, and said all three proposed entities have full research and development pipelines. Source: AgriMarketing
National
Purdue Soybean Showcase
Brownfield will be on the ground for the Purdue Soybean Showcase July 27, 2017 in West Lafayette, IN Continue reading Purdue Soybean Showcase at Brownfield Ag News.      
Follow recommended planting depths
An account manager with Peterson Farms Seed cautions growers who change planting depths based on soil conditions. Rob Wentz says research continues to validate optimum levels, regardless of the moisture profile. “When you plant a little deeper trying to chase moisture, it’s not going to pay off.? Your best bet is just sticking to an inch and-a-half to two inches for corn, and one to two inches for soybeans.” He tells Brownfield planting shallower into saturated soil can lead to problems too. Continue reading Follow recommended planting depths at Brownfield Ag News.      
Midday cash livestock markets
USDA Mandatory reported negotiated cash cattle trade was very limited on light to moderate demand in the Southern Plains and Nebraska on Wednesday. A few sales were reported in the Texas Panhandle from 126.00 to 129.25, with Kansas sales from 128.75 to 129.00. In Nebraska a few live sales ranged from 131.50 to 133.00. However not enough sales in any feeding region for an adequate market trend. There are just a few scatted bids in cattle country on Thursday at 126.00 live in Texas, and 208.00 dressed in Nebraska. Continue reading Midday cash livestock markets at Brownfield Ag News.      
Senator calls for funding restoration for Great Lakes projects
A member of the Senate Ag Committee says he?s working to restore funding to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative in the new federal budget. President Trump?s 2018 budget proposal eliminates the $300 million fund. Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown says he has been working to restore the funding and discussed it with Ag Secretary nominee Sonny Perdue. “He committed to that both in person and discussed it with the committee. This needs to be bipartisan, the administration needs to back down on this and work with local communities. Continue reading Senator calls for funding restoration for Great Lakes projects at Brownfield Ag News.      
Monsanto developing nematode fighting chemistry
Monsanto is developing a proprietary nematicide for growers, with expected EPA registration this spring and a full commercial launch in 2018. Jared Thomas, Monsanto Seed Applied Solutions portfolio manager, tells Brownfield farmers are underestimating the damage nematodes are causing in soybeans. Thomas told Brownfield at 2017 Commodity Classic, their NEMA STRIKE technology will be the solution.   Continue reading Monsanto developing nematode fighting chemistry at Brownfield Ag News.      
Weekly soybean, wheat exports top estimates
The USDA reports combined old and new crop soybean and wheat export sales for the week ending March 23rd were above most pre-report estimates, while soybean products were within expectations and corn was below many anticipated ranges. Physical shipments of corn and soybeans were more than what’s needed to meet USDA projections for the 2016/17 marketing year. Wheat came out at 464,100 tons (17.1 million bushels), up 11% from the week ending March 16th and 33% higher than the four week average. Continue reading Weekly soybean, wheat exports top estimates at Brownfield Ag News.      
Monsanto Acceleron brand expanding
Kellie Brown, Monsanto’s U.S. Seed Applied Solutions Marketing manager Kellie Brown says there are now more choices and customizable options for farmers this growing season. U.S. Seed Applied Solutions?recommends using both synthetic and microbial products together for the most yield potential.   Continue reading Monsanto Acceleron brand expanding at Brownfield Ag News.      
Senate Ag Committee advances Perdue nomination
The Senate Agriculture Committee has voted to advance the nomination of former Georgia Governor Sonny Perdue as Secretary of Agriculture. Chairman Pat Roberts says he?s pleased with the swift strides made to move the confirmation towards the finish line, acknowledging that farmers have waited too long for this important position to be filled. The full Senate will now consider the nomination, although it remains unclear when that vote will occur. Continue reading Senate Ag Committee advances Perdue nomination at Brownfield Ag News.      
Early planting comes with risks
A crop scientist says there are risks to early season planting that farmers should consider. Emerson Nafziger, a crop scientist from the University of Illinois says crops planted in late March to early April take longer to emerge and may not necessarily produce higher yields. Audio: Emerson Nafziger, Crop Scientist, University of Illinois Continue reading Early planting comes with risks at Brownfield Ag News.      
Ag Secretary could boost relations with Mexico
The president of the U.S. Grains Council (USGC) says he?s hopeful the confirmation of the next USDA Ag Secretary will improve strained trade relations with Mexico. Tom Sleight tells Brownfield the Trump Administration has assured him enhanced dialogue with trading partners will begin once all cabinet positions are filled. “I think we’re getting closer.? I think you’ll see some movement fairly soon on both Governor Perdue as Secretary of Agriculture and Robert Lighthizer as U.S. Continue reading Ag Secretary could boost relations with Mexico at Brownfield Ag News.      
National Institute for Animal Agriculture (NIAA) Annual Conference
Brownfield Anchor/Reporter Andrew Flinn will be on the ground covering National Institute for Animal Agriculture (NIAA) Annual Conference?April 5 ? 6, 2017 in Columbus, Ohio.   Continue reading National Institute for Animal Agriculture (NIAA) Annual Conference at Brownfield Ag News.      
Indiana road funding bill moves forward
The House-approved road and bridge funding bill, HB 1002, is headed to the full Senate. Earlier this week the Senate Committee on Tax and Fiscal Policy approved the proposed legislation, which includes an increase in the gasoline tax and could potentially allow the Indiana Department of Transportation to toll interstate highways. Indiana farmer Mark Bacon says repairing the state?s infrastructure has been put off long enough.? ?We?ve been working on this for a number of years trying to find funds for roads,? he says.? Continue reading Indiana road funding bill moves forward at Brownfield Ag News.      
Beef industry asks Trump to help get U.S. beef back into China
The U.S. beef industry is asking President Trump to help get U.S. beef back into China. Trump is scheduled to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping in April and Kent Bacus with the National Cattlemen?s Beef Association (NCBA) says they?re urging Trump to raise the issue of U.S. beef access during that meeting. ?We need someone who is a master negotiator, someone who can close the deal,? Bacus says. ?President Trump has really sold himself as that person and we think this is a great opportunity to show what he?s worth.? China banned U.S. Continue reading Beef industry asks Trump to help get U.S. beef back into China at Brownfield Ag News.      
National Barley Growers president says no barley, no beer
The president of the National Barley Growers Association (NBGA) had a very direct message for members of a House Ag Subcommittee during a hearing on general farm commodities and risk management Tuesday. “As the brewers know very well, without barley you have no beer.? No barley, no beer.” That?s west-central Minnesota farmer Peter Friederichs, who raised concerns about reduced demand for barley and the need for an adequate safety net in the next Farm Bill. Continue reading National Barley Growers president says no barley, no beer at Brownfield Ag News.      
Committee vote on Perdue pushed back
The Committee vote on whether to favorably report the nomination of Governor Sonny Perdue to be the next US Secretary of Agriculture has been delayed. Chairman of the Senate Ag Committee Pat Roberts announced the committee will now hold its business meeting on Thursday to cast its vote – it was originally scheduled for Wednesday. The vote is schedule to happen immediate following the first floor vote in the Senate. Continue reading Committee vote on Perdue pushed back at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
TheNFiles: Nitrogen Margins Begin to Narrow
Stable urea pricing is allowing the rest of the nitrogen segment to narrow our product margins.
Vilsack Sees Challenges Ahead For Perdue
Things have been going smoothly for former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue on his road to lead the USDA, but it might not stay that way.
TheNFiles: Nitrogen Margins Begin to Narrow
Stable urea pricing is allowing the rest of the nitrogen segment to narrow our product margins.
2017 Plant Preview: I-States Tilt Slightly Toward Soybeans
Although economics in the heart of the Corn Belt favor a switch to more soybeans and less corn, experts in the I-States of Illinois, Indiana and Iowa say rotational considerations and core crop competencies will keep the shift from being too dramatic.
EPA Rules it Will Not Ban Chlorpyrifos
The Trump Administration on Wednesday denied a petition by environmental groups that sought to ban a common pesticide used on citrus fruits, apples, cherries and other crops, reversing a push by the Obama administration to revoke all uses of the pesticide on food after a government review concluded it could harm children's brains.
Trelleborg Markets New Tire for Ag Spreaders
When you’re evaluating a new piece of application equipment that costs several hundred thousand dollars, tires might be the last thing you think about. But with the new Trelleborg VF1050/50R32 TM3000 Spreader Tire, you might start giving tires more consideration. “We saw a gap in the industry that we believed we could fill,” says Andrea Masella, country manager for North American Trelleborg Wheel Systems, Spartanburg, S.C.
Group Alleges Human Labor Trafficking in Dairy
Polaris, a Washington, D.C.-based non-government organization, released a report today that alleges labor trafficking is occurring in agriculture. ​
Chinese Dairy Nearly Crashed Banks After Stocks Plunged
Amid rumors of fraud and false reporting, Chinese dairy company Huishan Dairy saw stock prices fall between 85-90% on Friday.
Cambodian Government Recalls Fungicide to Conform to New EU Rules
The government has ordered a nationwide recall of the fungicide tricyclazole to keep its rice exports eligible for the important EU market, but said it might not get the chemical out of its supplies in time to meet the bloc?s July deadline, reports Van Roeun on CambodiaDaily.com. The E.U.?s new threshold is 0.01 milligrams of tricyclazole residue per kilogram of rice paddy, down from the current cutoff of 1 milligram. The Agriculture Ministry issued an announcement on Monday asking farmers to stop using the fungicide and all wholesalers and retailers to hand over their supplies to the government. It also orders provincial agriculture departments to inspect suppliers for compliance. The statement said that tricyclazole can leave a ?residue? on treated crops. ?All these chemicals are being collected and stored and they are no longer allowed to import [them],? Agriculture Minister Veng Sakhon said on Tuesday. Otherwise, he added, the E.U. ?will stop importing our rice because they say it would affect people?s health.? Read the full story on CambodiaDaily.com.
Price Action Relatively Quiet Amid Position Squaring
LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_512413'); Pro Farmer Editor Brian Grete provides closing market commentary.
Analyst: $105/cwt Will Be the Lowest Price for Cattle All Year
The cattle market has seen some strong rallies in the first few months of 2017.
6 Top Alfalfa Winterkill Factors
Main concerns about alfalfa production during this time of the year are the potential for winter injury and winter kill. In this article, a description of factors that affect alfalfa plants is discussed.
Should We Expect a Spring Rally in Corn?
Similar to last year the trade is expecting a sharp decline in corn acres in favor of more soybean acres.
Climate Change: China Steps Forward, U.S. Steps Back
China promised Wednesday to stick to its climate commitments after President Donald Trump eased U.S. curbs on coal and oil use, opening the way for Beijing to assert itself as a leader in environmental policy.