@C - CORN - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
May '17 362'4 358'4 360'6 1'6
Jul '17 370'0 366'2 368'2 1'4
Sep '17 376'6 373'2 375'4 1'6
Dec '17 387'0 383'4 386'0 1'6
Mar '18 396'4 393'2 395'4 1'4
May '18 402'2 399'4 402'2 1'6
@S - SOYBEANS - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
May '17 950'4 943'4 948'6 3'0
Jul '17 961'2 954'2 960'0 3'4
Aug '17 963'4 956'6 962'2 3'6
Sep '17 959'4 953'6 959'0 3'4
Nov '17 957'4 952'2 956'4 2'4
Jan '18 964'0 959'0 962'2 1'4
Mar '18 965'6 961'6 965'2 2'0
@K - HARD RED WINTER WHEAT - KCBT
Month High Low Last Chg
May '17 418'0 411'0 415'6 3'4
Jul '17 431'2 423'6 428'6 3'4
Sep '17 447'2 440'2 444'6 3'2
Dec '17 472'4 465'4 470'2 3'4
@L - LIVE CATTLE - CME
Month High Low Last Chg
Apr '17 132.975 132.500 132.950 0.925
Jun '17 119.325 118.275 119.150 0.625
@C - COTTON #2 - ICEFU
Month High Low Last Chg
May '17 79.91 79.91 79.91 -0.78
Jul '17 79.36 78.39 78.65 -0.74
Oct '17
DTN Click here for info on Exchange delays.
Local
How Late Is Too Late to Treat Wheat Scab with Fungicide?
Much of the wheat crop in Kentucky has headed out and is flowering. Stripe rust is now present in many Kentucky counties on susceptible varieties, and according to the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center, the current risk of Fusarium head blight (also known as scab) is anywhere from low to high, depending on where you are in the state. If fungicides are being considered for protection against Fusarium head blight, Caramba (BASF Corp.) and Prosaro (Bayer CropScience) fungicides have been shown in multi-year, multi-state university trials to be the most effective in reducing Fusarium head blight and the associated mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol (DON), which can contaminate harvested grain. The best time to apply a foliar fungicide for protection against Fusarium head blight is when wheat plants are beginning to flower (Feekes growth state 10.5.1). Many fields were at this stage last week, and some were sprayed prior to the rainfall that occurred recently. For those fields that were at the Feekes 10.5.1 growth stage late last week, but were not sprayed prior to the rainfall, an application of Caramba or Prosaro within the next few days may still provide effective protection against Fusarium head blight and DON contamination. A research study conducted between 2011 and 2013 by scientists at The Ohio State University and the University of Illinois showed that applications of either Caramba or Prosaro up to 6 days following Feekes growth stage 10.5.1 provided a similar level of control of Fusarium head blight and DON when compared to those fungicides applied at the Feekes 10.5.1 growth stage. A paper was published on this research. It can be found here. Source: Carl A. Bradley, Southeast Farm Press
National
Tough call?plant or wait
Farmers are faced with a tough decision. With cold and wet weather in the forecast, do you keep planting or wait for warmer and drier conditions? Larry Klever, who farms in west-central Iowa near Audubon, decided to keep going. ?I started a little over a week ago and I?m still planting today (Wednesday)?in the face of the cold weather,? Klever says. ?It?s kind of risky and I?m not sure of the results. Continue reading Tough call–plant or wait at Brownfield Ag News.      
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Did you know that you can support your local farmer, ethanol partner ...
Did you know that you can support your local farmer, ethanol partner and communities by fueling up at your Aurora Cooperative A-Stop? When you purchase ethanol-blended gasoline from your local A-Stop, you're not just pumping high-quality, clean-burning gas into your vehicle, you're pumping revenue back into your local communities. Be sure to stop in at one of your local A-Stops to fuel up with your locally grown and produced ethanol from your local fuel partner. E15 WILL BE AVAILABLE at the York, Grand Island and Aurora West A-Stops next week.>
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Results from the Cooperative Speaking Contest at the State FFA ...
Results from the Cooperative Speaking Contest at the State FFA Convention held earlier this month...congrats to all the winners! Abigail Kleager of Aurora received a 4th place finish!>
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Great story about one of our farmer-owners!
Great story about one of our farmer-owners!>
AURORA AG NETWORK Local Growing Degree Unit Information for Your ...
AURORA AG NETWORK Local Growing Degree Unit Information for Your Farm Every Monday we will be posting the soil temps for the previous 10 days as well as provide you a GDU forecast for the upcoming 10 days for the western, central and eastern regions. Update for the week of 4/24/17: Soil temps and conditions have been favorable for planting the past week. However, with little expected heat accumulation, the chance of rain, and low overnight temperatures, the forecast for the current week is highly unfavorable for continued planting. Germination of seed planted this week can be adversely impacted by the cold temperatures, cold-water shock, and could result in reduced seedling vigor. ? Ideal soil temps for corn are a consistent 50?F (or above), with adequate field moisture. ? Continued volatility ? Our AquaSpy moisture probes indicate temperatures are still fluctuating as much as 15?F to 18?F within 24 hours at the 4? depth. In some areas, dipping below the 50?F mark. This fluctuation can be much wider at the common planting depth of 2?. ? Be aware of your current field conditions. Fields with heavy residue can be 6? - 8?F cooler than bare ground. ? What will conditions be in the 48 hours after planting? Rapid seed water uptake (imbibition) occurs in this window and can adversely affect germination if weather or soil temperatures turn cold during this period. Emerge Together, Win Together. Uniform emergence is critical for maximum yield>
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GIVEAWAY TIME! Send us your planting pictures and your name will be ...
GIVEAWAY TIME! Send us your planting pictures and your name will be entered into a drawing for a $100 Cabela's gift card! We will be giving away one gift card a week for 5 weeks so keep those pictures coming! Here is how to get your name into the drawing: 1. Take a planting picture (don't be afraid to include some smiling faces!) 2. Post that picture to our Facebook page (Aurora Cooperative) or tag us on Twitter @AuroraAgNetwork 3. Be sure to like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.>
Local
How Late Is Too Late to Treat Wheat Scab with Fungicide?
Much of the wheat crop in Kentucky has headed out and is flowering. Stripe rust is now present in many Kentucky counties on susceptible varieties, and according to the Fusarium Head Blight Prediction Center, the current risk of Fusarium head blight (also known as scab) is anywhere from low to high, depending on where you are in the state. If fungicides are being considered for protection against Fusarium head blight, Caramba (BASF Corp.) and Prosaro (Bayer CropScience) fungicides have been shown in multi-year, multi-state university trials to be the most effective in reducing Fusarium head blight and the associated mycotoxin, deoxynivalenol (DON), which can contaminate harvested grain. The best time to apply a foliar fungicide for protection against Fusarium head blight is when wheat plants are beginning to flower (Feekes growth state 10.5.1). Many fields were at this stage last week, and some were sprayed prior to the rainfall that occurred recently. For those fields that were at the Feekes 10.5.1 growth stage late last week, but were not sprayed prior to the rainfall, an application of Caramba or Prosaro within the next few days may still provide effective protection against Fusarium head blight and DON contamination. A research study conducted between 2011 and 2013 by scientists at The Ohio State University and the University of Illinois showed that applications of either Caramba or Prosaro up to 6 days following Feekes growth stage 10.5.1 provided a similar level of control of Fusarium head blight and DON when compared to those fungicides applied at the Feekes 10.5.1 growth stage. A paper was published on this research. It can be found here. Source: Carl A. Bradley, Southeast Farm Press
Ag Groups Respond to NAFTA Withdrawal Plans
The National Corn Growers Association today denounced reports that the White House has drafted plans to withdraw from the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The following is a statement from NCGA President Wesley Spurlock. "Mr. President, America's corn farmers helped elect you. We are strong supporters of your administration and continue to stand ready to work with you to build a better farm economy. That begins with strong trade policy. "Withdrawing from NAFTA would be disastrous for American agriculture. We cannot disrupt trade with two of our top trade partners and allies. This decision will cost America's farmers and ranchers markets that we will never recover. "NAFTA has been a huge win for American agriculture. Corn and corn product exports today account for 31 percent of farmer income. Mexico is the top export market for corn. Canada is also a top market for corn and ethanol. With a farm economy that is already weak, losing access to these markets will be a huge blow that will be felt throughout the ag value chain. "Mr. President, agriculture and rural America are counting on you. We urge you not to withdraw from NAFTA." Wheat growers respond U.S. Wheat Associates (USW) and the National Association of Wheat Growers (NAWG) are alarmed over media reports today that the Trump Administration is considering a withdrawal from the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Mexico is our largest U.S. wheat buyer, importing more than 10 percent of all U.S. wheat exports this year. NAFTA truly opened the door to the strong and growing market opportunity in Mexico. Closing that door would be a terrible blow to the U.S. wheat industry and its Mexican customers. USW and NAWG understand that there are several elements of the trade agreement that could be re-examined and modernized. However, we believe withdrawing from NAFTA would be a serious mistake. It could lead to new tariffs on U.S. wheat and threaten to undermine the long-standing, loyal relationship U.S. wheat farmers have built with Mexico's wheat buyers and food industry. That would be devastating to U.S. wheat farmers already facing unprofitable prices and increasingly aggressive wheat exporting competitors. Pork producers statement "The North American Free Trade Agreement has been a tremendous success for the U.S. pork industry, which has seen an explosion in exports to Canada and Mexico since the deal was implemented in 1994. "In fact, Mexico and Canada are now our No. 2 and No. 4 markets, so we absolutely must not have any disruptions to U.S. pork exports there. Even a short-term interruption in our exports would have a significant negative economic impact on U.S. pork producers. "Abandoning NAFTA and going back to pre-NAFTA tariffs would be financially devastating to U.S. pork producers. Tens of thousands of U.S. jobs dependent on those exports would be lost. "The bottom line is U.S. pork trade with Canada and Mexico has been very robust, and we need to maintain and even improve that trade. We're all for modernizing NAFTA, but we cannot support efforts that would undermine the livelihoods of America's 60,000 pork producers." Source: AgriMarketing
Application Rigs in the Field but Slowed by Rain, Cool Temps
From Missouri to Minnesota and in between, many planting efforts are stalled thanks to cool, soggy conditions. Farmers are finishing up burndown and pre-emergence herbicide sprays as well as fertilizer applications. Jeff Littrell, who farms with his son in southeast Minnesota, summed up the Corn Belt’s status after a long drive to St. Louis. “We get to see lots of farm country, and this trip down was very odd this year with very little if any activity going until the Macomb, Illinois, area,” he told DTN in an email. There are pockets of productivity, of course. With two-thirds of their corn seed in the ground, Scott Wallis’ operation in southern Indiana is humming right along. And over in Virginia, Stephen Ellis has finished planting full-season soybeans and is nearing the end of his corn planting. Most growers told DTN they were actively applying herbicides and fertilizer or wrapping up these field-prep activities. Some expressed concerns at growers who have rushed to get herbicide applications on in questionable conditions, especially given the strict labels for new dicamba herbicides. SLOW PLANTING, CHILLY CORN On Monday, USDA estimated that corn planting across the country had slowed to 6%, behind the five-year average of 9% and half of the 2016 pace of 12%. “It’s been a variable week for rainfall across the Midwest,” noted DTN Senior Ag Meteorologist Bryce Anderson. One to 2 inches have fallen on the northern and western Corn Belt, with a drier trend favoring the south-central and eastern areas, such as central Illinois through Indiana and Ohio, he said. Farmers from eight Corn Belt states told DTN via email that they were waiting for warmer and drier soils to start planting. Ohio farmers Keith Peters and Jan Layman haven’t seen much corn going in the ground in central and west-central Ohio, respectively. Over in northwest Indiana, Randy Plummer has seen “next to nothing planted,” and the planters are still parked where Gerald Gauck farms in the southwest corner of the state. It’s too cold for most corn growers’ tastes in North Dakota, farmer Dave Kjelstrup noted. But at least one Michigan grower expects planters to start rolling next week. “As an agronomist and farmer, I am worried about this corn that is in the ground,” added Jay Magnussen, who farms in northwest Iowa. He estimates 5% to 10% of corn has been planted in his area. “We have had an inch of rain in the last two days and corn seeds taking in 40- to 45-degree rainwater will see imbibitional chilling and stand loss,” he said of conditions early in the week. SPRAYERS ROLLING Lots of sprayers have been moving across the Midwest. Growers from Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan and Missouri said cover crops and winter annual weeds were the primary targets of herbicide applications. Fields where fall herbicide control didn’t happen have proved problematic. A handful of growers told DTN they have had to practice patience while waiting out windy conditions in March and April before they could spray. Some may be moving too fast, warned Brian Corkill, of Galva, Illinois. He posted a picture on Twitter on April 15 of a grower running a sprayer as winds speeds clocked in at “a sustained 28 mph.” Corkill and many fellow farmers on Twitter expressed concerns that ignoring herbicide labels, especially the highly restrictive ones for new dicamba herbicides, is a dangerous game this season. “Just because there aren’t any ‘crops’ up, doesn’t mean there aren’t other sensitive plants to worry about, plus it’s just plain wrong,” Corkill told DTN. FERTILIZER FILLING FIELDS Growers are still spreading fertilizer, mostly in the form of ammonia, in Iowa, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois, farmers told DTN. Corkill has just finished up his nitrogen applications in northern Illinois. Over in Indiana, Plummer took some time early in the week to give his triticale a second shot of nitrogen. All are eager to move on to the spring season’s most critical step: corn and bean planting. “I will be planting hard when it dries and the sun comes out,” Magnussen said. “All ready to hit the field to plant as soon as it is fit!” added Corkill. Source: Emily Unglesbee, DTN
Dry Soils and Residual Herbicides
Decades ago it was very common for the majority of corn and soybean acres in Illinois to be treated with one or more soil-residual herbicides before crop/weed emergence. During the 1980s, commercialization of broad-spectrum, postemergence herbicides began the shift away from widespread use of soil-residual herbicides; products such as Basagran, Classic, Accent and Pursuit contributed to the early adoption of postemergence weed control programs. The era of total postemergence weed control reached its zenith following the widespread adoption of glyphosate-resistant crops and the concomitant use of glyphosate. However, the evolution of glyphosate resistance in several weed species has heralded a shift back to the use of soil-residual herbicides, especially in soybean. Soil-residual herbicides can provide many weed management benefits, but several factors influence their effectiveness. Factors such as product selection, application rate, and when the herbicide is applied in relation to crop planting are largely under the control of the farmer, whereas soil moisture content at the time of application and the interval between application and the first precipitation event are factors largely beyond the farmer’s control. In order for a soil-applied herbicide to be effective, the herbicide needs to be available for uptake by the weed seedling (usually before the seedling emerges, but some soil-applied herbicides can control small emerged weeds under certain conditions). Soil-applied herbicides have an Achilles heel: when applied to the soil surface they require mechanical incorporation or precipitation to move them into the soil solution. Herbicide effectiveness can be significantly reduced when a soil-applied herbicide is sprayed on a dry soil surface with no incorporation (mechanical or by precipitation) for several days following application. How much rainfall is required to move the herbicide into the soil and how soon after application precipitation is needed are difficult to define and can vary by herbicide, but surface-applied herbicides generally require 0.5 to 1.0 inch of precipitation within 7 to10 days after application for optimal incorporation. Factors such as soil condition, soil moisture content, residue cover, and the chemical properties of the herbicide influence how much and how soon after application precipitation is needed. If no precipitation is received between application and planting, mechanical incorporation, where feasible, can still help move the herbicide into the soil solution. Source: Aaron Hager, University of Illinois Extension
NDA Finds Skimmer Device at Fuel Pump in Lexington; Warns Consumers to be on the Lookout
LINCOLN - A card skimmer device was discovered this week by a Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) inspector during a routine pump inspection at a gas station in Lexington. Skimming and shimming devices can be attached to ATMs, gas pumps and other places where people swipe their credit and debit cards. Thieves utilize the devices to steal financial information.
Did you know that you can support your local farmer, ethanol partner ...
Did you know that you can support your local farmer, ethanol partner and communities by fueling up at your Aurora Cooperative A-Stop? When you purchase ethanol-blended gasoline from your local A-Stop, you're not just pumping high-quality, clean-burning gas into your vehicle, you're pumping revenue back into your local communities. Be sure to stop in at one of your local A-Stops to fuel up with your locally grown and produced ethanol from your local fuel partner. E15 WILL BE AVAILABLE at the York, Grand Island and Aurora West A-Stops next week.>
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How Have U.S. Crop Acres Changes Over the Past 25 Years?
Over the past 25 years, there have been shifts in crops planted in the United States. Overall, acres in feed grain crops decreased while acres in oilseed crops increased. Feed grain crops losing acres were wheat, oats, barley, and sorghum. The only feed grain crop with a large acre increase was corn. Within oilseed crops, soybeans accounted for 90% of the acres in the category. Over time, U.S. Farmers have tended to specialize production in corn and soybeans in the United States. Changes in Acres from 1991-93 to 2014-16 Acre changes are reported for all crops that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) categorized as “principal crops” in its 2017 Prospective Planting Report. In addition, acres are reported for six other crops for which National Agricultural Statistical Service (NASS) has crop data: flaxseed, lentils, mustard, peas, rapeseed, and sunflowers. The principal crops along with the additional six crops can be roughly categorized as field crops. Not included in this analysis are changes in vegetables, fruits, and tree bearing crops. In 2016, there were 322 million acres planted in these field crops. Modest variations in total acres in field crops occurred, with a range from 315 million acres in 2011 to 335 million ACRES in 1996. A trend of increasing or decreasing acres devoted to field crops does not exist (see Figure 1). To make acre change comparisons, acres are averaged from the years from 1991 to 1993 (1991-93) and from 2014 to 2016 (2014-16). Three-year averages are used to minimize the influences of anomalous factors impacting acreages. The year 1991 is selected for the first year as that is the first year that NASS reported acres for several of these crops. Table 1 shows a list of crops for which acre changes are reported. These crops are divided into four categories for making comparisons: Feed grains, wheat, and rice. This category includes corn, wheat, barley, oats, rice, and sorghum. These crops often provided energy for human and animal diets, as well as for providing energy through biofuels. To some extent, these crops will substitute for one another. For example, both corn and wheat can be used as an energy source in animal diets. Oilseeds, peanuts, and pulses. This category includes soybeans, canola, peanuts, lentils, flaxseed, and sunflower. These crops can serve as protein sources. Hay. Other. Other crops include cotton, tobacco, sugar beets, sugarcane, and mustard. These crops do not fit in the above categories. Between 1991-93 and 2014-16, six crops lost more than 1,000,000 acres; wheat, oats, hay, barley, sorghum, and cotton (see Table 1). By far, the crop with the largest loss in acres was wheat, with a loss of 17 million acres. Wheat was followed by oats, hay, barley, sorghum, and cotton. Of these highest acre losing crops, four to the crops are categorized as “feed grains, wheat, and rice”: wheat, oats, barley, and sorghum. Between 1991-93 and 2014-16, four crops gained over 1 million acres (see Table 1). Soybean acres increased by 24 million acres. Corn had the second largest increase with 15 million acres. Canola had an increase of 2 million acres. Peas increased by 1 million acres. Between 1991-93 and 2014-16, there were shifts in the types of crops grown in the United States. The “feed grains, wheat, rice”, “hay”, and “other” crop categories lost acres. The “oilseed, peanuts, pulse” category gained acres (see Table 1). Feed grains, wheat, and rice At the beginning of the 1990s, corn and wheat had roughly the same acres (see Figure 2). Since the 1990s, corn increased in acres, with much of the increase occurring between 2006 through 2012, likely due to the increased use of corn in the production of ethanol. Unlike corn, the other feed grains did not increase acres. Four of the other feed grains lost acres: wheat, oats, barley, and sorghum. Wheat lost 17 million acres, oats lost 5 million acres, and barley lost 5 million acres, and sorghum lost 4 million acres. From 1991 to 2016, rice and rye had relatively stable acres. These acre shifts can be attributed to two factors. First, much of the animal feed use shifted away from other feed grains to corn. Prices and supply of corn relative to other crops likely impacted these factors. The second is the increased use of corn in the production of ethanol. Oilseeds, peanuts, and rice Soybeans was by far the leading “oilseed, peanuts, and pulse” crop. In 2016, there were 83 million acres of soybeans compared to 8 million acres in the other oilseed. Overall, soybeans account for 91% of acres planted to oilseeds in the U.S. Soybeans acres have increased since 1991 from 59 million acres to 83 million acres. Other crops in the “oilseed, peanuts, and pulse” category have remained stable at 8 million acres (see Figure 3). Concentration in Corn and Soybeans The above acre changes resulted in a continuing concentration into corn and soybeans (see Figure 4). In 1991, corn and soybeans accounted for 41% of the acres in field crops. This percentage has been increasing at a steady rate over time, reaching 55% in 2016. Summary During the last 25 years, acres have shifted away from “feed grains, wheat, rice”, “hay”, and “other” categories to “Oilseeds, peanuts, pulse” category. Within the “feed grains, wheat, rice” category, corn has become the dominate feed grain in terms of acres. Soybean is the dominant oilseed in terms of acres. Overall, these trends have led to a specialization in corn and soybeans. Source: Gary Schnitkey, University of Illinois
5 Tips for Minimizing Injury from Pre Herbicides
In a world of resistant weeds, residual herbicides are the foundation of our control programs. Cotton injury caused by the pre emerge herbicides is an issue that many growers face every year. Below are some tips to hopefully minimize injury from PRE herbicides. Plant high vigor seed into moist soil (preplant irrigation often needed if available). Shallow planting depth increases herbicide injury potential. Apply proper PRE residual herbicides within 24 hr of planting. If feasible, irrigate between 30 hr after planting and prior to 24 hr before emergence. Then do not irrigate again until at least 5 days after emergence. Most often, the greatest damage occurs when the first irrigation/rainfall event happens during emergence. Irrigate to develop a perfect cotton stand; however, limit irrigation events during the first two weeks after planting to as few as possible after activating residual herbicides. Source: AgFax Weed Solutions
The Good and Bad of New Executive Order for Agriculture
Nearly three and half months after his inauguration, President Trump has signed an executive order targeting agricultural issues that seems to indicate major concerns facing the industry may finally be addressed by the White House in the near future. The hope comes after an executive order signed Tuesday creates an inter-agency task force charged with conducting research, gathering information and charged with preparing a report outlining recommendations for the President's consideration. That executive order, titled “Promoting Agriculture and Rural Prosperity in America,” is tied closely to the Senate confirmation Tuesday of Sonny Perdue as Trump's Agriculture Secretary. The executive order was signed during Trump's meeting with Perdue and a panel of 14 farmers from across the country who had the opportunity to express their concerns for the industry. Many of those concerns were prompted in recent months by the White House's aggressive stand on immigration policy and enforcement, a position that some farmers believe further threatens to complicate agriculture's ability to attract and retain immigrant farm workers and broader issues related to farm worker programs. TRADE ISSUES In addition, trade concerns have become an issue after Trump's opposition to the Trans-Pacific partnership trade deal (TPP) and his expressed intent to renegotiate terms of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), plus his commitment to force Mexico to pay for the construction of a border wall. Mexican officials have promised to take their own aggressive stand in opposition to the President's plans to introduce a border tax policy that would restrict trade between the two nations. They have also been actively seeking alternative trade partners to provide corn and soybeans and other agricultural products that could seriously affect U.S. farmers and their ability to move commodities across the southern border. Perdue's confirmation and the executive order related to agriculture has the support and endorsement of several farm support groups who have expressed hope that serious concerns like trade and immigration will be addressed by the Trump administration in the near future. According to Ray Starling, special assistant to the President for agriculture, the executive order will require the task force, led by Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, to produce a report for the President in 180 days on the impediments to farming in the United States. Starling said the task force will be made up of White House and administration staff. The willingness of the White House to meet with Perdue and a panel of farmers appears to be a positive sign that agriculture may finally be getting some attention in Washington. Combined with the signing of an executive order that creates a special task force gives reason for hope that concerns like trade and immigration will be addressed in the days and weeks ahead. CONCERNS LINGER But in spite of what seems to be a positive development, some farmers may still have justified concerns. While finally having an agriculture secretary to lead the USDA is certainly a positive development, a task force that will research issues like trade and immigration and make a report to the President by November is disheartening at best. Just this week President Trump deferred pressing Mexico to pay for a border wall at least until later this year when the new fiscal year begins, but he has expressed his commitment to the wall project, saying "there will be a wall built," and Mexico will ultimately pay for it, a statement that immediately solicited a reply from Mexican officials who said "there is no scenario" in which Mexico will pay for the wall, an indication the saber rattling between the White House and Mexico City is far from over. In addition, on the same day Perdue was confirmed as Agriculture Secretary, President Trump intensified a trade dispute with Canada, slapping tariffs of up to 24 percent on imported softwood lumber in a move that drew swift criticism from the Canadian government, which vowed to sue if needed. Canadian officials say the tariff violates terms of NAFTA and such a move could intensify trade issues with both Canada and Mexico, two of the United States strongest trade partners. The move seems to escalate an economic disagreement among neighboring nations that normally have demonstrated one of the friendliest international trade relationships in history. Making the move even more serious is that it quickly follows a fight over a new Canadian milk policy that U.S. producers say violates the North American Free Trade Agreement, an obvious uptick in trade disagreements related to NAFTA. While Perdue's appointment and a special task force to vet farm issues serves as a carrot to an industry worried about the President's lack of concern for agricultural policy to date, some fear a ramping up of policies that alienate the United States most loyal trade partners could end in serious problems for farm and ranch production in the years ahead. And deferring important issues like trade and immigration for a period of no less than six months represents an effort that falls short of what farmers had hoped to get concerning issues they say can affect their current farm year. On the positive side, farmers and support groups are pleased the administration is looking at deregulating federal rules related to agriculture and seem generally pleased to have a new Secretary at the Helm at USDA. Trade and immigration issues, however, remain on the minds of most. Source: Logan Hawkews, Southwest Farm Press 
Perdue Joins White House ?Farmers Roundtable? as President Trump Issues Executive Order on Agriculture
U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today joined President Trump for a “Farmers Roundtable” at the White House to address issues facing the American agriculture community, as the president signed an Executive Order establishing an Interagency Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity. The roundtable discussion allowed representatives from all corners of American agriculture to raise concerns and share ideas, just as the task force begins its mission “to promote economic development and revitalization, job growth, infrastructure, innovation, and quality of life issues for rural America,” according to the president’s order. The session capped a busy first day in office for Perdue, who was sworn in by Associate Justice of the Supreme Court Clarence Thomas as the 31st U.S. Secretary of Agriculture before greeting employees at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and travelling to the White House for the roundtable. “The people who are on the front lines of American agriculture don’t have the luxury of waiting to tend to their crops and livestock, so there was no better time to convene this meeting of the minds than on my first day,” Perdue said. “President Trump has made it clear that addressing the needs of rural America will be a top priority, and the message that we want to send to the agriculture community is that we are here, we are working hard, and we are on their side.” Farmers Roundtable The Farmers Roundtable featured more than a dozen farmers and representatives of the agriculture community who discussed with President Trump and Secretary Perdue a variety of topics, including agricultural trade, regulatory reform, rural investment and infrastructure, labor issues, and the Farm Bill. Participants in the roundtable included: Lisa Johnson-Billy, farmer and former Oklahoma House member, Lindsay, OK Luke Brubaker, Brubaker Farms, Mount Joy, PA Hank Choate, Choate’s Belly Acres, Cement City, MI Tom Demaline, Willoway Nurseries, Avon, OH Zippy Duval, President of American Farm Bureau Federation and a farmer from Greensboro, GA Valerie Early, National FFA Central Region Vice President and former 4-H member, Wykoff, MN Lynetta Usher Griner, Usher Land and Timber, Inc., Fanning Springs, FL (also farms in the state of KS) A.G. Kawamura, Orange County Produce, Newport Beach, CA James Lamb, Lamb Farms and Prestage Farms, Clinton, NC Bill Northey, Iowa Secretary of Agriculture and farmer, Spirit Lake, IA Jose Rojas, VP of Farm Operations for Hormel, Colorado Springs, CO Terry Swanson, Swanson Farms, Walsh, CO Maureen Torrey, Torrey Farms, Elba, NY Steve Troxler, NC Commissioner of Agriculture and farmer, Browns Summit, NC “The Farmers Roundtable provided the chance for the President to hear directly from the people on the front lines of American agriculture about what they are dealing with every day,” Secretary Perdue said. “By hosting this discussion, the president has demonstrated his awareness of the plight of American farmers, ranchers, foresters, and producers, his intention to seek input, and his determination to help.” President Trump’s Executive Order President Trump’s Executive Order established the Interagency Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity “to ensure the informed exercise of regulatory authority that impacts agriculture and rural communities.” As Secretary of Agriculture, Perdue will serve as the task force’s chairman. “It is in the national interest to promote American agriculture while protecting and supporting the rural communities where food, forestry, fiber, and renewable fuels are grown,” the text of the Executive Order reads. “It is further in the national interest to ensure that regulatory burdens do not unnecessarily encumber agricultural production, constrain economic growth, hamper job creation, or increase the cost of food for Americans and our customers around the world.” The task force will examine and consider, among other issues, current barriers to economic prosperity in rural America and how innovation and technology may play a role in long-term, sustainable rural development. The panel will attempt to strengthen federalism by working with state agencies charged with implementing economic development, agricultural, and environmental programs, while also emphasizing regulatory flexibility for farms and small businesses. With a dependence on sound science, task force members will examine crop protection tools used by farmers and also address concerns regarding labor needed for livestock and year-round agricultural jobs. Additionally, the group will focus on tax policies that allow family farms to remain intact, while also protecting against federal takeover of state-adjudicated water rights, permitting and licensing, and conservation requirements beyond what is provided in law. Finally, members will look to improve food safety and the implementation of food safety laws, but also recognize the unique nature of farming and the diverse business structures of farms. “It used to be that people in agriculture feared disease and drought as the greatest threats to their livelihoods and their mission of feeding America and the world,” Perdue said. “While those hazards remain, too often now it is the government – through interference and regulation – that poses the most existential threat to American farming. We aim to put a stop to that.” The task force will seek input from stakeholders in the agricultural community and is required to issue a report with recommendations for legislative or administrative actions within 180 days. The task force will consist of representatives from the following cabinet agencies and executive branch departments: Secretary of the Treasury; Secretary of Defense; Attorney General; Secretary of the Interior; Secretary of Commerce; Secretary of Labor; Secretary of Health and Human Services; Secretary of Transportation; Secretary of Energy; Secretary of Education; Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency; Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission; Director of the Office of Management and Budget; Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy; Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy; Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers; Director of the Domestic Policy Council; Director of the National Economic Council; Administrator of the Small Business Administration; United States Trade Representative; Director of the National Science Foundation; and Heads of such other executive departments, agencies, and offices as the President or the Secretary of Agriculture may, from time to time, designate. Sonny Perdue, the 31st U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, came by his knowledge of agriculture the old fashioned way: he was born into a farming family in Bonaire, Georgia. From childhood, and through his life in business and elected office, Perdue has experienced the industry from every possible perspective. Under Secretary Perdue, the USDA is facts-based and data-driven, with a decision-making mindset that is customer-focused. As the former governor of Georgia, he is a strong believer in good government who will seek solutions to problems and not lament that the agency might be faced with difficult challenges. His four guiding principles are clear: to maximize the ability of American agriculture to create jobs, sell foods and fiber, and feed and clothe the world; to prioritize customer service for the taxpayers; to ensure that our food supply is safe and secure; and to maintain good stewardship of the natural resources that provide us with our miraculous bounty. And understanding that we live in a global economy where trade is of top importance, Secretary Perdue has pledged to be an unapologetic advocate for American agriculture.   Source: United States Department of Agriculture 
Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers
Spring is officially here and planters in the fields around the county are a good indicator. According to the United Stated Department of Agriculture?s crop progess report, 3 percent of Nebraska?s corn crop was in the ground the week ending April 16, down from 6 percent last year at the same time. Farmers may be a few days behind where they were last year, but area producers say soil conditions are just about right for planting. Read more in this week's print or e-editions. ? Rate this article:  Select ratingGive Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers 1/5Give Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers 2/5Give Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers 3/5Give Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers 4/5Give Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers 5/5 No votes yet
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National
Tough call?plant or wait
Farmers are faced with a tough decision. With cold and wet weather in the forecast, do you keep planting or wait for warmer and drier conditions? Larry Klever, who farms in west-central Iowa near Audubon, decided to keep going. ?I started a little over a week ago and I?m still planting today (Wednesday)?in the face of the cold weather,? Klever says. ?It?s kind of risky and I?m not sure of the results. Continue reading Tough call–plant or wait at Brownfield Ag News.      
Higher rates of farm delinquency
An ag economist says farm delinquency rates are trending higher ? but what does that mean for the overall ag economy and for farmers? Both non-real estate and real estate farm delinquency rates are trending higher.? Purdue University ag economist David Widmar says the trend higher speaks to the tough financial conditions producers are facing. AUDIO: Managing For Profit Continue reading Higher rates of farm delinquency at Brownfield Ag News.      
American Soybean Association pleased with President?s farm task force
The American Soybean Association (ASA) is pleased with the formation of the White House task force to address challenges facing farmers.? ASA President Ron Moore, tells Brownfield he was frustrated by delays in confirming Secretary Perdue, but he says he?s happy that the President?s executive order recognizes the work of farmers. ?And so we?re encouraged by the significant sign that the President has said, ?Look, America, agriculture is important and we?re going to do what we can immediately to make things better,?? Moore told Brownfield Ag News Wednesday. Continue reading American Soybean Association pleased with President’s farm task force at Brownfield Ag News.      
Stallman: Understand the importance of NAFTA before making changes
The former president of the American Farm Bureau says President Trump needs to understand the importance of NAFTA before making any major changes to the agreement. On Wednesday, President Trump said he is considering an executive order to withdraw the US from the North American Free Trade Agreement. Bob Stallman says industries that rely on trade need to be more vocal when telling the President why NAFTA is so important.? ??The next thing is ? assuming he gets the message ? and I believe he will,? he says.? Continue reading Stallman: Understand the importance of NAFTA before making changes at Brownfield Ag News.      
Precedence needs to be set on Canadian dairy trade
A dairy farmer says Canada creating an additional class of milk manipulates the North American Free Trade Agreement and cannot go unnoticed. ?If other trading nations see that you can create new classifications, create new policy since the agreement was put in place that allows you to manipulate the agreement? we cannot let that go unnoticed because other countries will be doing the same thing.? Fifth-generation Michigan dairy and cash crop farmer Hank Choate was part of an exclusive farmer roundtable with President Trump in Washington Tuesday. Continue reading Precedence needs to be set on Canadian dairy trade at Brownfield Ag News.      
Michigan cow linked to Indiana TB positive beef herd
A beef cow in northern Michigan has been confirmed positive for bovine tuberculosis after a trace investigation of a positive Indiana herd last year. The cow on a small beef farm in Lake County, Michigan was confirmed positive after it was imported from a herd in Indiana that later tested positive for bovine TB. Two beef herds and one white-tail deer were confirmed positive in Franklin County, Indiana last December. A three-mile surveillance area sounding the Lake County farm has been established. Continue reading Michigan cow linked to Indiana TB positive beef herd at Brownfield Ag News.      
Probiotics might replace antibiotics for pathogen control
A University of Wisconsin researcher is targeting disease-causing bacteria without using antibiotics. Microbiologist?J.P. Van Pijkeren tells Brownfield he is using the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri to deliver an engineered virus that kills Clostridium difficile , or C. diff. ?“What we’re doing is to use our probiotic as a mothership, if you like, to deliver a therapeutic load with the aim to eradicate pathogens.” Van Pijkeren says many antibiotics kill good and bad microbes, and many pathogens have developed a resistance to antibiotics? so engineering the DNA of viruses to precisely target the problem has many advantages. ? Continue reading Probiotics might replace antibiotics for pathogen control at Brownfield Ag News.      
Monsanto?s Fraley: Netflix series serves public with science
Monsanto Chief Technology Officer Dr. Robb Fraley says his appearance on the new Bill Nye Netflix series is important because it brings science to the public.? Fraley helped develop and commercialize genetically modified crops.? He was featured on an episode of Bill Nye Saves the World, which explored GMOs.? Fraley tells Brownfield Nye?s humorous approach makes science entertaining. ?Too many times in the past we?ve approached these discussions with facts and data, and made it too complicated,? Fraley told Brownfield Ag News Wednesday.? Continue reading Monsanto’s Fraley: Netflix series serves public with science at Brownfield Ag News.      
Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: April 26, 2017
May corn closed at $3.59,?down 6?cents May soybeans closed at $9.45 and 3/4,?down?8?and?3/4?cents May soybean meal closed at $309.60,?down?$2.90 May soybean oil closed at 31.91,?up 33?points May wheat closed at $4.07 and 3/4,?down?1 cent Apr. live cattle closed at $132.02,?up?$2.20 May?lean hogs closed at $64.67,?down 55?cents Jun.?crude oil closed at $49.30,?down 26?cents May cotton closed at 80.69,?down 2?points May rice closed at $9.14 and 1/2,?down?15?cents May Class III milk closed at $15.32,?unchanged Apr. Continue reading Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: April 26, 2017 at Brownfield Ag News.      
News conference with Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue
Brownfield?s Tom Steever will be on the ground in Kansas City on Thursday, April 27, 2017 for a news conference with US Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue. Continue reading News conference with Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue at Brownfield Ag News.      
US Secretary of Ag speaks to farmers
Brownfield?s Tom Steever will be on the ground in Kansas City on Friday, April 28, 2017 as newly minted United States Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue speaks to farmers at the American Royal complex. Continue reading US Secretary of Ag speaks to farmers at Brownfield Ag News.      
Balance, even with healthy foods
Balance is important, even with healthy foods.??Many foods provide us with health benefits, but nutrition experts agree, balance is the most important part of a healthy diet.??Dietitian Amanda Barnes says avocados and carrots are good for you, but that doesn?t mean you should overeat them. HEALTHY LIVING PROGRAM: Balance important in healthy diet Choose MyPlate guidelines Continue reading Balance, even with healthy foods at Brownfield Ag News.      
Lynch named Chopped champion; wins $50,000 for 4-H
Web star and 4-H alum chef Lazarus Lynch has earned $50,000 for 4-H.? Lynch was named champion of the Food Network?s Chopped Star Power tournament. Sixteen stars from the web, sports, comedy, and Hollywood competed over four preliminary rounds for the chance to advanced to the grand finale. Lynch grew up in New York City got his start with 4-H as a sophomore in high school.? He says 4-H helps grow true leaders by believing in the possibility of young people.? Continue reading Lynch named Chopped champion; wins $50,000 for 4-H at Brownfield Ag News.      
Midday cash livestock markets
The Fed Cattle Exchange Internet Auction on Wednesday had 5,448 head listed and 1945 head were sold. 1 to 9 day delivery, 355 head, weighted average price of 131.68. 1-17 day delivery, 158 head, weighted average of 129.89. 17 to 30 day delivery, 1394 head with a weighted average of 125.42. Holstein steers with a 1-17 day delivery, 40 head at 93.50. Last week?s weighted average price was 128.62 on just 701 head. Continue reading Midday cash livestock markets at Brownfield Ag News.      
Casey?s to begin offering higher ethanol blends
Casey?s General Stores has announced it will begin offering the higher ethanol blends of E15 and E85 at 17 sites in Iowa, Illinois and Kansas. The Iowa Corn Promotion Board applauds the move. Board president Larry Klever of Audubon says it?s something they?ve been discussing with Casey?s for quite some time. ?It?s one of the most common things I?ve heard over the years is people asking me why Casey?s doesn?t,? Klever says. Continue reading Casey’s to begin offering higher ethanol blends at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Bovine TB Found in Western Michigan Cow from Indiana
Bovine TB found in western Michigan cow from Indiana
BASF Quarterly Sales Rise, Acquires Big Data Firm for Ag
BASF’s Agricultural Solutions business reported a 4% rise in quarterly sales on higher volumes and positive currency effects, as prices remained stable. The Agricultural Solutions segment reported sales of $2.1 billion (?1.9?billion) despite a market environment that remained difficult. EBIT before special items declined by $63.1 (?58) million to $580 (?533) million compared with the strong first quarter of 2016. This was the result of lower average margins due to a different product mix. Fixed costs rose slightly, due in part to the startup of new plants. Dr. Kurt Bock, Chairman and CEO, said on a conference call the company is also focusing increasingly on digital support for its agricultural customers. “A few days ago, we signed an agreement to acquire the U.S. firm ZedX. Based in Bellefonte, Pennsylvania, ZedX is a leader in the development of big-data models for weather, harvests and crop protection which can further increase efficiency in agriculture,” Bock said. Agricultural Solutions Results “Sales in Europe nearly matched the level of the previous first quarter. We raised volumes considerably in central and eastern Europe, especially for herbicides. By contrast, western Europe posted?a volumes decline,” BASF reported. Positive currency effects and increased demand led to considerable sales growth in North America. Higher volumes arose primarily from solid business development for herbicides, especially the new solutions Engenia and Zidua PRO. Sales rose considerably in Asia. This was largely attributable to higher volumes of fungicides due to earlier demand in China and the launch of the new Seltima formulation in India, as well as to solid sales volumes for herbicides in Indonesia and Australia. In the region South America, Africa, Middle East, a considerable increase in sales was mainly the result of positive currency?effects from the Brazilian real. Higher volumes of herbicides in Argentina and of insecticides in Africa and the Middle East contributed to the increase, while lower prices dampened sales development.  
Dow AgroSciences Announces Q1 2017 Results
The Dow Chemical Co., parent company of Dow AgroSciences, announced its first quarter (Q1) earnings. Below you will see information on Dow AgroSciences (referred to as Agricultural Sciences). Agricultural Sciences reported first quarter sales of $1.6 billion, down 5% versus the year-ago period driven by a volume decline of 5%. Crop Protection volume declined despite higher demand for insecticides in most geographic areas and continued adoption of Arylex broadleaf herbicide. These gains were more than offset by reduced demand primarily for herbicides and insecticides in Asia Pacific, driven by lower demand for rice herbicides in China where flooding during last year?s season led to high channel inventories that continued into this year. Seed volumes declined primarily due to lower demand for corn seeds in North America on projected reduced acreage and lower demand for sunflower seed in EMEAI and Latin America. These factors were mostly offset by volume gains in corn in Latin America and in cotton in the United States, reflecting the successful launch of ENLIST cotton and early grower adoption. Operating EBITDA was $351 million, down from $403 million in the year-ago period as a higher contribution from the Seeds business, driven by demand for ENLIST cotton and growth in corn in Latin America, was more than offset by lower volume in Crop Protection, particularly in Asia Pacific.
Arysta LifeScience Launches Rio Plant Growth Stimulant
Following Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approval, Arysta LifeScience North America recently announced the launch of RIO, a plant growth stimulant that activates endogenous natural plant hormone activity for enhanced plant reproductive growth. RIO is the newest brand in the company?s BioSolutions portfolio. The product is labeled for various specialty and row crops. ?At Arysta LifeScience, we understand the growing interest and demand for plant growth stimulants, as they allow growers to enhance their crops? genetic expressions and reach their genetic potential. Plant growth stimulants is just one area in which Arysta LifeScience is providing our customers with more choices and more ways to improve the quality of their crops and the boost to their yields,? said Royce Schulte, BioSolutions Business Manager, Arysta LifeScience. ?RIO is derived from natural plant sources and encourages plants to reach their full potential.? How RIO Works RIO boosts natural plant hormone activity that allows plants to develop more effectively, including mineral uptake, cell division (for roots, stems and leaves), chlorophyll and photosynthesis activity, fruit set and growth, and nutrient and carbohydrate translocation to the growing fruit. This efficacy ? in turn ? can result in higher yields and improved crop quality. ?The active ingredients in RIO work similarly to the way plant growth regulators work, but the product stimulates natural plant hormone activity,? Schulte explained. The mode of action in RIO also activates metabolic pathways and influences root development, which leads to increased foliar area, formation of more vigorous floral buds, high flower/fruit sets and increased size/consistency of fruit. ?With RIO, growers should see increased yields and improved quality of various specialty and row crops,? Schulte concluded. For additional information on RIO or the BioSolutions portfolio of products, ask your retailer or local Arysta LifeScience sales representative, or visit www.arysta-na.com.
Grassland Fiasco Proves Importance of Trade
It’s hard to understate the anguish caused in the kitchens and milking barns of the 75 patrons of Grassland Dairy Products, Greenwood, Wis.
NAFTA Renegotiations Change Markets Focus
Grain markets are range bound with some bargain hunting after the President clears up his stance on NAFTA. The US Dollar Index retreats due to strength in the Canadian and Mexican currency.
Even the Hipster Organic Milk Craze Isn't Enough to End Glut
Even with record U.S. demand, organic dairies look for buyers.
Cargill Exits Cattle Feeding, Sells Two Yards
In the last year Cargill has gone from the 4th largest cattle feeder in the U.S. to not feeding any cattle.
Even the Hipster Organic Milk Craze Isn't Enough to End Glut (2)
Even the Hipster Organic Milk Craze Isn't Enough to End Glut (2)
Death Tax Officially on Chopping Block
The Trump administration released a summary of its sweeping tax reform plan Wednesday that has some considerable changes – including repealing the so-called death tax, which is sometimes criticized as a hardship for small businesses and farms.
Banned Yak Meat Smuggled in Sweaters Seized at JFK Airport
Customs agents at John F. Kennedy Airport have seized more than 300 pounds of banned Yak meat smuggled in sweaters, pants and shawls.
Minnesota Dairies Keep Wisconsin Buyer After All
A handful of Minnesota dairy farms that faced losing their buyer because of a trade dispute with Canada will keep the buyer after all.
Right-wing Radio Host Alex Jones Responds to Chobani Lawsuit
Right-wing radio host and conspiracy theorist Alex Jones says he's not backing down in response to a defamation lawsuit filed by Greek yogurt giant Chobani.
More Displaced Producers Find Markets
Wisconsin official "cautiously optimistic" that all affected producers will find new markets by deadline.